The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “A Love Letter to the Salt Bagel” Weekend Edition

Fighting this weekend’s planned ICE raids, more people are staying put in Brooklyn and Queens, the city’s speed camera program starts to expand and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The president’s ICE raids scheduled to take place this weekend have included New York as a target. The governor announced anyone in need of assistance may contact the Liberty Defense Project via the New York State New Americans Hotline at 1-800-566-7636 or liberty@dos.ny.gov.

What should you do if ICE is at your door or the door of someone you know? Here are the ACLU’s guidelines and outlines of your rights. (ACLU)

The Amazon Web Services Summit at the Javitz Center drew crowds protesting Amazon’s involvement with ICE with their Rekognition Video system. (amNY)

Riding the subway still sucks, but it sucks the least its sucked since 2013, with an on-time performance over 80%. (Curbed)

Check the trains before you venture out this weekend. This is the last weekend of reduced L train service before the multi-week night and weekend partial shutdown starts and remains through January. (Subway Weekender)

R. Kelly was arrested by the NYPD and Homeland Security in Chicago on federal sex trafficking charges and is expected to be brought to New York to face those charges. (NBC New York)

A love letter to the salt bagel. (Eater)

The NYPD claims to have figured out the reason for an uptick of shootings in northern Brooklyn: District Attorney Eric Gonzalez. The NYPD is blaming a program where weapons-possession offenders can plead guilty and take part in an educational program instead of being jailed. Putting the blame on this program has two flaws. The program is a decade old, the uptick in shootings are only in one portion of the borough while the program is borough-wide, and it does not apply to anyone who has used a gun, only those possessing them. (Brooklyn Paper)

Have mannequin, will carpool. A hero from New Jersey was pulled over on the Verrazzano Bridge for trying to using his “friend” as a reason to use the HOV lane. (Gothamist)

The photos your friends post to Instagram from Storm King are nice and all, but have you thought about who’s job it is to mow the grass? Meet Mike Seaman, who leads a seven-person crew. (NY Times)

Much like Williamsburg, the neighborhood it calls home, the Feast of Our Lady Mount Carmel and San Paolino di Nola is changing with the times. For the first time organizers opened up the carrying of the giglio, a four-ton and 72-foot-tall spire, and a life-size sculpture of a boat, to outsiders. This Sunday is giglio Sunday. (NY Times)

Irving Plaza is closed for eight months to be renovated. (EV Grieve)

The city provides about 146 square feet of green space per resident, which is smaller than a 12 foot by 12-foot room. Of the fifteen major cities in the story, New York was dead last. (Patch)

Speaking of green space, Shirley Chisholm State Park can lay claim to the title of “the city’s nicest park built on top of a toxic dump.” (Curbed)

In reflection of its 20th year, Untapped Cities sat down with Friends of the High Line co-founder Robert Hammond to discuss his favorite places in the city, future public projects, the Spur, and more. (Untapped Cities)

The latest step in a neighbor-feud in Kew Gardens is a bloody splattered mannequin who seems to be daring neighbors to call 311 against it. A truly amazing amount of pettiness. (Gothamist)

The expansion of the city’s speed camera program kicked off this week. The city will add 40-60 cameras a month until the number reaches 750 from the current 140. (Curbed)

“Slave Play,” a look at race relations through the prism of the sexual hangups of three interracial couples, is coming to Broadway this spring and will run for 17 weeks. (NY Times)

The reunited The Misfits announced their first-ever show at Madison Square Garden, tickets are on sale next week. (BrooklynVegan)

How Darren Walker, a gay black man who grew up poor in Texas, came to be one of the best-connected people in New York City. And what that means for the future of philanthropy. (NY Times)

A photo gallery of Coney Island through the years. (amNY)

The Parks Department publicly apologized to the family of Robert Sommer, who was one of the fifteen cyclists killed by drivers this year, for removing his memorial ghost bike in Marine Park without notifying his family first. (Brooklyn Paper)

Would you pay $275 to be a guest on a podcast? Say what you want, but it’s working for Uluç Ülgen, the host of mürmur, a podcast that is “part performance art, part social documentary, part mystical, and part comedy.” If you don’t want to pay the fee to appear, you can always subscribe on iTunes. (Bedford + Bowery)

A taxi jumped the curb and crashed into a Westville in Hell’s Kitchen on Ninth Avenue Westville. Five people were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and three declined medical attention. No reason was released for the driver’s actions. (Gothamist)

The Washington Square Park “Die-In” to bring attention to the crisis created by the failures of the mayor’s Vision Zero program has worked. Nearly every media outlet in the city has written about it, and it has now received the New York Times treatment. (NY Times)

More and more people in Brooklyn and Queens are choosing to renew their leases instead of moving to new apartments. Rants in both boroughs are up, but rents in Queens are down 4.2% since May. (The Real Deal)

Mia Simmons, the 20-year-old woman charged with manslaughter for the stabbing death of 30-year-old Latanya Watson, was defending herself according to her lawyer. Video footage shows the pair fighting on the platform and Simmons’s lawyer claims Watson was the aggressor. (Gothamist)

An Ed Sheeran pop-up shop will be open on Wooster Street today from 3:06 through 9:06. Now you know where to go or where to avoid, depending who you are. (amNY)

Say hello to the Carrot Dog, the humane twist on the New York staple, which are now available ay by CHLOE. Delightful, disgusting, or both? (Gothamist)

Whoops, the Time Out Market in Dumbo was shut down by the Department of Health. The food hall is expected to be reopened shortly. (Eater)

The MTA’s rules restrict the kinds of secondary jobs its workers can hold, which three dozen violated by moonlighting as Lyft /Uber drivers without agency permission. Five were fired. (Patch)

The governor won’t sign a bill that would loosen restrictions on affidavit ballots that would also retroactively decide the contested Queens DA race. (Jackson Heights Post)

After the arrest of Tyresse Singleton for the alleged burning of rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge in Harlem, a new set of flags are proudly waving. (amNY)

A look inside the bribery and corruption of two men who are partially responsible for the current taxi medallion financial crisis. (NY Times)

Everyone has a friend who always chooses the most expensive restaurant possible and the bill for the eight of you looks like someone’s rent instead of a bill for the meal. That’s the inspiration behind the list of the best restaurants for affordable group dinners. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 18, 2019 – The “Where Subway Cars Go When They Die” Edition

Broadway’s phantom pooper, the abandoned subway tunnel, a pre-K strike, the 7 train continues to fall apart, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late-night subway inconveniences. (Subway Changes)

A look inside the Hudson Yards’ Instagram-bait ‘Snark Park.’ (Gothamist)

Where do subway cars go when they die? They’re dumped into the Atlantic Ocean to become artificial reefs. There are thousands of cars at the bottom of the sea. (6sqft)

One of the two unions representing the city’s pre-K teachers voted to authorize a strike if demands for higher pay are not met. (Chalkbeat)

The federal government dropped their case against the NYCHA now that a monitor has been put in place. (Patch)

The city’s students joined the Global Climate Strike on Friday, inspired by Swedish student Greta Thunberg’s weekly protests. (Gothamist)

Pour out a moldy container in remembrance of the restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health this week. RIP Steinway Street Taco Bell/Pizza Hut. (Patch)

Are you ready for a months-long Industry City rezoning fight? Community Board 7 and City Council member Carlos Menchaca are laying the groundwork for an exhaustive review of how the rezoning would alter the neighborhood. (Curbed)

Kew Gardens’ Community Board voted unanimously against Mayor de Blasio’s 29 story 1.9 million square foot community jail plan. (QNS)

The Hudson Yards has already become part of the city. (@jccoltin)

If you’ve got a spare $25 million lying around, there’s a 26 room mansion on the Upper West Side for sale. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Watch seven years of construction on the Hudson Yards in less than three minutes. Who doesn’t love a time-lapse? (EarthCam)

If you thought real estate was expensive above ground, prices below are to die for. (NY Times)

We’re #1! NYC is the city with the most inadequate housing in the country. (Patch)

Was there a connection between the release of a Gotti from prison and the murder of a Gambino family boss? (NY Times)

More than 40 buildings in Manhattan have their own zip codes. Why? (amNY)

At this point, just don’t stand, drive, or exist under the 7 train’s tracks at any point. It happened again on Friday afternoon. (NY Post)

The Citizen app is a must for New Yorkers. Here’s how it works. (NY Times)

The mayor promised 100,000 jobs all paying more than $50k a year. Two years later no one knows how many jobs were created because the city isn’t keeping track. (NY Times)

Forcible touching, persistent sexual abuse, and public lewdness are all misdemeanors, which is why the subways are seeing multiple offenses from the same set of offenders. (NY Post)

There’s an abandoned wood-burning steam locomotive that runs tunnel underneath Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, which pre-dates the Civil War. One man is convinced that the diary of John Wilkes Booth is buried down there, but no one has stepped inside for nearly a decade. (Newsweek)

The Infatuation’s brunch hit list was updated. Get some reservations or else you might be waiting an hour for that mimosa. (The Infatuation)

Who is Broadway’s mystery pooper? (NY Post)

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The Briefly for March 7, 2019 – The “Mayor de Blasio Unsuccessfully PEGs the City Budget” Edition

The NYPL is getting a makeover, 248 city buses got graded and it wasn’t pretty, Industry City is starting to sound a lot like Amazon, where do the RHONY live, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Control over the MTA has always been central in the political city vs state fight. Governor Cuomo put his chips on the table by clearly stating if the city wants control of the MTA, they’ll lose the $10 billion the state contributes to the MTA. (amNY)

The New York Public Library is getting a $317 million makeover. (Curbed)

New York really tries hard to hide police misconduct records from the public. The Legal Aid Society created a searchable database of 2,300 lawsuits filed against the city since 2015. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio instituted a Program to Eliminate the Gap (PEG) for the city’s budget. The PEG is meant to cut $750 million from the city’s budget. The mayor’s budget increases the budget by $3 billion and the City Council isn’t pleased. (Gotham Gazette)

How to avoid the bait and switch encroaching into more and more rent agreements. (Thrillist)

Where do the women of RHONY live? Do they live places? Let’s find out. (StreetEasy)

A one-year-old boy rode the 1 train from 96th to 34th after his caretaker suffered a medical episode and was separated from the infant. The caretaker is a family friend and the family won’t press charges. (Gothamist)

A list of all the best new things to eat in New York.(Grubstreet)

After being open since 1977 and months of speculation, Moishe’s Bake Shop on 2nd Ave has closed. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The city’s restaurants, and all restaurants, are free from Mario Batali. Batali, who has more claims of sexual harassment against him than he has crocs, has dissolved his partnership and his old partners have formed a new company without him. (NY Times)

Maybe he can make himself some pizza dough cinnamon rolls to console his sadness. (Everywhereist)

Buying? Renting? What does your numerologist say? (6sqft)

Every beat cop, sergeant and lieutenant are now equipped with body cameras. (NY Post)

George Washington brewed beer, and you don’t believe that you can see his beer recipe in the New York Public Library. (Atlas Obscura)

Residents are fighting the city’s plan to replace the Elizabeth Street Garden with a housing project. A non-profit fighting the development claims the city’s environmental study wasn’t thorough enough, which seems like a good tactic to buy time. (Curbed)

248 city bus routes received grades. Only 1 got an A. (Patch)

“We haven’t spent $850 million. We’ve only spent, by the end of June, we’ll have spent $560 million.” Chirlane McCray’s Fox 5 interview didn’t go as planned. (NY Post)

If you’re under the 7 train in Sunnyside, the sky is falling. More debris fell from the elevated track and this time it hit a moving car. (Sunnyside Post)

The guy who started the Prince Street Pizza knockoff will soon be running the 140-year-old White Horse Tavern. (Eater)

The City Council passed a bill that would allow the Department of Buildings to issue stop work orders to “reckless” developers. (QNS)

Industry City is using Amazonian-like language in expressing their disappointment about their rezoning requests. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca is threatening to kill the rezoning unless the process is delayed. (Curbed)

Watch a cop ride a seized bike past a school without wearing a helmet, lose control, crash, and walk away with a limp before abandoning the bike. (Daily News)

Rape charges were dropped against two Brooklyn cops who admittedly had sex with a teen girl while she was under arrest and handcuffed in their police van in 2017. The cops say that the sex was consensual, the woman disagrees. (NY Post)

It was a miracle on the E/F in Kew Gardens. A woman fell onto the tracks and the train couldn’t stop. She survived by lying on her back between the tracks and the train passed right over her. Don’t try this at home. (QNS)

Canarsie is not amused by the 40 ounce water bottle shaped like a 40 of malt liquor. “Get Ounced?” More like “Get Out.” (Brokelyn)

A judge ruled that the MTA must install elevators as it renovates subway stations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, no matter the cost. Unless technically impossible, it is now legally required. (Politico)

The state’s budget is full of Governor Cuomo’s non-fiscal initiatives, like making it illegal to ride in the backseat of a car without a seatbelt and closing three prisons upstate.

Is it time to install LED lights on the sidewalks to prevent pedestrians with their heads in their phones from getting ruined by vehicles? (Bowery Boogie)

The five best pancakes in the city. (Thrillist)

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