The Briefly for March 4, 2020 – The “Worst Restaurant in NYC Right Now” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on the spread of coronavirus in NYC, Robert Durst’s trial, the best pho, Spike Lee vs James Dolan escalates, another L train meltdown, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 53˚
Clear throughout the day.

Can you name every NYC location in the new Dirty Projectors music video? (Dirty Projectors)

The city’s master plan for the Sunnyside Rail Yards calls for the creation 100 percent affordable housing with 12,000 homes, 60 acres of new open space, equitable home ownership opportunities, the long-sought Sunnyside Station and necessary infrastructure and other public amenities on a publicly controlled site equal in size to Roosevelt Island or six times the size of Hudson Yards. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Here’s what’s happening and what you need to know with the city’s crackdown on food delivery apps. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

It was once thought to be the foundation of a Seneca Village house, turns out it was just a sandboxed from the 1930s. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The headline is enough: Salt Bae Burger Is The Worst Restaurant In NYC Right Now. Beautiful. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The NY Post used a photo of an Asian man in Flushing, Queens to accompany its article about a confirmed case of coronavirus in Manhattan. While nothing the NY Post does should surprise us any longer, they keep finding ways to exceed even our very low expectations. (Carlotta Mohamed for QNS)

A second positive case of coronavirus in New York was found in a lawyer in Westchester with offices on East 42nd Street and whose children attend a Jewish high school in Riverdale. (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The private SAR Academy/High School in North Riverdale yeshiva has been closed as a precautionary measure to prevent further spread. (NY1)

You’ve got questions about coronavirus, here are answers from the mayor and infectious disease professor at Albert Einstein College in the Bronx. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know if you have fears of coronavirus on the subway. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The Department of Education attempted to show compassion to parents and students about coronavirus-related school absences and only managed to make things worse and more confused when it comes to what absences would be excused or if students with other illnesses wouldn’t have their absences excused. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

State Sen. Brad Hoylman wants to make it illegal for businesses to double or triple the prices for hand sanitizer, face masks and other medical products as New Yorkers hoard supplies during the coronavirus outbreak. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

How to prepare your home for a pandemic. (Localize.City)

There are a disproportionate amount of media professionals living within proximity of the Park Slope Food Coop and as a result it receives a disproportionate amount of attention. Here is your requisite Park Slope Food Coop members are overshooting because of the coronavirus article. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

From 2013: “We’ve Reached Peak Park Slope Food Coop Mockery.” (Jen Doll for The Atlantic)

The MTA has a long and storied history of being sued over subway accessibility. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

You saw “The Jinx” on HBO, here’s what you need to know about the trial of Robert Durst. (Charles V. Bagli for NY Times)

The L train had another morning commute meltdown on Monday. Cool. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

RIP Matvey Natanzon, a.k.a. Falafel the Backgammon King. (Sam Roberts for NY Times)

The MTA is not allowing workers to wear masks during their shifts to try to prevent the public from freaking out. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

There might be no one that loves the Knicks more than Spike Lee, and even he announced after a run-in with owner James Dolan he won’t be attending any more games this season. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

“I’m not leaving.” Angry Spike Lee is all New Yorkers. (@espn)

New York City is challenging a ruling by a State Supreme Court judge that would reduce the height of a 51-story Upper West Side condo tower. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

If you are waiting for your $100 Global Entry refund after New Yorkers were booted from using the program, you’re not alone. Refunds were supposed to be processed “automatically” on February 6 and everyone is still waiting. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: A 10,350-square-foot, 17-room $28.5 million duplex on the Upper East Side, a discount since the last time it was listed. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Don’t go pointing toy guns from any rooftop in the city. You will be arrested like this guy from Brooklyn. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The company behind the installations of the LinkNYC kiosks owes the city tens of million of dollars, hasn’t installed nearly the number kiosks they promised, and has come up short of advertising money. The city is considering suing the company to enforce its contract.

New York could be the first state to adopt a Crash Victims Bill of Rights. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

28 top spots for pho. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thank you to the dedicated reader who wanted to remain anonymous for today’s featured photo at Lenox and 125th.

The Briefly for February 13, 2020 – The “Are We Ready for an NYC Yang Gang?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo negotiates for the Trusted Traveler Program to return, Pennsy is closing, a spiked seltzer festival is coming, the Knicks are worth too much, and more

Today – Low: 30˚ High: 48˚
Light rain until evening.

Pennsy, the food hall attached to Madison Square Garden, is closing at the end of the month. The closure is part of a renovation of the area by Vornado Realty Trust, the landlord, and extend the first four floors of the building. Hiding in this news the announced closure of The Cinnamon Snail, the amazing vegan eatery with fantastic desserts, for good. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

What the hell is going on at Etiquette in Williamsburg, a cafe and bar that features a queen-sized bed. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Photos: Jeff Leatham’s Kaleidoscope at the New York Botanical Garden Orchid Show, which adds light installations and sculpture to the show. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

2021’s mayoral candidates think we need more education about ranked choice voting. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Will the math add up for Andrew Yang to run for mayor? (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Governor Cuomo seems to have come to an agreement with the Trump administration that would allow New Yorkers back into the Trusted Traveler Program without giving the federal government unfettered access to the state’s DMV records. (Azi Paybarah and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The NYPD arrested a journalist for filming an arrest of a man in Chinatown. It is 100% legal in NYC to photograph or video record anything that is happening in public, including police actions, as long as you’re not in the way. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

NYC is coronavirus free! All suspected cases were negative. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: Backstage at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. (Photos by Milo Hess for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Momo, the city’s hospital system’s very good first resident therapy dog. (Lydia Hu for NY1)

Here comes the city’s first ever spiked seltzer festival on May 16. Oh boy. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

The inside story of the long, slow, and painful death of Fairway. (Hannah Howard for Grub Street)

Come on restaurants, post your menus with prices online. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

How to make a reservation in NYC. It’s not always as simple as opening an app. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

These are the city’s top high schools, with Trinity High School coming in at #1 overall and Stuyvesant as the top public high school. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

With a seven season losing streak, the Knicks have been a very bad team for a long time, but that doesn’t seem to impact their value. The team was valued at $4.6 billion, making it unlikely that someone is rich enough to take the team from James Dolan’s grubby hands. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

The R-42 subway cars have been retired from service after fifty years years of use. (NY1)

Photos: The last ride for the R-42s with a cameo from Train Daddy Andy Byford. (Sydney Pereira, photos by David “Dee” Delgado for Gothamist)

Tension surrounding Morningside Park has not eased since the murder of Tessa Majors. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Video: A walk over the Brooklyn Bridge, through the city’s ugliest subway station, and Battery Park. (Action Kid)

Lawyers representing undocumented immigrants are fighting to stop ICE officers from making arrests at courthouses, which they say are interfering with court cases. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

There is a potential battle in Albany brewing over bail reform, with Governor Cuomo saying the door is open for possible changes, some state senators have jumped on the opportunity to voice their displeasure with the bill they passed last year before anyone has had time to properly judge its repercussions. Albany will always find a way to fight with itself. (Zack Fink for NY1)

When Mario’s Pizza on Arthur Avenue in the Bronx opened in 1915, the biggest concern was World War I, 100 years later it’s still going strong. (The pizza place, not the war) (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Debutante Balls still exist in Manhattan. (James Barron and Elizabeth D. Herman for NY Times)

The 38 best beer bars in NYC. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Mackenzie for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for February 10, 2020 – The “NYPD Declares War on Mayor de Blasio” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The brokers’ fees mess, NY sues the federal government over the Truster Traveler Programs ban, AOC’s BEC, touristy restaurants that are good, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 49˚
Light rain throughout the day.

Photos: The Pet Fashion Show. (Gabe Herman, photos by Milo Hess for amNewYork Metro)

New York City is better than any other city. Why? Everyone has their reason that makes New York their city. For Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, as we discovered on Desus and Metro one of the reasons is the bacon, egg, and cheeses. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

It doesn’t matter if it’s Chicago Pizza, California In-N-Out, or New Jersey laughably calling itself the pizza capital of the world, New York doesn’t care if you think your food is better. It’s not. (Serena Dai for Eater)

High Maintenance came back to HBO on Sunday, here is a list of filing locations. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A man shot two police officers on Sunday in the Bronx in targeted assassination attempts. There is currently no known connection to any protests or politics and the man, Robert Williams, was out on parole since 2017, pre-dating recent reforms. Williams’s son was shot and killed in the street and according to Williams’s grandmother he “never got over it.” He surrender himself to the police. (Elisha Brown and Michael Levenson for NY Times)

In response to the shootings, the Police Benevolent Association’s message to the mayor was straight forward. “The members of the NYPD are declaring war on you!” and “This isn’t over, Game on!” Oh boy. (Sanjana Karanth for HuffPost)

Because nothing is easy, real estate agents are trying to find every last way around the new Department of State guidance about broker’s fees. Most of the confusion they are creating is who they work for. Does the broker represent you or do they represent the landlord? Check your paperwork. (Jake Offenhartz and Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Real Estate Board of New York will, of course, try to stop the guidance with a lawsuit. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

An overview on what’s happening with broker’s fees. (Localize Labs)

A look and some recent history of the city’s protest murals. (Yoonji Han)

Photos: Scenes from the Golden Gauntlet Graffiti Battle. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The City Council is taking a look into ghost kitchens, with the possibility of wanting oversight over them, specifically if they prove to be unfair competition against real restaurants. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before. On Friday morning, a water main broke on Broadway, flooding the immediate area and causing all varieties of chaos. This third break in four weeks was at 110th. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor’s “fix” for the crumbling NYCHA, the Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program, may be putting the apartments that are a part of the program into an even worse predicament. Apartments under the RAD program are no longer under the oversight of the city and federal monitor. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

RAD is a national program enacted in 2012 that allows public housing agencies to switch the way they get money from the feds — moving from Section 9 (the way NYCHA-owned properties have historically been funded) to Section 8 (a program that funds private landlords). (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Play around with interactive charts showing the most popular and most money-making Broadway shows of the past 20-some odd years. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

amNewYork Metro has “3 ideas for a Knicks rebrand.” All three of them are basically “make it the 90s again.” (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s what the proposed 900-foot tall tower that will be built on top of Macy’s in Herald square will look like. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

You’ve got the rest of the week to “Name A Roach” at the Bronx Zoo. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Does the city need another stadium? Your answer doesn’t seem to matter, the N.Y.C.F.C. are close to moving forward with a plan to put a brand new soccer stadium a few blocks south of Yankee Stadium. There is an affordable housing component to the deal as well that will no doubt please the mayor and help ram this project through the city’s approval process. (David Waldstein for NY Times)

While the coronavirus isn’t a welcome addition to the city originating in China, hot pot restaurants are a different story. (Tony Lin for Eater)

Where to eat in the city’s Chinatowns. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Wired: Fearing the flu. Tired: Fearing the coronavirus. (Adam Nichols)

New York will sue the Trump administration over the Truster Traveler Programs ban, arguing the government’s decision was arbitrary, violate’s the state’s covering immunity, and was (not a real quote) “a dick move.” (Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

The MTA is planning to connect the Livonia Avenue L station and the Junius Street 3 station in Brooklyn by 2024. (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Chinatown’s Lunar New Year Parade. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Another story about how some city officials want to push the BQX forward, but this was included for a great photo of a board in a meeting asking for feedback, full of Post-It notes saying things like “NO BQX.” (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

Video: A walk through the Bronx. (ActionKid)

Caroline Baumann, the director of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in Manhattan, abruptly quit on Friday with no explanation given as to why. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

The XFL is here (again) and The New York Guardians won their first game. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

13 touristy restaurants that are actually good. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to @directorchick for today’s featured photo!