The Briefly for July 17, 2019 – The “At This Point, Why Not Wait for Christmas?” Edition

CitiBike’s expansion, the best happy hours, the most expensive neighborhood, the government will not bring a case against Daniel Pantaleo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

New York City had a monorail, if only for a moment. Visitors to the 1964 World’s Fair were able to see the grounds in a 4000 foot looped monorail that was disassembled when the fair closed. Support pylons can still be seen in the ground in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. (Untapped Cities)

Who are Jeff Bezos’s new neighbors? Let’s find out. There’s a list at the end of the article if you want to skip down to it. (The Real Deal)

We have a winner, a Christmas tree being thrown out on July 16. (EV Grieve)

48 people were arrested while blocking traffic at 5th Ave and 42nd on Tuesday while protesting President Trump’s continued threat of ICE raids. (amNY)

Just finished anoter re-watch of Seinfeld and looking for a meal? If you want that classic diner experience, Queens is your borough. (QNS)

If you’ve wanted to take an up-close look at one of Tom Fruin’s Kolonihavehus glass mosaic water towers that are dotted around the city, one is on display inside The Shops at Hudson Yards. (Untapped Cities)

ConEd is celebrating turning the power back on in Manhattan with a victory tour of telling the public “sometimes blackouts happen in heatwaves.” Very reassuring. (6sqft)

The federal government will not bring charges for Daniel Pantaleo over the death of Eric Garner. NYPD Commissioner is the arbiter of Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial, which the police administrative judge has not yet rendered a verdict. “The D.O.J. has failed us,” -Mr. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr (NY Times)

The Department of Transportation’s “Safer Cycling” report in 2017 identified eight priority zones with insufficient bike infrastructure and deadly crashes. Since these areas were identified, the number of injuries in the priority zones have risen by 6.5%. (Streetsblog)

The driver of a box truck hit a cyclist in Park Slope on Fifth Avenue. The cyclist was either unconscious or unresponsive before being taken to Methodist hospital. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look into why drivers and pedestrians seem to hate bicyclists. (Gothamist)

CitiBike officially unveiled their plans for expansion into the Bronx Ridgewood, Upper Manhattan, and deeper into Brooklyn. It’ll be a while for some neighborhoods with the expansion scheduled through 2023. (6sqft)

We The Commuters is celebrating Bike Week with a list of biking clubs across the city where the intimidation factor is low and the “we won’t leave you behind” factor is high. (Gothamist)

The play-on-words named Dig Inn has decided to change its name to questionable and no longer punny Dig. They argue “Dig has become more than a restaurant,” to which I argue “restaurants have table service.” (@diginn on Medium)

What to do in a power outage. These are practical tips, this isn’t a guide to entertain yourself. (StreetEasy)

Levain Bakery added a “secret” ice cream sandwich menu item, so if you’re looking to impress your friends who aren’t subscribers to The Briefly, this is your moment. (Gothamist)

A list of the dates where the L train is shut down overnights at ten stations throughout Brooklyn in July, August, September, October, and January. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for six weekends of partial to non-service as switches are replaced. (Curbed)

“My mother at Lincoln Towers at 69th and West End has no power also.” The New York Times published their Slack transcripts from the night of the blackout, because why not? (NY Times)

A farewell to Dean & Deluca. (Grub Street)

Giselle Burgess, the founder of the first troop designed for homeless girls in NYC Girl Scout Troop 6000, was elected to the board of directors of The Child Center of NY. (QNS)

As expected, two real estate trade groups have brought a constitutional challenge against the state’s rent reforms. Historically the Supreme Court has uphelf rent regulations. (NY Times)

Tribeca remains #1 in the city when it comes to home prices, with the median sale price in Q2 of 2019 being $4.34 million. The only neighborhood that comes close is Hudson Yards with $3.86 million. (6sqft)

Williamsburg has the more cases of the measles than any other neighborhood, but the list is 9 neighborhoods long and the total measles count rose by 1 in July to 623. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Tips for eating out in NYC with food allergies. (amNY)

The city’s “Nostalgia Ride” which goes from 96th St to Coney Island along the Q line in a 1917 BMT train will happen this Saturday. Be patient, the ride takes about two hours. (amNY)

Waitress will close on Broadway in January of 2020. (NY Times)

How much trash is on our beaches? Well, Parley for Oceans, the Department of Sanitations official non-profit group, with 170 volunteers picked up 1,200 pounds of trash from Rockaway Beach in two hours. (Gothamist)

The top happy hours in 25 neighborhoods. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 9, 2019 – The “Attack Rats Leaping From Trash Piles” Edition

Vision Zero is “working” with three deaths in two days, the Jeffrey Epstein case, visualizing your awful subway commute, ice cream in Bushwick, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

What do the city’s weed dealers think about Albany’s failure to legalize marijuana? Most of the ones Gothamist spoke to seemed to be behind the idea of legalization, even if it means changing their business. (Gothamist)

Get “disinfected” at The Museum of Booze. (Atlas Obscura)

We’ve got enough problems before we have to start dealing with rats leaping from the trash. (Patch)

Bastille Day is nearing, do you know how to celebrate? (Grub Street)

The Governor signed a bill into law that will allow the release of President Trump’s state tax returns. (NY Times)

A good way to get shot by an NYPD officer is yelling “Die!” while also yelling that you have a gun. (Patch)

A new tool from The New York Times will visualize how unpredictable your subway commute is so you can quantify your misery. (NY Times)

The Guggenheim Museum on the Upper East Side was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of eight Frank Lloyd Wright buildings that received the honor. (Curbed)

8 Frank Lloyd Wright houses in the city, mapped. (Curbed)

What you need to know about Wednesday’s ticker-tape parade for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team. (6sqft)

In a move that is both horrifying and also not surprising, the Department of Health let the Housing Authority appeal inspectors’ discovery of lead in apartments, leaving children exposed to lead in some cases for years. (Curbed)

For the second time in a month, someone set fire to one of the rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in the Bronx. The state’s hate crimes task force is investigating. (amNY)

What would the city look like if sea levels rose 100 feet? Mostly underwater according to this map. (Viewing NYC)

A day in the life of Váyalo Cocina’s Ana Fernandez, who came to the United States from Venezuela on vacation and stayed seeking asylum with her wife and sister. You can find Váyalo Cocina at Smorgasburg in Williamsburg on Saturdays (NY Times)

One week into Mayor de Blasio’s major enforcement action against vehicles blocking and parking in bike lanes. Let’s check in to see how it’s going on Second Ave. (Streetsblog)

In what seems like a test to everyone along the L line, the MTA announced that for 9 weeks of nights and weekends there will be no L train service between Lorimer St and Broadway Junction starting July 16 and ending October 4. (Greenpointers)

There’s a whole neighborhood between DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. 10 things to know about Vinegar Hill. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Inside the drama, comedy, and tragedy of producing theater outdoors across the city. (amNY)

The federal case against Jeffrey Epstein is centered on his Upper East Side Mansion, where prosecutors say he sexually abused dozens of underage girls in a yearslong sex-trafficking conspiracy. (Patch)

Epstein has pleaded not guilty. (Gothamist)

Inside Epstein’s Upper East Side Mansion, which is one of the largest private homes in Manhattan. (NY Times)

The NYPD plans to launch a peer counseling program later this year in an effort to improve cops’ access to mental-health resources after a string of four suicides in June. (Patch)

Take a video tour of MAD Magazine’s offices as the publication will cease printing new material this summer. (Gothamist)

A look inside the lawsuit the Cabán campaign filed, which highlights a lack of trust in the Board of Elections. (QNS)

The mayor still believes that Vision Zero is “working,” despite three people being killed by drivers in the last two days. (Gothamist)

The city is expanding its initiatives designed to encourage green rooftops after no landlord received a tax credit for it in 2018. (amNY)

8 ice cream spots in and around Bushwick. There are that many ice cream spots in and around Bushwick? Bushwick is whatever you want it to be. Maybe there are a million places to get ice cream in Bushwick and you’ve just never seen them all. (Bushwick)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for May 8, 2019 – The “If You Have $27,500 to Spend on Rent” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Vision Zero Design push, the measles spreads to public schools, Bluestockings Bookstore launches a membership program, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A Brooklyn building collapsed after a car slammed into it. Of course, it was caught on video and shared to Twitter. No one was home and the driver tried to flee the scene but was caught by the neighborhood patrol. (Gothamist)

A look at Bjork’s ‘Cornucopia,’ which was previewed at The Shed. (BrooklynVegan)

These “What X,000 rents in NYC right now” posts come pretty regularly, but let’s take a look at what you could get if you have $8,000 a month to spend on rent. (Curbed)

Forget $8,000 a month. How about $27,500 a month for this West Village townhouse? (6sqft)

This is the smallest theater in NYC. Take a peek. (Untapped Cities)

Inside The Costume Institute’s CAMP exhibit at The Met. (Gothamist)

Believe it or not, there are neighborhoods where home prices are dropping. It might not be by much, but take what you can get. (Patch)

A Florida Man story ends on the L Train. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you only need a photo. Like this one of Lawrence Fishburne looking cool as hell on a street corner in 1989. (Viewing NYC)

Corey Johnson is going to push forward the Vision Design bill this month, putting him at odds with the mayor. The bill would force the DOT to develop a checklist of street design elements that enhance safety. For each eligible street, the DOT would be required to state which elements were applied, or why not if it wasn’t. Accountability isn’t the city government’s strong suit. (Streetsblog)

Johnson’s not short on presenting big ideas, it’s been two months since his “the city should take over the MTA” plan, which has been largely ignored and not discussed at all by all prominent players involved in state and city government. (Second Ave Sagas)

Amazon is building in Queens, but it’s a $5.6 factory with no high-paying tech jobs. (6sqft)

Amazon’s also coming to Manhattan, but with an Amazon Go store in the Brookfield Mall in downtown Manhattan. (Tribeca Citizen)

Six female corrections officers were arrested and arraigned in New York State Supreme Court following allegations they performed illegal strip searches on women attempting to visit their loved ones in a Manhattan jail. (The Root)

The ultimate guide to the High Line, from the basics to the history to the future. (Curbed)

Explore the city’s worst evictor landlords with the Right to Counsel NYC Coalition, JustFix.nyc, and the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project’s new website and interactive map. (Gothamist)

The Grub Street guide to Mother’s Day. (Grub Street)

Forget DC, Albany could allow Congress to see the president’s federal tax returns. (NY Times)

A guide for tipping in NYC. Send this to anyone visiting so you don’t have to answer their questions. (TripSavvy)

Sharpen your skills with the “Knife Lady of Chelsea Market.” (ABC 7)

Because the city will never be free from the grip of special elections, here are the eight candidates vying for Jumane Williams’s seat on the city council. (amNY)

It’s the seventh edition of NYCxDesign, here’s what to see. (NY Times)

The measles outbreak has grown to 466 cases, expanding into the city’s public schools. The infected students had religious exemptions from the vaccine. The city has given 84 summonses for failing to comply with the vaccine mandate. (amNY)

A photo of a fatberg in a water treatment plant should be enough of a reminder to stop flushing your “flushable” wipes. (StreetEasy)

Bluestockings Bookstore, the radical bookstore, fair trade cafe, and activist center in the Lower East Side, is starting a membership program on the event of their twentieth anniversary to stay a radical outpost in a capitalist world. (Bedford + Bowery)

The best seafood restaurants and dishes in the city. (Thrillist)

10,000 Uber drivers in the city plan to strike on Wednesday morning in solidarity with worldwide drivers’ protest of Ubers SEC filing. (amNY)

The first trans-Atlantic flight was 100 years ago today, originating from Fort Tilden in Queens. It was eight years before Charles Lindburg’s nonstop solo flight. It was six Navy and Coast Guard crewmen and it took three weeks in their NC-4 seaplane. (NY Times)

This week’s featured walk from GoRoam: Scenic Chelsea and Greenwich Village (GoRoam)