The Briefly for February 6, 2019 – The “Do You Smell Maple Syrup or an Oil Spill?” Edition

Historians plan to block the Brooklyn Promenade construction, the NYCHA gets a new leader, an atomic Super Bowl meltdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Get a feel for the city’s housing crisis with an interactive map of 20,000 evictions in 2018. (Curbed)

How to watch tonight’s ten person Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

Has it already been ten years since the mysterious maple syrup smell took over the city. Was it Northrax? Nope. It was a a perfume and food additive processing plant. (Gothamist)

The MTA is having a banner week. Maybe they’re celebrating the anniversary? A noxious gas filled the L train tunnel between Manhattan and Brooklyn on Tuesday as a result of an oil leak. (Brooklyn Paper)

Know your pain before you arrive. JFK, Newark, and LaGuardia’s websites now show real-time information on the wait times for taxis and TSA checkpoints. (Curbed)

The mayor expanded dual-language pre-K programs, which will now include French, Haitian Creole, Japanese, and Hebrew in addition to Spanish, Chinese, Russian, and Bengali, which are already available. The expansion has a dual purpose of also giving the mayor more control over the city’s schools. (Chalkbeat)

Why city parking is so annoying and how to master it. (Thrillist)

Historic preservation groups may sue the city if the city’s BQE plans move forward that removes the Brooklyn Promenade. (Curbed)

Apple may open a new office at Hudson Yards. Another tech company making a home in NYC without negotiating subsidies. (6sqft)

Why are condos more expensive than co-ops? (StreetEasy)

If you hate large sandwiches, this tiny egg sandwich is for you. (Eater)

Five mothers filed complaint against the NYPD after they say they were forced to pump breast milk in front of their colleagues, a violation of a 2007 law. (NY Post)

The 9 most romantic spots in NYC and also the Staten Island Ferry. (6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is claiming the state senate is playing politics with the Amazon HQ2 deal by appointing Senator Michael Gianaris to the Public Authorities Control Board. The governor has to approve Gianaris’ appointment to the board. Will he? “Well we’re not there yet.” (Gothamist)

State Senator Michael Gianaris gets the NY Times profile treatment. (NY Times)

Trump Tower: Luxury living for the morally bankrupt. (EV Grieve)

The FDNY saved 46 puppies and two cats from a burning pet store on the Upper East Side. No puppies were injured. (NY Post)

It’s a bad week for Broadway shows. “Anastasia” will lose on March 31. (NY Times)

NYC Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia will serve as interim head of NYCHA, Garcia is the head of the Department of Sanitation and also the city’s lead czar. (Pix 11)

MoMA will close for four months to re-envision how the collection is presented, from June 15 to October 21. (Patch)

The East Village’s Atomic Wings had a super atomic meltdown during the Super Bowl. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 24, 2019 – The “L Train Shutdown Alternative Plans are Here” Edition

The MTA board member challenge, the housing violation and asthma connection, LaGuardia Lake, electric scooters may become viable, Alec Baldwin plead guilty, and more in today’s daily NYC news update.

The Supreme Court is reviewing the city’s gun law that limits residents from transporting their guns from their homes. (NY Times)

Your horror of a Wednesday morning commute was brought to you by a water main break that flooded the tracks in Chelsea and someone on the tracks at Bryant Park. (NY Post)

The MTA Board Member Challenge: Can you name a single member of the MTA’s board? (NY Times)

Here are the possible details of the L Train Unshutdown (editor’s note: we need a better name for this), according to a leaked memo. It’s not pretty. (Streetsblog)

Say hello to the Peanut Butter Dream Waffle, the Leslie Knope-worthy Frankenstein’s Monster from Clinton Hall. Nutella, peanut butter cups, waffles, and peanut butter pie all for $25. (Brokelyn)

LaGuardia Airport was once likened to “some third world country” by America’s uncle Joe Biden. It didn’t help when a sprinkler head burst in Terminal B, creating an indoor lake for travelers to walk through. (Gothamist)

Photos from inside Ellis Island’s abandoned hospital complex. Spoiler alert: It’s creepy. (Untapped Cities)

7 dinner suggestions for Valentine’s Day under $75. (amNY)

Alec Baldwin pleaded guilty to third-degree attempted assault and second-degree harassment when he punched someone over a parking spot. He’ll complete a short anger management class and pay a $120 fine. (amNY)

Housing violations and high asthma rates have a connection, according to a new analysis. (Curbed)

Do New Yorkers prefer Cuomo or Gillibrand for president in 2020? Trick question. We prefer Bloomberg. (Politico)

The DOT has an open call for artists that end on February 15. (DOT)

Watch the construction of the TWA Hotel in the only way to watch construction: time-lapse. (6sqft)

Demolition permits for 80 Flatbush Ave and Katie Merz’ mural (highlighted in The Briefly last week) have been filed. The project is set to complete in 2025. (Bklyner)

Two of the students in the Poly Prep High School blackface video have transferred. Everyone involved, including the parents, have awful excuses for the video. (Gothamist)

The story of Transmitter Park, from the hunting grounds of Native Americans, to WNYC’s A.M. transmitter site, to public park. (Greenpointers)

The three cities in “The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” “High Maintenance,” and “Broad City” still make one New York. (NY Times)

Here are the details on a supposed “secret” subway and bus fare hike alternate plan. It’s a secret and the New York Times and Gothamist have written about it? (Gothamist)

America’s most expensive home is on Central Park South. A 24,000 square foot apartment on Central Park South sold for $238 million and will serve as a second home for a Chicago billionaire. (Curbed)

From the “Everyone you know on Facebook probably already shared this story” file: Chick-Fil-A is reportedly taking over the Old Blue Water Grill space in Union Square when it closes after more than 20 years. (Gothamist)

The Dream Act was passed by the state’s legislature and will provide financial aid to the 146,000 undocumented minors in New York state. The DREAM Fund will be funded by private contributions and will not be funded by the state. (NY Times)

Has the F train randomly turning express F’ed your commute lately? City Councilmember Brad Lander is created an F train express incident form with a hope of shining a light on the issue. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Is the city ready to allow electric scooters on our streets? (Mashable)

Commissioner James O’Neill says the NYPD is turning to apps, basketball leagues, and virtual reality to help reduce violent crime in six targeted neighborhoods. (NY Post) Watch the full State of the NYPD speech. (CBS News)

Meet Goliath, the hero boxer and very good boy, who saved his human’s life while their home in East New York caught fire. The fire destroyed three homes and aside from a broken arm, everyone is safe. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

RIP Jimmy “Blanco” Becker, Orchard St’s “man in white.” (Bowery Boogie)

Throw an ax, take a dip, play laser tag, and other indoor activities to help beat back the winter blues. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for January 15, 2019 – The “8% Rate of Success” Edition

Early voting passes the state legislature, Governor Cuomo thinks the city should foot half the bill for the subway, the best winter brunches, the Amazon-Chrysler building, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

10 short interviews about congestion pricing with state legislators. (Streetsblog)

The annual No Pants Subway Ride happened. There are photos. (Gothamist)

Voting reform passed the state legislature, which adds 10 days of early voting, consolidates state and federal primary dates, and pre-registers 17 and 17-year-olds when they sign up for a driving permit. A constitutional amendment was proposed that will allow same-day voter registration and allow anyone to vote absentee without an excuse.(CBS New York)

Signal problems caused delays during 92% of weekdays in 2018. Since the city enacted the Subway Action Plan, delays have increased. (Daily News)

The state is doubling the amount of speed cameras in the city’s school zones as part of Governor Cuomo’s state budget, increasing from 149 to 290, which matches the number of cameras the state’s legislature was trying to pass last year. (Streetsblog)

The best winter brunch spots. (Thrillist)

This is why we can’t have nice things. The city is suing Metropolitan Property Group for running an illegal Airbnb network in 130 apartments, which housing more than 75,000 guests from 2015 to 2018. (The Real Deal)

Okay, so “Amazon” is the new default answer for any question, but who will be the Chrysler Building’s new tenant? Yup, Amazon. (6sqft)

Here’s what to know about the city’s new, updated and existing ferry routes. (amNY)

Meet Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the the Metropolitan Opera new openly gay conductor. (NY Times)

Say farewell to Westsider Books on Broadway in the Upper West Side. Not every closing bookstore has a Lin-Manuel Miranda. (West Side Rag)

“Being from Staten Island gives you that ability to brush it off.” Being from Staten Island made the cast of MTV’s “Made in Staten Island” immune to criticism that they are tarnishing the pristine public image of Staten Island. (amNY)

The secret economy of diabetes test strips. (NY Times)

Everyone wants to be the one that fixes the subways, but no one wants to pay for it. (NY Post)

Do you have what it takes to drink this $375, 20 pound spiked hot chocolate? (Time Out)

Five things to look for in today’s state budget address today (Tuesday). (amNY)

The Port Authority removed the Saudi Arabia part of the “Candy Nations” art installation due to its proximity to the World Trade Center due to complains that point out the Saudi connection to the 9/11 attacks. (NY Post)

JFK and Laguardia airports have been providing food to TSA and Federal Aviation Administration workers while they aren’t paid during President Trump’s government shutdown. (Airport Voice)

The government shutdown means no family visiting at Metropolitan Correctional Center, the high-security federal jail in Manhattan that houses terrorists, white-collar criminals, and El Chapo. Prisoners are on a hunger strike after the second week of canceled visits due to staffing shortages. (NY Times)

Turns out a plan similar to governor Cuomo’s new L train non-shutdown was considered and rejected five years ago because of serious safety concerns. (NY Times)

He can decide the L train shutdown isn’t happening and declare emergency meetings of the MTA board, but Governor Cuomo still claims that he’s not in charge of the MTA. (Second Ave. Sagas)

The person handpicked by Mayor de Blasio to head up his BQX streetcar project left the United States for a new job in Saudi Arabia. (Politico)

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