The Briefly for August 29, 2019 – The “Fried Chicken Sandwich Ridiculousness Ends This Week” Edition

The police union calls for de Blasio and O’Neill’s removal, 15 trendy restaurants you can get into, security measures for the West Indian Day Parade, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A ban on foie gras is working its way through the city council and could come up for a vote in the fall. More than half of the council has so-sponsored the bill and it has support from the mayor, but there are questions about the ability to enforce the bill. (NY Times)

Despite the ever-changing nature of the city, Gem Spa is swimming upstream on the corner of St. Marks and 2nd Ave in a struggle to survive. (NY Times)

New construction can’t stop the rats. (Bowery Boogie)

This week ends the Popeye’s fried chicken sandwich frenzy that took over August, as all locations will be completely sold out of the sandwich. (Grub Street)

Google Pigeon is turning to crowdsourcing to solve real-time public transit information, kinda like Waze for the buses and trains. It might be hard to log a delay between stations without a connection to the internet. (Streetsblog)

Photos: Inside Borough Park’s Torah Animal World, which is full of taxidermied animals mentioned in the Torah. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be distracted, the classics are still the only real way to enjoy a meal at Katz’s Deli. (Eater)

The Department of Buildings blames construction materials stored on the roof for the building collapse on Tuesday in the Bronx, calling it a “preventable tragedy.” (Gothamist)

Here’s what eliminating the city’s schools’ gifted programs would look like and what would take their place. (Chalk Beat)

The 21 most anticipated restaurant openings of the fall. (Time Out)

The United States could lose its measles elimination status by October if more cases of the disease are discovered in NYC or NY state. (Huff Post)

Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate activist, arrived via a solar-powered boat on Wednesday after a 15-day trip across the Atlantic to attend the United Nations Climate Action Summit. (NY Times)

It’s rare, but every now and then you come across a subway busker actually worth listening to, like these two guys nailing Prince’s “Kiss.” (Gothamist)

How “public” is New York City’s public transportation? If it doesn’t serve all, who is it meant to serve? (The Indypendent)

No one wants to hear it (except the Halloween-obsessed spooks), but summer is coming to an end. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

How to spend a day eating, drinking, and enjoying Snug Harbor in Staten Island. (NY Times)

The police union passed a vote of no confidence Wednesday in Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill, calling for O’Neill to resign and for Governor Cuomo to remove Mayor de Blasio from office. This is in protest over the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold on Eric Garner lead to his death. (Politico)

The history of the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (6sqft)

The NYPD announced safety measures for the West Indian Day Parade, summarizing their approach with “There will literally be a cop everywhere.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What happened to the city’s safe injection sites? The mayor announced them in May of 2018, but none have opened. Activists that gathered outside Cuomo’s Manhattan offices are blaming the governor for intentionally delaying the state’s mandated review of the program. (Gothamist)

Did you talk shit about Amazon after they announced their Long Island City HQ2 plans? If you did, you’re probably in a secret “NY Negative Statements” dossier the company kept. (Gothamist)

The Notorious B.I.G., but in Funko Pop form. (Brooklyn Vegan)

What the Dodgers meant to Brooklyn. (Brooklyn this Week)

The New York Fire Department forced a Muslim firefighter to shave his beard in violation of his religious beliefs, according to a new lawsuit. (Patch)

15 trendy restaurants you can get into. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for May 30, 2019 – The “I Don’t Have to Talk to You” Edition

Transgender activists will get a monument, a prison may become luxury apartments, this week’s commute from hell, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is getting safer, but pockets of Brooklyn are seeing spikes in violence. Is gang activity to blame? (NY Times)

“I don’t have to talk to you.” Why did Brooklyn Community Board 1 buy that $26,000 SUV? It doesn’t matter, because now the story is about Community Board 1’s district manager Gerald Esposito’s outburst when questioned about it at a board meeting this week. (The City)

One of the benefits of going to school at NYU is that you also get to live in one of the country’s most expensive rental markets. Oh what, that’s not a benefit. (Patch)

The Staten Island Wheel is the city’s zombie project. Now that it’s been dead for months, the city’s Economic Development Corporation is meeting with a new developer to work on the 630 foot tall Ferris wheel. (6sqft)

Electric scooters are still illegal, but rent-by-the-minute mopeds have arrived in Long Island City, Astoria, and multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods. (LIC Post)

We have the mayor mayor, the night mayor, and soon we may have the bike mayor. (Streetsblog)

If you’re a fan of events like The Squirrel Census, the Great Fish Count is looking for volunteers across the city. (6sqft)

Is this pole dancing rat the work of the enigmatic Zardulu? (Gothamist)

More on Zardulu. (Reply All)

In a move that seems too perfect for the nightmare dystopia the city’s real estate has become, a former prison in Harlem may soon become a series of luxury apartments. (The Root)

A guide to the city’s only observation decks. An easy guide because it comprises of all of them. (Curbed)

The “mechanical void” loophole has officially been closed by the city council. The short version of it was that developers were adding mechanical space in the middle of buildings to get around zoning laws to make the upper floors of their buildings as high as possible. (Curbed)

Three men were found guilty of “a sort of insurance fraud on steroids” that made them $31 million richer until they were caught. (Gothamist)

This week’s commuting hell belongs to 79th St, where the MTA closed all but one exit, causing overcrowding and five trainloads of people unable to leave the station. (Gothamist)

A few weeks after City Hall transferred city-owned land in the Bronx to a developer and approved $12 million in financing for an affordable apartment complex, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s political action committee received a $25,000 donation. (The City)

Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, pioneering transgender activists who were at the vanguard of the gay rights movement, will be immortalized in a monument that may be placed down the street from the Stonewall Inn. (NY Times)

Netflix’s mini-series on the Central Park Five is released on Friday, and with it will bring a flood of stories about the men at the center of the controversy and how they were targeted, hated, and abused by the city they called home and more specifically Donald Trump. (NY Times)

First, it was Trader Joe’s and now Whole Foods is following suit. 8 of the city’s 12 Whole Foods will stop making deliveries outside of what they refer to as the “walking zone” near their stores and are pushing customers to otherwise use Amazon’s ‘Prime Now’ app instead of visiting the store at all. (Tribeca Citizen)

Where to eat, but mostly where to avoid, at Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Governor Cuomo does not have any plans to lighten his grip on the state and just started his third term. He announced plans to run for a fourth term in office. The last governor of New York to serve four complete terms was George Clinton, New York’s very first governor in 1777. (Patch)

Katz’s is having a ‘When Harry Met Sally’ fake orgasm contest on the 30th anniversary of the film’s release. If you’ve been training for this your whole life, this is your moment. (Eater)

40 ideas for a birthday party for an adult. Calling it an “adult birthday party” sounds like it involves pornography. (Grub Street)

Can we have one week without someone intentionally trying to sabotage the subways? (Gothamist)

Tourism is up in the city and has taken Broadway’s box offices with it. 2018 was the ninth straight year of growth in the number of tourists, who make up 63% of the total 14,768,254 people attending Broadway shows, paying $1.8 billion for tickets. Other factors in Broadway’s growth include longer running shows, a wider variety of shows and a higher volume of them as well. And Hamilton, which grossed $165 million in ticket sales. (NY Times)

Infinity in a Tiny Room is an art show that takes place in an apartment, and no, this is not in Bushwick. (Patch)

The best Thai restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 6, 2019 – The “Oh No, He’s Actually Going to Run for President, Isn’t He” Edition

The mayor’s Vision Zero program is beginning to fail, the best tacos, Jagged Little Pill plans to bring people to theaters, teens attacked by acid, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes and diversions are minimally awful. (Subway Changes)

A review of Decade of Fire, playing at the Metrograph, which tackles the topic of the burning of the Bronx in the 70s and the organizations that rallied to rebuild when no one else would. (Curbed)

Oh god. He’s actually going to run for President, isn’t he? (Splinter)

How to spend 12 hours on Governors Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jagged Little Pill, which may actually be a bad album, is coming to Broadway on November 3 at the Broadhurst Theatre. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The 10 oldest libraries in the city and their secret histories. (Untapped Cities)

Some teens threw a raucous party in the basement of an NYCHA development. The party ended when someone poured an acid-like liquid onto them from above. (NY Times)

Some people are happy with laundry machines in their building. Others get a million dollar yacht, who Rolls-Royces, a Lamborghini, a Hamptons house rental for a summer, and courtside Nets season tickets. Yes, all of those amenities are for one apartment. Welcome to the wildest luxuries for city homes. (Patch)

RIP Lew Fidler. Fidler was a Brooklyn politician, who was a champion for homeless youth in the city council, the environment, and LGBTQ youth. (Politico)

The top twelve brunch spots in the city. Let this serve as a reminder if you want to go anywhere for brunch this weekend. Mother’s Day approaches. (Patch)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants and bars. (amNY)

Scenes from the Union Square cannabis parade and rally from Saturday. (EV Grieve)

It took six years, but the Office of Emergency Management has unveiled lower Manhattan’s solution against a Hurricane Sandy-like storm has arrived. They’ll use… sandbags. Really big sandbags. This took six years. (NY Times)

Margaritaville is a state of mind, but it’s also going to be a resort on the corner of 40th and Seventh Ave. (New York YIMBY)

Katz’s has survived New York since 1888 and New Yorkers have survived Katz’s enormous sandwiches for just as long. I’ll have what she’s having. (Food Insider)

Mark your calendars, November 9 will be Wu-Tang Clan Day, and to celebrate you’ll be able to go to the corner of Targee Street and Vanderbilt Avenue in Staten Island, which is the Wu-Tang Clan District as of this weekend. (The Root)

RIP Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown, who died over the weekend due to Parkinson’s disease complications. Brown was the Queens District Attorney for nearly thirty years and had been on the judiciary since 1973, who had been on a leave of absence from the job since March. (QNS)

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, whose decisions are helping destroy the Amazon and whose racism, homophobia and bigotry tops any racist uncle you’ve got on Facebook, will skip the NYC gala in his honor after it had become clear that New Yorkers will tolerate a lot of punishment, but hosting him is a step too far. (NY Times)

Breathe easy, literally, if you take the L train, the first dust report is in and the concentration of silica dust is well below the benchmarks for dangerous exposure. (NY Times)

BreakfastClub founder and author of BREAKFAST: The Cookbook shares her favorite breakfasts in the city. (Time Out)

Where to have a graduation lunch or dinner. (The Infatuation)

It seems that Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero program has begun to fail. (amNY)

Youfeng Xu was killed crossing Seventh Avenue with the light in Sunset Park, the person behind the wheel of the truck was charged with failure to yield to a pedestrian and failure to exercise due care. (Streetsblog)

A three-year-old boy was killed while in a crosswalk in front of a stop sign by a van in Bath Beach last week on a street that the city has known to be dangerous for at least five years. The driver blamed the child’s death on his mother. (Gothamist)

Candy. Where do you get it? Anywhere? Wrong. You get it at Economy Candy. (ABC 7 NY)

Senior citizens outnumber millennials when it comes to renting apartments. (NY Times)

An ice cream parlor for humans and dogs. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Here’s how New York’s proposed voter affiliation deadline change could help Bernie Sanders in the 2020 presidential election. (Gothamist)

35 outstanding tacos in NYC. (Eater)

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