The Briefly for August 30, 2019 – The “Celebrations Have Already Begun” Labor Day Weekend Edition

Holiday weekend subway changes, closed streets for J’Ouvert and West Indian Day Carnival, bringing a dead squirrel on the subway, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The first Labor Day celebration took place in Manhattan 130 years ago. (amNY)

Street closings and timings for this year’s J’Ouvert festival and West Indian American Day Carnival. (Curbed)

This weekend is the last big weekend for the Hailstone icehouse in Crown Heights, as they sell ice like it’s going out of style, 40 pounds at a time. (NY Times)

What’s open and closed for Labor Day weekend. (Patch)

This weekend’s weather is looking pretty comfortable. (amNY)

The change from L train shutdown to slowdown is nearly doubling the project’s cost. (Curbed)

Step inside of Sweet Afton and you’ll feel like you’re inside a Wes Anderson movie. It wouldn’t be far from the truth, because the bar’s redesign was put together by Kris Moran, set designer for Moonrise Kingdom. (Time Out)

NYCHA General Manager Vito Mustaciuolo is under investigation for harassment. An expose in the Daily News outlined his misbehavior. The NYCHA hasn’t said if he will continue working full-time while the investigation proceeds. (Patch)

It’s that time of year again: New York Fashion Week starts next weekend. (amNY)

Squirrels can be cute, but bringing a dead squirrel onto the subway is not cute. (Patch)

A look at the rejected ballots from the Katz/Cabán primary in Queens and how easily Katz’s 55-vote lead could have been easily erased. (The Indypendent)

Put Stan Lee on New York’s new license plate, you cowards! (Bronx Times)

A preview of Portal: Governors Island, an art fair which opens on Governors Island this Saturday. (Gothamist)

Where to eat and shop in Hell’s Kitchen. (amNY)

The five-day celebration of J’Ouvert has already begun. (Street Easy)

Brooklyn’s first Chick-fil-A is accused of trying to poach workers from local businesses. (Patch)

The City Council is being accused of trying to bury a public meeting about the plan to replace Rikers Island with four “community” jails by scheduling it on the hectic first day of school. (Queens Eagle)

The number of city classrooms with lead-paint hazards has doubled after a set of inspections, bringing the number to 1,858. The city says all the affected classrooms will be ready for Thursday’s first day of school. The Department of Education is supposed to inspect each classroom annually. (Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has failed to qualify for the next round of Democratic presidential debates in September. The mayor has already said he didn’t plan on dropping out of the race if he didn’t qualify. Mayor, what is so wrong with the city that you lead that you’d prefer to spend this much time away from it? (Patch)

Despite the law signed by Governor Cuomo last week barring them from state waters, the company floating billboards around Manhattan and Brooklyn’s shoreline continues to do so after finding a loophole in the language used in the law. The state has not enforced the new law with any citations. (Gothamist)

The case against Jeffrey Epstein was officially closed by a Manhattan federal judge. (Patch)

One of the hidden gems of the garment district is Acuario Cafe. How can you find it? There no signs and you can only find by walking through a freight elevator of an office building on 37th St. (Viewing NYC)

Do you know about the IFC’s secret peephole? (Bedford + Bowery)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge bike lanes make riding across the bridge easy. Getting to the bridge on a bike? Much more difficult. (amNY)

Two former NYPD Detectives who were initially accused of raping an 18-year-old woman in their custody have pleaded guilty to receiving a bribe and “official misconduct” for having sex with a teenager inside a police van after a traffic stop in Coney Island, and will only serve five years of probation. (Gothamist)

16 fantastic Filipino restaurants. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 17, 2019 – The “At This Point, Why Not Wait for Christmas?” Edition

CitiBike’s expansion, the best happy hours, the most expensive neighborhood, the government will not bring a case against Daniel Pantaleo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

New York City had a monorail, if only for a moment. Visitors to the 1964 World’s Fair were able to see the grounds in a 4000 foot looped monorail that was disassembled when the fair closed. Support pylons can still be seen in the ground in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. (Untapped Cities)

Who are Jeff Bezos’s new neighbors? Let’s find out. There’s a list at the end of the article if you want to skip down to it. (The Real Deal)

We have a winner, a Christmas tree being thrown out on July 16. (EV Grieve)

48 people were arrested while blocking traffic at 5th Ave and 42nd on Tuesday while protesting President Trump’s continued threat of ICE raids. (amNY)

Just finished anoter re-watch of Seinfeld and looking for a meal? If you want that classic diner experience, Queens is your borough. (QNS)

If you’ve wanted to take an up-close look at one of Tom Fruin’s Kolonihavehus glass mosaic water towers that are dotted around the city, one is on display inside The Shops at Hudson Yards. (Untapped Cities)

ConEd is celebrating turning the power back on in Manhattan with a victory tour of telling the public “sometimes blackouts happen in heatwaves.” Very reassuring. (6sqft)

The federal government will not bring charges for Daniel Pantaleo over the death of Eric Garner. NYPD Commissioner is the arbiter of Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial, which the police administrative judge has not yet rendered a verdict. “The D.O.J. has failed us,” -Mr. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr (NY Times)

The Department of Transportation’s “Safer Cycling” report in 2017 identified eight priority zones with insufficient bike infrastructure and deadly crashes. Since these areas were identified, the number of injuries in the priority zones have risen by 6.5%. (Streetsblog)

The driver of a box truck hit a cyclist in Park Slope on Fifth Avenue. The cyclist was either unconscious or unresponsive before being taken to Methodist hospital. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into why drivers and pedestrians seem to hate bicyclists. (Gothamist)

CitiBike officially unveiled their plans for expansion into the Bronx Ridgewood, Upper Manhattan, and deeper into Brooklyn. It’ll be a while for some neighborhoods with the expansion scheduled through 2023. (6sqft)

We The Commuters is celebrating Bike Week with a list of biking clubs across the city where the intimidation factor is low and the “we won’t leave you behind” factor is high. (Gothamist)

The play-on-words named Dig Inn has decided to change its name to questionable and no longer punny Dig. They argue “Dig has become more than a restaurant,” to which I argue “restaurants have table service.” (@diginn on Medium)

What to do in a power outage. These are practical tips, this isn’t a guide to entertain yourself. (StreetEasy)

Levain Bakery added a “secret” ice cream sandwich menu item, so if you’re looking to impress your friends who aren’t subscribers to The Briefly, this is your moment. (Gothamist)

A list of the dates where the L train is shut down overnights at ten stations throughout Brooklyn in July, August, September, October, and January. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for six weekends of partial to non-service as switches are replaced. (Curbed)

“My mother at Lincoln Towers at 69th and West End has no power also.” The New York Times published their Slack transcripts from the night of the blackout, because why not? (NY Times)

A farewell to Dean & Deluca. (Grub Street)

Giselle Burgess, the founder of the first troop designed for homeless girls in NYC Girl Scout Troop 6000, was elected to the board of directors of The Child Center of NY. (QNS)

As expected, two real estate trade groups have brought a constitutional challenge against the state’s rent reforms. Historically the Supreme Court has uphelf rent regulations. (NY Times)

Tribeca remains #1 in the city when it comes to home prices, with the median sale price in Q2 of 2019 being $4.34 million. The only neighborhood that comes close is Hudson Yards with $3.86 million. (6sqft)

Williamsburg has the more cases of the measles than any other neighborhood, but the list is 9 neighborhoods long and the total measles count rose by 1 in July to 623. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Tips for eating out in NYC with food allergies. (amNY)

The city’s “Nostalgia Ride” which goes from 96th St to Coney Island along the Q line in a 1917 BMT train will happen this Saturday. Be patient, the ride takes about two hours. (amNY)

Waitress will close on Broadway in January of 2020. (NY Times)

How much trash is on our beaches? Well, Parley for Oceans, the Department of Sanitations official non-profit group, with 170 volunteers picked up 1,200 pounds of trash from Rockaway Beach in two hours. (Gothamist)

The top happy hours in 25 neighborhoods. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for May 21, 2019 – The “Great White Sharks in NYC Waters” Edition

The city gets serious about Long Island City, the era of OMNY has arrived, the MTA cuts bus service and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The bill that would criminalize “texting while walking” is DOA. (Streetsblog)

“I told all my friends they’re never going to see me in the Staten Island Mall again.” (Curbed)

The new logo for privately owned public spaces was unveiled from 600 entries. It’s three chairs. (amNY)

Scared of sharks? A ten-foot long great white shark was spotted a few dozen miles from the city. Just in time for the holiday weekend! (Patch)

Right now students can get a half-priced MetroCards if they live within walking distance of their school. Students often wind up paying the remainder in coins, causing the bus system to grind to a halt. This is why the city wants to get rid of them in favor of free MetroCards, good for three rides a day from 5:30am to 8:30pm for school-related activities. (Patch)

A Brooklyn Community Board approved of a protected bike lane on Flatbush Avenue from Grand Army Plaza to Empire Blvd, mirroring Prospect Park West’s lanes. (Streetsblog)

The history of New York City’s original rooftop bars. (6sqft)

Punk Island added a slew of bands to the lineup of the free punk festival on Randall’s Island, with the addition of a stage whose goal is to raise awareness for mental health and drug addiction in addition to free Narcan training and distribution. (BrooklynVegan)

Photos from Saturday’s 13th Dance Parade in the East Village. (Gothamist)

Say hello to Summer Sucks, an ongoing series from Gothamist. (Gothamist, duh)

Where to get all dressed up and not feel stupid. (The Infatuation)

It seems that only now that Amazon’s HQ2 is a distant memory, city officials are getting serious about developing the Long Island City waterfront and this time around they’re including the neighborhood in the discussions. (The Real Deal)

The state’s Attorney General opened an inquiry into more than a decade of lending practices that left thousands of immigrant taxi drives in debt, while the mayor ordered an investigation into the brokers who arranged the loans. (NY Times)

No one wants to talk to Steve Doocy. (HuffPost)

The Vendy Awards, New York’s awards for street eats, will come to a close after 15 years. (Grub Street)

Attention. If you lost an absolutely gargantuan inflatable pink flamingo in the East River, it has been found. (Gothamist)

Idea: Buses can’t run late if there are no buses! The MTA is curring service on 13 bus lines this summer. (Streetsblog)

How’re the subways treating you? The MTA says they’ve hit a five-year high of being on time. The percentage? A solid C+ at 79.8%. (Sunnyside Post)

Welcome to the era of OMNY. (mtainfo)

Meet some of the 42 heroes who are fostering 90 kittens for the ASPCA. (amNY)

Four Department of Education executives claim that they are victims of “reverse racism.” (The Root)

Here’s a look at what’s open and closed on Memorial Day. (Patch)

A look back at the Coney Island that was, through the archive of the New York Times’ photography. (NY Times)

“I consider it a social experiment, I wanted to see how people would respond to this character.” The character the saran wrapped Shiva. (Bushwick Daily)

There has been an 82% rise in anti-semitic attacks in the city compared to last year. (Bklyner)

In light of the spike, Speaker Corey Johnson is calling on the mayor to fully fund the Office of Prevention of Hate Crimes, which was approved by the city council this winter. The mayor has only funded 70% of the office. (amNY)

A gang member who participated in the killing of 15-year-old Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz said that a mistake led to the attack. (NY Times)

The MTA reports that the L Train Slowdown is going as planned. Is anyone else tired of hearing about how resilient New Yorkers are? (amNY)

Congratulations to this year’s Obie Award winners. The Obies honor Off Broadway and Off Off Broadway work, and “What the Constitution Means to Me” was named best new American play. (NY Times)

“What is art,” you may ask yourself while looking at photos of slop buckets from a restaurant in Park Slope. (Viewing NYC)

24 ideal outdoor bars in the city. (Eater)

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