The Briefly for June 2, 2020 – The “Repeal Civil Rights Law Section 50-a” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: An NYPD union is suspended from Twitter, the arguments for defunding the NYPD, Revel and Citi Bike shut down during curfew, cute trash pandas, and more

Today – Low: 63˚ High: 71˚
Rain overnight.

Over the weekend, an NYPD officer pulled his gun out and pointed it at a crowd of protestors and it was caught on video. The NYPD is conducting an internal review, but the mayor took no time to call for this cop’s gun and badge. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

The NYPD’s union has spent millions of dollars protecting Civil Rights Law section 50-a, which prohibits the city from releasing findings of misbehavior of NYPD cops, and they are getting ready to dig into their pockets to fight reform, which has the support of the governor and mayor. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

On the state senate’s website, you can sign your support for the repeal of 50-a.

The cries to defund the NYPD are getting louder and they’re starting to come from elected officials. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

It took public shaming from AOC to Corey Johnson to literally everyone who saw the footage, but the mayor is ready to admit that the NYPD driving an SUV into a crowd of people is “dangerous and unacceptable” and doesn’t think he “expressed it as well as I should have.” (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

When Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux designed Union Square, they specifically designed a portion of the park for public gatherings and protests. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

“We have to call out everyone who says anything that is racist, on any level. Don’t be scared of telling Cuomo that he’s speaking racist language. If you sit in these city agency and Corporate meetings as a black person but afraid to call racism out then YOU are part of the problem. Stop being scared. Be strong for your children and grandchildren.”
– Vernon Jones / CEO of JIG Media for East New York News, The NYPD Slave Catching Tactics Give Reason to Create a New Way To Hold Police Accountable for Their Violations Against Black New Yorkers

At 11:00 last night, the first night of NYC’s curfew, I found myself on my way home from the people gathering outside Brooklyn’s 77th precinct, realizing I could have gotten there quicker had I jumped on a Revel or Citi Bike but kept walking anyway. I was wrong because both services shut down at 11 pm with the curfew. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

“It’s a mafia mentality. It’s a ‘If you speak out against us, you’re not with us’ kind of deal. If the writing on the wall is ‘let’s go arrest people’ and the people happen to be black, [then you have to do it or] you’re not with us. It’s a shit system.” An interview with a Brooklyn cop. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

Two Brooklynites and one upstate New Yorker were arraigned in federal court for allegedly throwing Molotov cocktails at police cars in two separate incidents during protests against police brutality on May 30. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

Manhattan state Senator Brad Hoylman called upon the city’s five district attorneys Monday not to prosecute people arrested for disorderly conduct or unlawful assembly during protests, charging that “protesting injustice is not a crime.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

“We can no longer tolerate the police officers who do not uphold the rule of law but instead engage in murder, assault and racial profiling, and then protect each other.”
– Francis Greenburger and Cheryl Roberts for amNew York Metro, Is there any justice left in America?

How did you learn about the arrest of the mayor’s daughter? The same way the mayor did, he read about it in the news. How did the information about the mayor’s daughter get to the news? The union that represents the NYPD’s sergeants tweeted out personal information about Chiara de Blasio. They were temporarily suspended from Twitter for the privacy breach. (Dana Rubenstein and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

“Behind the crowd, a four-year-old black boy tried to teach his baby brother how to clap hands. He held his hands and moved them towards as the crowd loudly clapped and shouted: “I can’t breathe.” ” (Ali Tufan Koc for Bedford + Bowery)

“I am tired. Tired of how routine violence against African Americans at the hands of white people has been and continues to be. Angry as a journalist that this has happened so often that we all know the angles that must be covered, the questions to be asked, the stories to be written. Angrier still that as an African American journalist, I must explain, again and again, how dehumanizing this all is.”
– Amanda Barrett for Brooklyn Eagle, American Diary: To be Black and a journalist at this moment

Five things to know if you’re going out to protest in New York City. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Bronx Councilmember Ritchie Torres are demanding an independent investigation into the NYPD’s actions during a weekend of protests, challenging Mayor de Blasio’s plan to direct the Corporation Counsel and Department of Investigations to investigate. They want an investigation that is not done by any office controlled by the mayor. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

10 riots in the city’s history. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This will be the only mention of damage caused in Soho during protests. Don’t mix the message of protestors with the damage of looters. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery) note: I’m not saying that Bedford + Bowery is doing this, they do a good job of pointing out that the damage was caused by people separate from the George Floyd protests.

Adorable: To close out today, here are some photos of a trash panda and her babies of Carroll Park, who have taken up residence ever since the park has been closed to people. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking, photos by Gary Dolan)

The Briefly for February 6, 2020 – The “No More Paying Brokers Fees For Rentals” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo targets bridges for fare evasion, Prada settles a blackface lawsuit, where to eat in Industry City, High Maintenance, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 45˚
Rain throughout the day.

Everything you need to know about New York’s new plastic bag ban. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Is the “Molten Chocolate Body Scrub” weird or soothing with its cocoa scrub and chocolate mask? It’s both. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Is it better to rent or buy in NYC? There’s no one answer for anyone in the city. (Ameena Walker)

Landlord, not tenants, will now be forced to foot the bill for New York City’s notoriously high brokers fees, following new guidance issued by the NY Department of State. Maybe renting IS better! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Apartments without roommates with rent under $1,800 actually exist in the city, and here’s five of them. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

There have been no confirmed cases of coronavirus in the city but two more people have been quarantined due to a possible infection. This brings the total number of currently suspected cases to four, the first case was determined not to be coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A jackass in Chinatown attacked a mask-wearing woman in what is being investigated as a hate crime by the NYPD and the Hate Crime Task Force. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

You’ve got until February 13th if you want to put yourself into the lottery for the NYC Marathon. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

A year after Amazon cried its way back to Seattle, the Queens Chamber of Commerce has launched its “Relocate to Queens” campaign. (Bill Parry for QNS)

A 24-year-old man from Oklahoma allegedly stumbled into New York City, visited a guy he met on a dating app, killed him, and blew the slain man’s money all over the city, according court documents from the Manhattan district attorney’s office. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

Governor Cuomo’s Penn Station plan, by the numbers. (C.J. Hughes for The Real Deal)

Governor Cuomo is taking his fare evasion road show to the state’s bridges and tunnels, making evading a bridge toll to misdemeanor “theft of services.” Any Churro vendors on the Throggs Neck Bridge better watch out. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Welcome to the stretch of I-95 from the George Washington Bridge and stretching into the Cross Bronx Expressway, the fifth most dangerous spot in the nation for car crashes. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Signs for the Verrazzano Bridge have never been spelled correctly, thanks to an error on the contract for the bridge’s construction. That has been corrected. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

In an effort to fight postpartum depression, every first-time parent in New York City will soon be eligible to receive as many as six home visits from professionals for postnatal mental health care. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

New York City’s Department of Education consistently failed to follow requirements for annual lead-paint inspections in schools over the last five years, records show. No shit. (Christopher Werth for Gothamist)

An interview with the creators of High Maintenance on the fourth season of the show on keeping the show fresh, their collaboration with This American Life, Larry Owens, and more. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Restaurant workers are protesting the $15 minimum wage. Why? Because Governor Cuomo has twice raised the minimum wage to $15 for “everybody” and excluded them twice. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Meet the women behind Monumental Women, the group behind Central Park’s first statue of a woman. (Currie Engel for NY City Lens)

Two gangs from Brooklyn who are said to be responsible for at least 13 shootings, homicides and other crimes, were charged in a 122-count indictment after cops arrested 34 members and seized 16 guns in “Operation Boxed In.” The gangs were named, and this is seriously their names, the Wooo and the Choo. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Prada has agreed to a “groundbreaking” restorative justice agreement with the NYC Commission on Human Rights after using blackface imagery in their products and displays in their stores. They’ll create a scholarship and paid internship for racial minorities, make a commitment to recruit underrepresented employees, appoint a diversity officer, and everyone in the company will undergo racial equality training. This would be commendable if it wasn’t being forced on them as part of settling a lawsuit. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Manny Teixeira is the city’s longest-serving doorman, working in the same building since 1965., taking over for his father. (CBS New York)

Arthur Schwartz, the attorney for loud and angry wealthy white boomers and the man who tried to stop the 14th St busway, has turned his attention towards attempting to stop the East Side Coastal Resiliency project’s installation of a seawall in East River Park. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats to Tanay Warerkar, Erika Adams, and Luke Fortney for joining the team at Eater. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio’s approval rating is lower than President Trump’s. He’s a lame duck with two years to go. His presidential campaign was DOA. Can the mayor do anything to excite New Yorkers again? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Mayor Bill de Blasio pushed back against a story from President Trump’s State of the Union that claims New York’s sanctuary city policy led to the murder of a Queens woman, accusing the president of trying to “exploit” the victim’s death. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The Strand is coming to the location of the now closed Book Culture on the Upper West Side. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

From March of 1965: Burying Malcolm X (Marlene Nadler for Village Voice)

The case of who killed Malcom X may be reopened 55 years after his death. (John Leland for NY Times)

Where to eat in Industry City. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for May 9, 2019 – The “Is This Where They Dump the Bodies on Law & Order?” Edition

The NYPD’s use of chokeholds continues, there has been no state movement on legal marijuana, a boozy Taco Bell in the West Village, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The City Council pass a legislative package with 17 bills aimed at protecting tenants’ rights. (amNY)

The hunt for the city’s best cheesecake. (Grub Street)

We are six weeks away from the second 2019 deadline for the state’s legislature to do something about legalizing recreational marijuana. In order to make it work, the governor is going to have to start throwing his weight around. (Gothamist)

New York is often shaped in the minds of visitors by the shows and movies that portray it. From the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to Seinfeld to Law and Order, every non-New Yorker’s New York is an imaginary city. (Curbed)

The life of a polyamourous Hasidic swordfighter in, yes, how did you know, Bushwick. (Bushwick)

The top 10 secrets of Barnard College. (Untaped Cities)

“All of the pre-made food looks so sad.” The reviews of the city’s Amazon Go store are in. (Gothamist)

The NYPD spent $35 million trying to retrain officers after Eric Garner died a chokehold. Record show that chokeholds are still being used by NYPD officers, very few face discipline, some have lost vacation time, and none have been fired. (NY Times)

Is the West Village ready for a boozy Taco Bell? (Commercial Observer)

Don’t pet the dog. All the things you’ve never asked commuters with service dogs and what they want you to know. (Gothamist)

M & S Schmalberg, the makers of silk flowers for over a century, gets the NY Times profile treatment. (NY Times)

The Prospect Park Perimeter is getting a new bike lane along Ocean Ave. (6sqft)

On an intersection, just one block from the Brooklyn Museum, the rats have begun a hostile takeover. (Gothamist)

28 portraits of this year’s Tony nominees. (NY Times)

176 pounds of cocaine was seized, worth nearly $3 million, in the city’s recent drug bust that resulted in 19 arrests. (Patch)

In New York State, you can be arrested for not paying a parking ticket, which becomes part of your criminal record. State lawmakers are looking to change that. (NY Times)

No keys? No way. Hell’s Kitchen tenants sued and won the rights to have physical keys for their apartments after a landlord installed a keyless entry system that they claimed violated their right to privacy. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wondered but have been too scared to ask where the Museum Mile is or what’s a part of it, this Miracle Mile guide is your answer. (NYCGo)

New York City is the second worst place to work if you don’t have at least a bachelor’s degree. (Patch)

In praise of the ten-egg breakfast. (Grub Street)

The New York Times reviews The Met’s ‘Camp,’ calling it “Frustrating.” (NY Times)

The city is looking at banning “ghost” guns. Not the Ghostbusters’ proton packs, but gun frames to which other components attach to. They lack serial numbers, don’t require background checks and would allow you to build an untraceable gun. (Gothamist)

From Fox and Friends to Famiglia Pizza: The lowlights of NYC: Donald Trump’s New York. (Huff Post)

13 places to have post afternoon tea in NYC. (Eater)

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