The Briefly for September 15-17, 2020 – The “Flesh Eating Bacteria? Who Cares, It’s 2020” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Industry City’s rezoning, the number of Covid-19 positive tests in schools increases, where to eat outside in Park Slope, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 68˚
Clear throughout the day.

This isn’t NYC specific, but Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren fired Police Chief La’Ron Singletary, demonstrating that some mayors know how and when to yield their powers. (Michael Wilson and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

Photos: Behind the scenes in Chinatown. (Molly Tavoletti for RESY)

New York City’s highways, reimagined in a subway map. (Zirocket on r/NYC)

We’re inching closer to normal because the F train is closing on nights and weekends for construction. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

It’s not all bad news for the subway, there’s a new escalator in Union Square on the L platform. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Five Connecticut residents were hospitalized with a flesh eating bacteria after going in the water in the Long Island Sound this summer” barely even was a blip on the radar. What a year. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Can you help identify this woman, who had a shitfit in a Verizon store when told to wear a mask, throwing around the N-word as she left the store? In a city with so many assholes, she still managed to be the asshole of the week and it’s only Tuesday. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Want to ride the subway or bus without a mask? Get ready for a $50 fine. Next question: Will they fine the NYPD when they ride without masks? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

NYU’s dorm Rubin Hall is on lockdown after 4 students tested positive for Covid-19. (Matthew Fischetti and Trace Miller for Washington Square News)

Photos: The “new” Chelsea Flea opened over the weekend. (Scott LYnch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn Public Libraries in Midwood, Kensington, Mill Basin, Walt Whitman, Washington Irving, and the Annex in Dumbo are open for grab-and-go lending. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The City Council will vote on the Industry City rezoning today. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, whose district contains Industry City, has come out against the rezoning. The City Council usually defers to the local councilmember for these decisions, but multiple members have come out against his stance. (Greg David for The City)

What’s happening to us? New York City’s zip codes don’t even touch the ten most expensive zip codes in the country. (Tim Moran for Patch)

Photos: Baby lynx cubs in the Queens Zoo! (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Cloister Cafe was shut down by the SLA in August du to social distancing violations by its patrons but reopened this week thanks to a temporary restraining order against the suspension by a judge. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The story of how the police unions, full of white Republicans who live in the suburbs, betrayed the city they are supposed to serve by endorsing President Trump. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

The year in (sad) photos. (Tribeca Citizen)

The NYPD takes a full minute longer to respond to shootings and other crisis incidents than they did a year ago. Ambulances are arriving faster than ever before. (Suhali Bhat for The City)

A new vegetarian burger spot, Pop’s Eat-Rite, is opening up a block from Superiority Burger. I, for one, look forward to this burgeoning vegetarian burger district. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Farewell to Coyote Ugly, whose original location is officially gone, but it sounds like a new location is coming. (EV Grieve)

Photos: I’ll never not link to photos of goats mowing the grass. (Forrest Michael Bomann for Untapped New York)

The MTA is betting big on the federal government bailing them out to the tune of $12 billion. The rest of us live here on earth. (Jose Martinez for The City)

The Thanksgiving Day Parade isn’t happening. Let’s just go take a nap until it’s 2021. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Want to ask the 2021 mayoral candidates a question? Here’s your chance. (The City)

This isn’t new, but sometimes I think about how Governor Cuomo said he changed his mind about the L train because someone yelled at him on the street. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist in 2019)

Satire: Help! I’m Being Priced out of the Neighborhood I Gentrified. (Graham Isador The Hard Times)

“Teaching has a powerful way of consuming your time that is antipode to the stay-at-home summer of 2020. I’m optimistic that the new school year will sweep away my grief — grief for the hardship and loss my students experienced these past few months, for not being there to offer hugs and high fives, for missing yearbook signing and graduation photo swapping, and for a lackluster farewell. I trust that the new school year will bring with it acceptance, even as I hold on to the wonderful young learners who have filled this classroom with laughter and wonder before.”
Krisy Lawlor, a teacher in the Bronx, My classroom is a time capsule , for Chalkbeat

Last week the number was 19, this week 55 school employees tested positive for Covid-19. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state threatened to cut 9,000 jobs from NYC school less than one month ago. (Reema Amin for Patch)

Monday, the mayor announced the city will hire 2,000 additional teachers to meet the demands of blended learning. 2,000 is extremely short of the 10,000 teachers the principal’s union called for to make blended learning possible. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

School nurses are reporting that they’ve yet to receive any PPE for the school year. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

42% of NYC students opted for remote learning, up from 26% a few weeks ago. (Lauren Cook for PIX11)

A look at the next Bowery Mural from Mojo, in progress. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Turns out New York’s most famous guitar teacher Dan Smith will still teach you guitar. A story of how Smith is teaching former Governor David Patterson to play guitar. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Expect a marketing campaign to persuade you to vote for Joe Biden under the Working Families Party, as without either 130,000 votes or 2% of the total vote, the Working Families Party will lose ballot access. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Park Slope. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Helene for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 11-12, 2020 – The “Let’s Eat Some Indoor One Dollar Sushi” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining is coming back to NYC, sixteen teachers test positive for Covid-19 before students come back, outdoor happy hours, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 81˚
Rain and humid throughout the day.

16 New York City teachers have tested positive for Covid-19 in 16 different schools. Schools open on September 21. (East New York News)

Photos: Inside the abandoned City Hall subway station, which served as the inspiration for the Turtles’ lair in the second Ninja Turtles movie. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times asks the impolite question: What happens when no one invites you into their quarantine pod? (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

September 30, indoor dining is back at 25% capacity. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Indoor dining will increase to 50% on November 1 if cases don’t significantly increase, just in time for outdoor dining to end on October 31. The state and city, of course, are giving restaurants less than a month to get their indoor areas ready and overhaul their HVAC systems. Many restaurants will have to make a choice is opening their doors at 25% capacity is financially worth opening their doors at all. (Erika Adams for Eater)

An epidemiologist weighs in on the question of how safe is indoor dining? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There’s a new Whole Foods in Brooklyn, but no one is allowed inside. (Chris Crawley for Grub Street)

Okay, let’s jump into this. Is dollar sushi any good? (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: A $5.75 million brownstone in Harlem with a secret garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Activists are calling on the MTA to fire two of their employees, Willion Wurm Jr and William Wurm, who drove through demonstrators near Times Square during a Black Lives Matter protest this summer. The MTA will not fire the employeees. (Stephan Nessen for Gothamist)

A look at the CDC’s eviction moratorium for tenants who can’t pay rent and make under $99,000 annually. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Farewell to the Hilton hotel in Times Square. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

What could make your commute worse between Bedford Ave and Manhattan? Someone who is FaceTiming the entire time. The L train tunnel is the first train tunnel to get cell signal. (Greenpointers)

Meet Jenny Olbrich, the Greenpoint’s Pizza Girl. (Greenpointers)

A look at the “For ⟶ forever” mural by Mierle Laderman Ukeles that’s on display outside the Queens Museum. (Jane Margolies for NY Times)

Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, and West Virginia were added to New York’s quarantine list for travelers. (NY1)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer officially kicked off his 2021 mayoral bid on Tuesday with a speech taking aim at the city’s real estate industry. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

It’s that wonderful time of the year again: It’s time for goats to cut the grass. (EV Grieve)

As the title says, “Everything you need to know about NYC’s Open Streets Restaurants program.” (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A 15-year-old Brooklyn boy was charged on Tuesday with five counts of attempted murder in a J’Ouvert shooting that left a 6-year-old boy, his mother, and three men wounded. (Ed Shanahan and Ashley Southall for NY Times)

James Gordon Bennett Medal is one of the FDNY’s highest honors, but it’s named for the published of The New York Herald newspaper, who pushed racist and segregationist views during the Civil War. The award will be renamed in honor of Chief Peter J. Ganci, who was the highest-ranked uniformed member of the FDNY killing in the 9/11 attacks. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Christian Cooper, the bird watcher who had the police called on him for insisting a dog be put on a leash. has turned his experience into a graphic novel about racism. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Did you miss the earthquake that happened early in the morning on Wednesday? Yes, there was an earthquake. Just toss it on the pile for 2020. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Angry Upper West Siders that threatened to sue the city after homeless shelter residents were temporarily moved into neighborhood hotels are celebrating the decision to move the 300 residents of one hotel back into traditional shelter facilities. NIMBY indeed. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Patricia Marroquin Norby is the Met’s first-ever full-time Native American curator and will assume the role of associate curator for Native American art. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

The Covid-19 pandemic hit NYC neighborhoods the hardest that were already experiencing the greatest rent burden, according to new research from StreetEasy. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Meet “Red Rage” Assistant Chief Christopher McCormack, who has the most credible misconduct allegations of any NYPD officer. Over a dozen Black and Latino men accused McCormack of touching them inappropriately during searches or ordered others to do so. Despite the complaints, he kept being promoted. (Joaquin Sapien for The City)

A guide to Central Park’s “Great Trees.” (Amanda Quaid for Untapped Cities)

Some gyms are open in the city, but indoor fitness classes remain banned. A group of boutique fitness studios is suing the city for $250 million in damages over the ban (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Ride the subway without a mask? $50 fine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Century 21 declared bankruptcy and will be closing its stores. (Christopher Bonanos for Curbed)

A new study from the CDC says adults with Covid-19 were twice as likely to say they ate at a restaurant. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán launched her campaign for City Council for district 22, which encompasses Astoria, East Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Rikers Island. If she wins her election, it would put her in control of rezoning Rikers Island after it has been vacated. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

The outdoor happy hour guide. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for April 28, 2020 – The “de Blasio Forced to Make Another Popular Decision” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NY calls off the presidential primary, the L train is back, where to get a fresh bagel, AOC supports rent strikers, looking at reopening and more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 61˚
Clear throughout the day.

Alt-side parking has been suspended citywide through May 12. (Norwood News)

How to watch today’s Blue Angels flight over New York City today. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

For every celebration, there’s always a buzzkill. Streetsblog is here to ensure you can’t enjoy some planes flying overhead today. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor has given in when it comes to opening streets to pedestrians and cyclists, announcing that 40 miles of streets will be opened up this month and an additional 60 miles will be opened up soon. the mayor deserves literally zero credit for this because the City Council backed him into a corner and Governor Cuomo said in his press conference that he supports opening streets up. Much like his presidential campaign, he was the last person to see that no one supported his position. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

The New York State Board of Elections canceled the June presidential primary, citing the June date as an opportunity to vote for actual elections and candidates and not for the purposes of issues at a convention, which was Bernie Sanders’s stated reason for not dropping out of the race completely. The Sanders campaign, as you could imagine, is ornery about the decision. (Brigid Bergin and David Cruz for Gothamist)

Also canceled was the special election for Rafael Espinal’s vacated City Council seat. Mad the election continued, voters would have had to vote twice on June 23, once in the primary and once in the actual election, and all for a single six-month term. Corey Johnson will manage the district while the seat is vacant. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

One thing that New York City will be known for after the pandemic is behind us is its inequality, which extends to a hospital system where Warren Buffet personally intervenes to get one hospital supplies and another made room for patients out of duct tape and plastic tarps. (Michael Schwirtz and Kirsten Luce for NY Times)

Most New Yorkers trust Governor Cuomo over President Trump when it comes to reopening the state according to a Siena College poll. I think most New Yorkers would trust my dog Pepper over the president when it comes to reopening the state. (NY1)

A closer look at the governor’s plan to dip New York’s toe into the waters of reopening. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s already hard enough to remove an emotionally disturbed customer from the subways who was chasing other riders around and trying to light subway ads on fire but add in COVID-19 fears and also he was naked. (Jose Martinez for The City)

The L train is back to full operation just in time for no one to care. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The Office to Combat Domestic Violence launched a chat and text service on Friday to help New Yorkers discreetly report domestic violence. The office is suggesting the number be stored until a fake name. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A case against the city’s gun laws came before the US Supreme Court, but by the time it reached the court city and state laws had changed, making the case moot. The case was dismissed by the court. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

New York City is looking to hire 1,000 medical professionals to serve as contact tracers as the city begins to plan its own reopening. The tracers will interview people who have tested positive in hopes of identifying people who may need to be tested or quarantined. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The Atlantic Boat Club in Crown Heights continued to serve customers after the shutdown and the state liquor authority has revoked their license. They face fines up to $40,000 and revocation of their liquor license. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Where you can still get a fresh bagel in NYC. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

A few weeks ago I came across someone’s Instagram story who was showing a group of vehicles that included cars, bikes, scooters, ATVs, and go-carts, which seems just as weird on a city street as you might think. Seems I wasn’t the only person to take notice of these vehicles in the street because the NYPD seized 20 off-road vehicles that were “terrorizing” the streets over the weekend. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

“Sir, this is a Wendy’s.” A man without a face mask caused $1k of damage to a Wendy’s in the Bronx. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

It’s weird to see Times Square so empty, but of course, the Naked Cowboy is still there. He’s like a roach in the apocalypse. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The New York Philharmonic is still playing together, even while separate. Watch and hear their latest performance of “Adagietto” from Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Now through May 25, Coney Island USA (the home of the sideshow) is running a mask design contest called “Put on a Funny Face” through May 25 with 11 different winning categories. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Success Academy Charter Schools will continue to use a traditional grading while the Department of Education is planning a new grading system for the remainder of the school year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Rent strikers have Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s support. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The delivery guide for a big night in. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!