The Briefly for August 27, 2019 – The “End the Gifted Programs to Desegregate the City’s Schools” Edition

This winter will be a tough one, a ghost kitchen haunts Soho, the 7 train destroys a morning commute, officials want answers about the BQE and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Why can’t New York be a modern city? The answer lies in the billion-dollar fiefdoms controlled by city and state agencies and can be illustrated by a simple dog walk. (New York Mag)

Another person was killed by a driver on Coney Island Avenue. A 40-year-old man was lying on the sidewalk near a parking garage when he was run over by someone pulling into the garage a little after midnight on Monday. This is the fourth person killed on or near Coney Island Avenue this year. (Streetsblog)

This week marks the 243rd anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn, the first battle of the Revolutionary War. Ten spots to mark the anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn. (Untapped Cities)

A panel of experts has a recommendation on how to end segregation in the city’s schools: close all the gifted programs. (NY Times)

If you’re someone who keeps a spreadsheet of the best food in Chinatown (I know more than one person who does this), strike Yee Li, formerly New Big Wang, from the list. After 33 years on the corner of Elizabeth and Bayard, the restaurant is closed but lives on in spirit at the family’s new restaurant, New Yee Li, on Fort Hamilton Parkway in Brooklyn.

Surprise! A broken rail on the 7 train ruined Monday morning’s commute on the 7, E, M, F and R trains. (Gothamist)

Photos and more photos from Afropunk (Gothamist and Brooklyn Vegan)

If you’re wondering what’s going on with the replacement of the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade, you’re not alone. Multiple city and federal officials signed onto a letter looking for answers from the Department of Transportation. (Curbed)

A ghost kitchen is coming to Soho. Zuul, literally named after Zuul the Gatekeeper of Gozer from Ghostbusters, will house multiple restaurants who will only offer delivery. Sweetgreen, Junzi, Sarge’s, Naya, Stone Bridge Pizza & Salad, and POsitive Foods have already signed on. There is no restaurant, only Zuul. (Eater)

The Farmers’ Almanac has made their predictions for winter 2020 and you’re really gonna hate this. “With colder-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast and above-normal precipitation expected, our outlook forewarns of not only a good amount of snow, but also a wintry mix of rain and sleet—especially along the coast.” They are also predicting an extended winter and a slow start to spring. (Patch)

Today is PSL day in Starbucks across the country, but get ready for the Pumpkin Cream Cold Brew, the latest abomination destined for success. (Grub Street)

The Kosciuszko Bridge will open on Thursday, four years ahead of schedule, and bring with it pedestrian and bike lanes. (Curbed)

A state Supreme Court Judge upheld the state’s ban on religious exemptions to vaccinations for all children in public or private schools, put in place after the measles outbreak this year. The plaintiffs plan to appeal the decision. (Gothamist)

Arthur Schwartz, the lawyer leading the legal arguments against the 14th St busway who likened people protesting him to “white hooded zealots,” has compared Jane Jacobs’ fight in the ’60s against Robert Moses to his fight against “our millennial version of Robert Moses” Polly Trottenberg. Trottenberg, who graduated from Barnard College in 1986 and is not a millennial. (The Villager)

Statues for Equality by Gillie and Marc bring statues of ten women to Sixth Avenue on the anniversary of women getting the right to vote. (Untapped Cities)

Despite the president’s tweet that the federal government is working to extend the Q train to 125th St, nothing has been done by the Trump administration to prove his words remotely true. (6sqft)

Why do some buildings allow roof access and some do not? (Street Easy)

The overall number of overdose deaths in the city is down, but the Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan all saw increases. Rates are down among black and white New Yorkers but are up among Latinos. (amNY)

Taylor Swift’s “Cornelia Street” on her new album mentions the townhouse she rented in Greenwich Village. Take a look inside. (Curbed)

Would you believe that the NYPD Detective Darryl Schwartz, who is being sued for allegedly making bogus DWI arrests in order to earn extra overtime, has a history of misconduct? (Gothamist)

Anyerson Delacruz-Rosario was arrested in the Dominican Republic for his part in trafficking hundreds of thousands of packets of heroin and fentanyl to New York City. (Patch)

The lawsuit against the Central Park West bike lane appears to be in jeopardy as the building who filed the suit is facing internal challenges against it and possibly violated state law with the filing. (Streetsblog)

A tribute to the 99 cent pizza slice in the form of a new mural by City Kitty. (EV Grieve)

The best lunch spots in Midtown. (Thrillist)

Thanks to Baily Crawford (@blycrawford) for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 7, 2019 – The “A Bizzaro World Financial District” Edition

Gun violence in the city is up, the 14th St busway can move forward, James O’Neill says the decision about firing Daniel Panteleo is difficult, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Tiffany Cabán conceded to Melinda Katz in the Queens DA primary. (amNY)

National Grid is denying new service for restaurants in the city who need natural gas until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation approves a natural gas pipeline that was rejected over water quality concerns in May. (Bedford + Bowery)

If you read the quotes about the Financial District in this Times article about the “Village-like quality” to it, Next Wednesday’s news will be saturated with child sex abuse lawsuits. Under the Child Victims Act, adult victims of child sex abuse will have one year to file lawsuits as the age to file changes from 21 to 55 moving forward. Catholic dioceses, the Boy Scouts, hospitals, and schools are all expected to be on the receiving end of hundreds of lawsuits. (Gothamist)

A woman in Queens’ complaints about her state trooper neighbor’s air conditioner resulted in her being arrested twice and strip-searched, according to a lawsuit against the neighbor, 14 members of the NYPD, and the city. (Patch)

When Bill de Blasio’s daughter moved to Gracie Mansion from an apartment in Brooklyn, she had help from her personal NYPD security detail. According to Citizens Union, having police detectives assist in this would be a violation of the city’s Conflicts of Interest Law. Another violation to add to the growing pile. (NY Times)

Portions of the old Kosciuszko Bridge are being used to form an artificial reef off Fire Island as part of the state’s artificial reef program. Also buried at sea was pieces of the Staten Island Expressway. (Untapped Cities)

Barneys filed for bankruptcy and will close 15 of its 22 stores, but its Madison Ave store will remain open. (NY Times)

It was the focus of a 30 Rock Episode (“Sun Tea” S04E06) and countless other sitcoms. Is it okay to combine two apartments? (StreetEasy)

An NYPD sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two fellow officers, claiming he was told to “go back to where you belong” and that they prevented his career from advancing due to his age and nation of origin. (Gothamist)

On August 8, Burger Kings across the city (and country) will make the Impossible Whopper available for purchase. Where else you can find the Impossible Burger in the city. (Grub Street)

An NYPD judge recommend he be fired, there have been protests for five years calling for his firing, the speaker of the city council has called for his firing, the governor says he should be fired, you can add Elizabeth Warren’s name to the list too, but NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill calls his decision about the cop who used a banned chokehold against Eric Garner that resulted in Garner’s death a “difficult decision.” (Politico)

Special education should be taken from the Department of Education and moved into the oversight of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to Bronx City Councilmember Andy King. The resolution follows 7,500 due process complaints against the DOE and a lawsuit against the DOE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The restraining order against the 14th St busway has been lifted and the city will move forward with its 18-month pilot program on August 12. (Gothamist)

City Councilmember Costa Constantinides is calling for the MTA’s pilot program of installing netting under aging and elevated trains in Queens to be expanded to the entire elevated stretch of the N and W lines. There have been multiple reports of falling debris and construction ephemera, including the car that was impaled on Roosevelt Ave by a wooden beam. (Curbed)

Murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny, and auto theft are down 4% across the city this year, but gun violence is up over 5%. (Patch)

De Blasio scored an impressive 6%, but not in voters who would prefer him as a presidential candidate. 6% of people say he was the worst performer during the Democratic presidential debates. His support is still below 1%. (Politico)

Self-driving cars at the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched, but not without a minor mistake. One of the vehicles reversed into another car. The kicker? It was being driven and was not in self-driving mode at the time. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

NYPD school safety officer Edward Peterson was arrested for allegedly forcing a teenager to perform oral sex on him back in 2013. (Bklyner)

Contact with the NYPD may be bad for your health. Poor physical and mental health, hypertension and binge drinking are all more prevalent among people who have been abused by police, put behind bars or on probation or parole than those who have not, according to a report by the city’s Department of Health. (Patch)

The Metropolitan Opera and Conductor James Levine settled their lawsuit over Levine’s firing after multiple allegations were made of sexual misconduct. The settlement was out of court, so no details are known. (NY Times)

Do you have an idea of how to improve the city’s waterfront? Bring your ideas to a Waterfront Planning Camp on Governor’s Island on August 17 from noon to 4. (amNY)

A guide to surviving the summer in Williamsburg. (6sqft)

The Briefly for May 7, 2019 – The “Would You Jump in the East River to Save a Dog?” Edition

The #RethinkLinkNYC campaign, the Met Gala, the target on de Blasio’s back, the Kosciuszko Bridge is ahead of schedule, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Riad Nasr and Lee Hanson’s Frenchette in TriBeCa was awarded the James Beard award for Best New Restaurant. (NY Times)

While the good people of New York City, his friends, and anyone with common sense don’t want Mayor Bill de Blasio to run for president, he is none of those people. Even if he does make the decision, his questionable fund-raising tactics, and the subsequent investigations into them will be the first speed bump on his way to not becoming president. (NY Times)

While the Rethink LinkNYC campaign isn’t throwing bricks at the LinkNYC kiosks, it is educating pedestrians about the three cameras that are always recording and the questionable nature of who can access those images. (EV Grieve)

The trade for the LinkNYC kiosks is supposed to be revenue for the city, right? The 55-inch screens across the 1,800 kiosks will fall $34 million below projections for the first five years of the program. (Gotham Gazette)

High drama in the East River as a local hero jumped off a pier to save a dog who decided to take an unannounced swim. (Gothamist)

Photos from the 2019 Met Gala. (NY Times)

Here’s a rundown of the nine bills advocates are pushing forward in the state legislature that, when packaged together, are termed “universal rent control.” (The Indypendent)

A look at the After Hours Project, a community-based syringe exchange and harm reduction program, a social and mental health services provider, an opioid treatment facility and provides additional services as well. (Bushwick Daily)

The most beautiful places to get married in the city. (Curbed)

The city’s first new marina in fifty years will be in Brooklyn Bridge Park. The ONE˚15 marina will house over 100 boats up to 200 feet in length. (6sqft)

Housing 20,000 bees on the roof of The Shops at Fresh Meadows is, as the original headline explains “best for bees-ness“. (QNS)

Five of the most unusual places in Brooklyn. Make your own jokes. (Untapped Cities)

Add this to your nightmare file: A 22-year-old woman fell from her apartment’s roof on East 25th Street while taking photos of the skyline. She’s alive, partially because she landed in the building’s trash area. (Gothamist)

NIMBYs, they’re everywhere! Park Slopers say the city wants to “pit the working class people of this city against the homeless,” due to plans to partner with a nonprofit shelter to provide 253 apartments for homeless New Yorkers. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look back twenty years ago at Giuliani’s administration “of, for, and by white people.” (Village

The plans for four “neighborhood” jails that will replace Riker’s Island will each be reduced by at least 10% to better integrate the buildings to the neighborhoods that will be housed in. The number of inmates is currently around 7,400 but is expected to drop to 4,000 by 2027. (The City)

Manhattan and Brooklyn are among the fourth and seventh most bike-friendly places in the country, according to PropleForBikes’ second annual city ratings report. (Curbed)

One of the joys of warm weather in the city is discovering how many places use goats to cut their grass. Add Riverside Park to the list, as 24 goats will “work” through August 30 between 119th and 125th Streets. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Patch is on the allergies in the city beat, showing the next week is going to be particularly rough for those of us who feel personally attacked by the city’s flora. (Patch)

There are a lot of stories about how Louis CK is not allowing people to record any of his material without his consent, which is tragically funny on one hand, but on the other hand, do not go to see Louis CK perform comedy. This city is full of hundreds, if not thousands, of comedians. (BrooklynVegan)

Three-year-old Zoey Pereira’s death is being investigated as a homicide. Her father was seen running from a car which burst into flames, which had been chained shut with two gas canisters and a propane tank in the trunk. Her father was taken into custody for questioning. (NY Times)

Add the Macy’s Fourth of July fireworks to the list of things which aren’t coming to Long Island City. The Brooklyn Bridge was chosen as this year’s location. (LIC Post)

Farewell to the original Essex Market, which is officially closed after 79 years. (Bedford + Bowery)

The Kosciuszko Bridge’s second span will open in September, years ahead of schedule. No specific opening date was set. (amNY)

How does a street pretzel compare to an authentic German Bretzel? (Viewing NYC)

The Durst Organization is lobbying the city to add a new NYC Ferry line between Astoria and the Upper East Side. This might have to do with the seven residential towers the organization is opening in Astoria. (Curbed)

14th Street’s The Blind Pig will be closing on May 18 after the landlord imposed a 50% rent hike. The site is currently listed at $300,000/month. (EV Grieve)

From a 1970 bedroom to throwing axes, from secret rooms to Oscar Wilde, 15 unique bars in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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