The Briefly for May 1, 2020 – The “Are We The City That Sleeps Now?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the UHaul full of bodies in Flatlands, the Bronx gets its first Krispy Kreme, a QAnon believer is arrested in Manhattan, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 62˚
Rain until evening.
This weekend – Low: 56˚ High: 73˚

The story behind Frank Sinatra’s version of “New York, New York,” how it saved his career, and how it almost never happened. I still maintain that the Sinatra version should only be played at Yankee Stadium when the Yankees win. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

There has never been a better time to go vegetarian, as New York City may be looking at a possible meat shortage. Even the idea of a meat shortage may lead to one, as people will begin to overbuy meat. (Ron Lee for NY1)

The subways will shut down between 1 am and 5 am every day so every subway car can be disinfected. Buses will continue to run. Overnight service will be back when “customer demand returns.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If it seems stupid to close a 1,000-acre national recreation area from the public in order to park 100 MTA buses, you’re right. The Gateway National Recreation Area is working to allow members of the Floyd Bennett Gardens Association access to their gardens, but the mayor is one of the voices calling for the reopening of the former airfield. (Jose Martinez and Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

11 excellent burgers, available for takeout or delivery. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

The City Council approved the conversion of a former Jehovah’s Witness hotel into a 500-unit affordable housing complex in DUMBO. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

A little bit more on the bodies found in a truck outside a Flatlands funeral home. A 911 caller reported they were seeing “blood coming from one of the trucks.” The NYPD said the 15 bodies had been in the non-refrigerated truck for over a week, but no crimes had been committed. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

The Pegu Club in Soho, regarded as “one of the best bars ever” by Grub Street, is closing for good. Their lease was up in October, but they couldn’t make it through the temporary closure during the pandemic. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Cocktail hour, which could be any hour as time has lost all meaning, is back. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times)

21 top-notch Thai restaurants still open in NYC. (Dan Q. Dao for Eater)

The Bronx has its first Krispy Kreme. At this point, who doesn’t need a load of sugar? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A look inside the New York City Archaeological Repository for the city’s earliest pottery. A wild thought for a city that considers an alley where The Ramones once hung out in the 70s a piece of history. (Justin W. Thomas for Untapped New York)

NY Attorney General Letitia James is calling on cable companies to provide financial relief to consumers until live sports programming is resumed. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The mayor says the NYPD will enforce social distancing, and this time he means it, even if he’s said this multiple times now. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The story of Colleen and Ian Bock and the Acre, the restaurant in Ridgewood she was almost ready to open right when everything went to hell. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Advocates are hoping to see one million New Yorkers participate in today’s rent strike, hoping to put pressure on the governor to take immediate action for rent relief and prevent evictions down the line. (Davin Gannon for 6sqt)

The city is distributing 100,000 free face coverings in parks across all five boroughs, starting as early as this weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Disability Rights New York is suing the governor for not including an American Sign Language interpreter at his daily press conferences. The governor’s office responded that ASL versions of the daily press conferences are available on the web. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

The city’s Small Business Services has issued $8 million in loans to small businesses but is disproportionately providing 66% of the available loans to Manhattan businesses. Businesses in the Bronx have received $80,000 in loans, only 1%, but has seen 23% of the city’s positive COVID-19 tests. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you have a car that you haven’t used in a while, maybe it’s time to check the engine for rat colony. (Caity Weaver for NY Times)

Farewell to the USNS Comfort, which treated 182 COVID-19 patients while it was in New York. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

IKEA is working with the Queens Borough Presidents’s office to donate about 14,000 products to Queens-based non-profits and shelters. (Michael Gordan for Queens Post)

School food service employees, who are doing the work to distribute millions of meals to NYC, say they’re not adequately protected or acknowledged for their exposure to the public. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

An Illinois woman was arrested in Manhattan carrying 18 knives and other weapons in her vehicle after she allegedly threatened Joe Biden, and Hillary Clinton. Jessica Prim, who goes by Kimita Steel online, was broadcasting on Facebook Live when she was arrested by the Secret Service, spouting QAnon bullshit conspiracy theories and headed towards the USNS Comfort. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“I am eligible,” declares a governor to all Cuomosexuals. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deep and leveled look at what makes it so difficult for the city’s messaging about staying safe and social distancing to penetrate the Hasidic and Ultra-Orthodox communities and why de Blasio’s singling them out publicly in the manner that he did only stands to make the problem worse. (Elad Nehorai for HuffPost)

The photographers who are capturing an empty New York City, creating a powerful and eerie set of images we never thought we’d see. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Are you one of the New Yorkers re-creating famous book covers inside your home? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to get affordable takeout. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 30, 2020 – The “So Many Non-Coronavirus Ways to Die” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Krispy Kreme is coming back to NYC, impeachment cakes, the NYPD wrote more moving violation tickets to cyclists than truck drivers in 2019, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 38˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

12 contenders for a NYC subway mascot. (Ben Yakas with illustrations by Matt Lubchansky for Gothamist)

The Lunar New Year Chinese Temple Bazaar in Queens was canceled over coronavirus fears, despite New York having no confirmed cases. (Joseph Goldstein and Jeffrey E. Singer for NY Times)

Worried about Coronavirus? Don’t be. The flu killed 5,000 Americans in the first two weeks of the year. (Buzzfeed)

If you live in NYC, you can request a Department of Transportation bike corral by filling out a form, even for a residential building. (@jeffnovich)

The NYPD issued more moving violations to bicyclists than truck drivers in 2019. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

In reaction to the Clearview AI mess with the NYPD, State Senator Brad Hoylman proposed legislation that would outright ban on biometric technology use by police on a city level, a bill is being pushed that would require the NYPD to disclose every surveillance tool it employs. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The city collectively passed a ballot measure to expand the power the Civilian Complaint Review Board has to oversee the NYPD. In response, the NYPD is suing the city to prevent the change from happening. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Harlem neighborhood that Langston Hughes praised in 1944 is still one of the ‘best-kept secrets in New York.’ But it’s not quite as affordable as it once was. (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

According to Mayor Bloomberg, New York City “isn’t trying to be the lowest-priced product in the market.” Now the city is full of empty luxury apartments, because oligarchs don’t have the same kind of money that they used to. (Cory Doctorow for Boing Boing)

Krispy Kreme is coming to Times Square with a 24 hour 45,000-square-foot store and it’s bringing five more NYC locations with it. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

What happened with Fairway in Red Hook? According to their landlord private-equity ruined the store. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

15 places to find vaulted Gustavino tiles in the city. (Shirley Mgozi Nwangwa for Untapped New York)

Should New York public schools teach climate change? Wait, climate change isn’t taught in New York schools? (Scott Enman for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Hey, did you buy a lottery ticket and not check it? Two Take 5 tickets were sold and they’re each $29,249 winners. Go check your pockets. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Alamo Drafthouse in lower Manhattan was supposed to open in 2018, then it was supposed to open in 2019, now it’s been postponed until summer of this year. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

It’s been ten years since it was declared a superfund site, but the long-awaited cleanup of the Gowanus Canal officially has a start date, and it’s in September. (Devin Gannon or 6sqft)

The city paid Childrens Community Services half a billion dollars to provide homeless services since 2017, but there’s only one problem. It appears that the nonprofit doesn’t exist. (Nikita Stewart for NY Times)

Someone’s been spotted stealing the Spotted Pig’s pig. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The website for The Villager, one of the media brands inside the Schnepps empire, has been eaten by amNewYork Metro. The Villager was already the home for The Villager, Chelsea Now, Downtown Express, and Manhattan Express. Consolidate, consolidate, consolidate. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Brooklyn bakery Butter & Scotch sent 53 sheet cakes to Washington with various messages to encourage Republican senators to allow John Bolton to testify int he impeachment trial of Donald Trump. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Dozens of Rise and Resist members grouped themselves at Grand Central during the peak of rush hours, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Monday night, for a vocal demonstration, sparked by the impeachment proceedings on speed and lack of witnesses. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Brooklyn may seem like a liberal’s paradise, but politics within the borough’s Democratic party is becoming less transparent as leaders voted to hold fewer meetings and restrict member-driven resolutions. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The famous hot chocolate from City Bakery is getting a second life with founder Maury Rubin’s The Wonderbon Chocolate Co. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The team behind Brooklyn Bazaar is bringing a new restaurant within McCarren Park inside the restored bathroom building. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The most beautiful interiors in New York City, mapped. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Nothing says “punk rock” like a limited edition pair of Doc Martens with the CBGB logo stamped on them. (BrooklynVegan)

After the Knicks shit the bed (again) on Wednesday night, the entire Garden broke out in a “sell the team” chant aimed at team owner James Dolan. The Knicks are 13-36 and have had a using record 16 if the last 19 seasons. (Dan Bernstein for The Sporting News)

Video: A look at People and Animals Living Safely (PALS), a non-profit that provides a safe space for human and animal victims of domestic abuse. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has big plans for 2020, which include work on making nine subway stations ADA compliant, spending a billion dollars on signal upgrades for the A, C, and E lines, improving the 7 and F tunnels, station improvements along the J and Z lines, and working on extending the Q train to 125th St. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Shaun Donovan, a former secretary of Housing and Urban Development in the Obama administration, is planning to run for mayor of New York. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

The City Council is imagining the future of Rikers Island, with an emphasis on creating renewable energy and a waste water treatment plant is a possibility. (Gloria Palzmino for NY1)

There are 1,400 buildings whose facades have been determined to have major structural problems and are a serious threat to pedestrians, hundreds with no protections for pedestrians. Those buildings have racked up $31 million in unpaid fines from the city. (Matthew Maah for NY Times)

39 holiday happy hour deals in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 11, 2019 – The “The Pizza Wars of New York Are Getting Saucy” Edition

14th St will become a busway in July, the mayor’s nemesis is a 16-year-old teen, New Yorkers support ending the measles religious exemption, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Two Bridges towers are at the center of a legal battle, centered around the developers’ attempts to work around the city council and the land use review procedures. (Curbed)

Respect to whoever was able to cover an entire Q train with graffiti extremely quickly without being caught. (@JMartinezNYC)

Welcome to Soho, or as the Times puts it, “CBD stores and face-mask pushers are going to destroy us all.” (NY Times)

The Brooklyn Pizza War of 2019 has only just begun. L&B Spumoni Gardens is opening up a DUMBO outpost mere steps from Grimaldi’s and Juliana’s. May the best slice win. (Eater)

It appears that Robert De Niro is on the verge of building a movie studio in Astoria. (QNS)

A correction from yesterday (thanks Harry!), the apartment building planned for the former Hell’s Angels clubhouse will be 22 apartments, not 22 stories. (Curbed)

Tiffani Torres is 16, a twice-caller on “Ask the Mayor” on WNYC, an activist with Teens Take Charge, and a thorn in the mayor’s side. She’s correctly criticized the mayor for his DOA presidential run distracting him from city business and has been vocal about the systemic issues facing the city’s schools. Is it too late to elect her mayor? She sat down for an interview with the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Does Times Square need a 24-hour, multi-story “immersive” Krispy Kreme with a theater and, no I’m not kidding, a goddamn “glaze waterfall?” Of course it does. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Pride Parade took over Park Slope last weekend with heavy splashes of color, celebration, politicians, and remembrance of the Stonewall Riots half a century ago. (Brooklyn Paper)

Layleen Polanco, a 27-year old transgender woman, was found dead at Rikers Island on Friday. Polanco was a member of the House of Xtravaganza (get yourself up to speed on Ball Culture) and was arrested in April for assault and possession of a controlled substance. (Patch)

The city council scheduled a hearing to look into accusations against Grubhub (who owns Seamless), as well as Uber Eats, Doordash and the like, from restaurants accusing the company of charging fees for customer calls that never resulted in orders. (Eater)

10 of the best running spots in New York City, even if I think saying the High Line is a great place to run is like saying the Brooklyn Bridge is a great place to bike. (6sqft)

A helicopter crashed into AXA Equitable Center in Midtown, killing the pilot. Have you noticed how many helicopters are constantly flying around Manhattan? Manhattan has three public heliports and this was the second crash in less than a month, but that doesn’t seem to slow down the $800 trips to the Hamptons or the new service to take people to JFK Airport. (NY Times)

“Oh, you’re a girl, I thought you were a guy,” is an auspicious way to start a job somewhere. A chef is suing Hudson Yards Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, claiming she was fired for being a woman. (Eater)

With the Stop Violence in the Sex Trades Act, New York has a path to become the first state to decriminalize sex work, even in the face of criticism from the governor, the mayor, and Corey Johnson. (Patch)

The NYPD are arresting turnstile jumpers. The officers have wide latitude to decide who they arrest and who they ticket, so it should become obvious very quickly that people of color will be arrested at a higher rate. In 2019 people of color represent 87% of people arrested for farebeating. exact numbers aren’t known because the NYPD is refusing to comply with a court order demanding them to disclose these numbers. (Gothamist)

The conversation about rent control has gotten so muddy and opaque it’s hard to know if this article which says that mom-and-pop landlords may decide to sell their buildings if rent reform passes, is steeped in the truth or has roots in one of the many astroturfing campaigns from larger landlords and developers. (amNY)

New Yorkers overwhelmingly support the end of religious exemptions for the measles vaccine. Overwhelming is 85%, which includes more than 80% support from the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant populations polled. There’s a bill in the state’ legislature as you read this, but there is only a week left in the legislative session until summer recess. (Patch)

St. James Place in Bed Stuy is now Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” Wallace Way. (amNY)

Congrats to Gothamist on their site redesign. (Gothamist)

The perfect time for a sci-fi radio show is after midnight when everything is quiet and your imagination is ripe for exploration of its dark recesses. The “Hour of the Wolf” has aired between 1am – 3am on Thursday mornings since 1972. Helmed by Jim Freund, the show has had nearly every writer of importance on the show, the first U.S. broadcast of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and whose website was originally a collaboration with Tim Berners-Lee, the literal father of the world wide web. A living piece of broadcasting history on Atlantic Avenue. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 14th St busway will arrive on July 1, drastically changing traffic and (hopefully_ speeding up the buses. (amNY)

32 great places to eat something kind of healthy for dinner. (The Infatuation)

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