The Briefly for April 28, 2020 – The “de Blasio Forced to Make Another Popular Decision” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NY calls off the presidential primary, the L train is back, where to get a fresh bagel, AOC supports rent strikers, looking at reopening and more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 61˚
Clear throughout the day.

Alt-side parking has been suspended citywide through May 12. (Norwood News)

How to watch today’s Blue Angels flight over New York City today. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

For every celebration, there’s always a buzzkill. Streetsblog is here to ensure you can’t enjoy some planes flying overhead today. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor has given in when it comes to opening streets to pedestrians and cyclists, announcing that 40 miles of streets will be opened up this month and an additional 60 miles will be opened up soon. the mayor deserves literally zero credit for this because the City Council backed him into a corner and Governor Cuomo said in his press conference that he supports opening streets up. Much like his presidential campaign, he was the last person to see that no one supported his position. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

The New York State Board of Elections canceled the June presidential primary, citing the June date as an opportunity to vote for actual elections and candidates and not for the purposes of issues at a convention, which was Bernie Sanders’s stated reason for not dropping out of the race completely. The Sanders campaign, as you could imagine, is ornery about the decision. (Brigid Bergin and David Cruz for Gothamist)

Also canceled was the special election for Rafael Espinal’s vacated City Council seat. Mad the election continued, voters would have had to vote twice on June 23, once in the primary and once in the actual election, and all for a single six-month term. Corey Johnson will manage the district while the seat is vacant. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

One thing that New York City will be known for after the pandemic is behind us is its inequality, which extends to a hospital system where Warren Buffet personally intervenes to get one hospital supplies and another made room for patients out of duct tape and plastic tarps. (Michael Schwirtz and Kirsten Luce for NY Times)

Most New Yorkers trust Governor Cuomo over President Trump when it comes to reopening the state according to a Siena College poll. I think most New Yorkers would trust my dog Pepper over the president when it comes to reopening the state. (NY1)

A closer look at the governor’s plan to dip New York’s toe into the waters of reopening. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s already hard enough to remove an emotionally disturbed customer from the subways who was chasing other riders around and trying to light subway ads on fire but add in COVID-19 fears and also he was naked. (Jose Martinez for The City)

The L train is back to full operation just in time for no one to care. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The Office to Combat Domestic Violence launched a chat and text service on Friday to help New Yorkers discreetly report domestic violence. The office is suggesting the number be stored until a fake name. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A case against the city’s gun laws came before the US Supreme Court, but by the time it reached the court city and state laws had changed, making the case moot. The case was dismissed by the court. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

New York City is looking to hire 1,000 medical professionals to serve as contact tracers as the city begins to plan its own reopening. The tracers will interview people who have tested positive in hopes of identifying people who may need to be tested or quarantined. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The Atlantic Boat Club in Crown Heights continued to serve customers after the shutdown and the state liquor authority has revoked their license. They face fines up to $40,000 and revocation of their liquor license. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Where you can still get a fresh bagel in NYC. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

A few weeks ago I came across someone’s Instagram story who was showing a group of vehicles that included cars, bikes, scooters, ATVs, and go-carts, which seems just as weird on a city street as you might think. Seems I wasn’t the only person to take notice of these vehicles in the street because the NYPD seized 20 off-road vehicles that were “terrorizing” the streets over the weekend. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

“Sir, this is a Wendy’s.” A man without a face mask caused $1k of damage to a Wendy’s in the Bronx. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

It’s weird to see Times Square so empty, but of course, the Naked Cowboy is still there. He’s like a roach in the apocalypse. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The New York Philharmonic is still playing together, even while separate. Watch and hear their latest performance of “Adagietto” from Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Now through May 25, Coney Island USA (the home of the sideshow) is running a mask design contest called “Put on a Funny Face” through May 25 with 11 different winning categories. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Success Academy Charter Schools will continue to use a traditional grading while the Department of Education is planning a new grading system for the remainder of the school year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Rent strikers have Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s support. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The delivery guide for a big night in. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 4, 2020 – The “Worst Restaurant in NYC Right Now” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on the spread of coronavirus in NYC, Robert Durst’s trial, the best pho, Spike Lee vs James Dolan escalates, another L train meltdown, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 53˚
Clear throughout the day.

Can you name every NYC location in the new Dirty Projectors music video? (Dirty Projectors)

The city’s master plan for the Sunnyside Rail Yards calls for the creation 100 percent affordable housing with 12,000 homes, 60 acres of new open space, equitable home ownership opportunities, the long-sought Sunnyside Station and necessary infrastructure and other public amenities on a publicly controlled site equal in size to Roosevelt Island or six times the size of Hudson Yards. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Here’s what’s happening and what you need to know with the city’s crackdown on food delivery apps. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

It was once thought to be the foundation of a Seneca Village house, turns out it was just a sandboxed from the 1930s. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The headline is enough: Salt Bae Burger Is The Worst Restaurant In NYC Right Now. Beautiful. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The NY Post used a photo of an Asian man in Flushing, Queens to accompany its article about a confirmed case of coronavirus in Manhattan. While nothing the NY Post does should surprise us any longer, they keep finding ways to exceed even our very low expectations. (Carlotta Mohamed for QNS)

A second positive case of coronavirus in New York was found in a lawyer in Westchester with offices on East 42nd Street and whose children attend a Jewish high school in Riverdale. (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The private SAR Academy/High School in North Riverdale yeshiva has been closed as a precautionary measure to prevent further spread. (NY1)

You’ve got questions about coronavirus, here are answers from the mayor and infectious disease professor at Albert Einstein College in the Bronx. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know if you have fears of coronavirus on the subway. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The Department of Education attempted to show compassion to parents and students about coronavirus-related school absences and only managed to make things worse and more confused when it comes to what absences would be excused or if students with other illnesses wouldn’t have their absences excused. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

State Sen. Brad Hoylman wants to make it illegal for businesses to double or triple the prices for hand sanitizer, face masks and other medical products as New Yorkers hoard supplies during the coronavirus outbreak. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

How to prepare your home for a pandemic. (Localize.City)

There are a disproportionate amount of media professionals living within proximity of the Park Slope Food Coop and as a result it receives a disproportionate amount of attention. Here is your requisite Park Slope Food Coop members are overshooting because of the coronavirus article. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

From 2013: “We’ve Reached Peak Park Slope Food Coop Mockery.” (Jen Doll for The Atlantic)

The MTA has a long and storied history of being sued over subway accessibility. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

You saw “The Jinx” on HBO, here’s what you need to know about the trial of Robert Durst. (Charles V. Bagli for NY Times)

The L train had another morning commute meltdown on Monday. Cool. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

RIP Matvey Natanzon, a.k.a. Falafel the Backgammon King. (Sam Roberts for NY Times)

The MTA is not allowing workers to wear masks during their shifts to try to prevent the public from freaking out. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

There might be no one that loves the Knicks more than Spike Lee, and even he announced after a run-in with owner James Dolan he won’t be attending any more games this season. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

“I’m not leaving.” Angry Spike Lee is all New Yorkers. (@espn)

New York City is challenging a ruling by a State Supreme Court judge that would reduce the height of a 51-story Upper West Side condo tower. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

If you are waiting for your $100 Global Entry refund after New Yorkers were booted from using the program, you’re not alone. Refunds were supposed to be processed “automatically” on February 6 and everyone is still waiting. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: A 10,350-square-foot, 17-room $28.5 million duplex on the Upper East Side, a discount since the last time it was listed. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Don’t go pointing toy guns from any rooftop in the city. You will be arrested like this guy from Brooklyn. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The company behind the installations of the LinkNYC kiosks owes the city tens of million of dollars, hasn’t installed nearly the number kiosks they promised, and has come up short of advertising money. The city is considering suing the company to enforce its contract.

New York could be the first state to adopt a Crash Victims Bill of Rights. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

28 top spots for pho. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thank you to the dedicated reader who wanted to remain anonymous for today’s featured photo at Lenox and 125th.

The Briefly for January 14, 2020 – The “AOC vs Cuomo, Round 2” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The AG looks at the NYPD’s subway fare evasion, how Tiffany’s moved hundreds of millions in jewlery, the head of Brooklyn’s democrats resigns, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 48˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

How do you move hundreds of millions of dollars in view of the public in NYC without getting robbed? Very carefully. Here’s the story of how Tiffany’s moved everything in its store overnight. (James Barron for NY Times)

Attorney General Letitia James announced on Monday that her office would investigate the NYPD and if its fare evasion policing in the subways has illegally targeted New Yorkers of color. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The winners and losers of the Queens bus network redesign. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Cuomo’s AirTrain is about to hit a new obstacle: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

There are thirteen million registered voters in New York state, with one million designated as “inactive,” and whose names were not on the voter rolls at election sites, which is a violation of the 14th Amendment and the National Voting Rights Act of 1993 according to a federal judge. While it may seem trivial, remember that the Queens DA race was decided by 55 votes. Moving forward, all registered voters’ names will be available at polling sites. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Information on how to register to vote.

The leader of the Brooklyn Democratic Party, Frank Seddio, is stepping down amid concerns about the party’s and his own finances. Seddio is facing $2.2 million in lawsuits and the party’s cash reserves have dwindled from $505,000 in 2013 to $32,800 in 2019. (Aidan Graham and Kevin Duggan for amNewYorkMetro)

Photos: When it comes to the city’s skies, birds usually get all the attention. Don’t forget the city’s bats. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

RIP Matthew Maher, owner of McSorley’s since the 60s. The bar is staying in the family, daughter Teresa Maher de a Haba is the owner now. (EV Grieve)

Here are the top ten checked out books in the NYPL’s history. You’ll notice a theme running through the list. “Goodnight Moon” did not make the list do to a personal vendetta against the book by children’s librarian Anne Carroll Moore. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Have you seen “The Geographic Center of NYC” in Woodside on the corner of 58th Street and Queens Boulevard? Besides being a cool piece of trivia it’s also completely wrong. If this isn’t the place, where is it? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

If your usual subway station is outdoors, the winters can be brutal. A century ago, the IRT provided potbelly stoves in stations for its riders to stay warm while waiting for the train. (Ephemeral New York)

Signal problems ruined about four out of every five morning commutes in 2019, according to a new Riders Alliance analysis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The L train showdown is running ahead of schedule and should be completed by April, but not without some weekend closures. The MTA announced the weekends of January 17, February 14, and March 20 with closures from 8th Av to Broadway Junction. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

In addition to the L construction, the MTA announced emergency overnight construction was necessary on the G train this week through Friday night from midnight to 1:30am. (Greenpointers)

On a dry day, the MTA pumps 13 million gallons of water from its system. Monday’s water main break added half a million gallons to that, causing chaos on the 4, 5, 6, A, B, and C lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s time to declare the days of the cooking competition celebrity chef over. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It started as an argument between two dads about their kids near Dyker Park, but it turned into a double stabbing. One was stabbed in the chest and neck and the other was stabbed in the leg. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

In terms of housing and transportation costs, NYC ranks tenth in the nation, right after Houston but right before Minneapolis-St Paul. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Baby Yoda has a mural in the East Village. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The plan to rezone Bushwick hit a possibly fatal roadblock Monday after city officials and local politicians failed to reach an agreement on affordable housing requirements. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The de Blasio administration testified at a 2019 City Council meeting that they did not have information about who was riding the heavily subsidized NYC Ferry system. The mayor used his insistence that the boats were being used by low-income New Yorkers as justification to dramatically expand the ferry system. It was all a lie, because the city’s Economic Development Corporation had already conducted two rider surveys that showed the median income of riders was over $100,000. For each rider on the ferry that pays $2.75, the city pays $9.34. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Vans opened Skate Space 198, a free indoor skatepark right off the Jefferson stop in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYCHA residents filed about 59,770 bug infestation complaints in the first nine months of 2019, according to the Legal Aid Society. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What’s the best pizza in NYC? In honor of National Pizza Week, Patch asked politicians, comedians, and Broadway stars where to get their favorite slice. It’s mostly unconventional picks for the city’s best, even if Chuck Schumer’s pick is one of the closest pizza places to his apartment. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mama’s Too, on the list, is rolling out a meatball parm that is already being described as “the city’s best meatball parm.” (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)