The Briefly for July 22, 2020 – The “$400 Million Extra in Overtime” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A guide to Governors Island, the state’s legislature sets an agenda for its summer session, where to heat outside in the East Village, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 88˚
Possible rain in the evening.

What to expect when you’re expecting the state legislature’s summer session to start soon. In focus will be nursing homes, automatic voter registration, redistricting, contract tracing privacy, and more. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

Following the June 23 primary and election, State Assemblymember Jeffrey Dinowitz is pushing legislation that would extend the state’s relaxed absentee voting rules until January 2022, which is the earliest the state’s constitution could be amended. (Norwood News)

What’s open, what’s closed, what to eat, and what to wear (a mask). A guide to Government Island. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A Queens man claimed NYPD officers beat him, twice Tased him, and yanked out one of his dreadlocks, according to a federal police brutality lawsuit. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD pledged to cut overtime by $335 million in an attempt to cut its budget by $1 billion. Instead, they are predicted to overspend on overtime by $400 million by the Independent Budget Office. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Our absentee voting mess is giving the White House ammo against main-in voting. Great. (Daniel Marans for HuffPost)

12 ways to picnic in Tompkins Square Park. (Rob Patronite for Grub Street)

New York Attorney General Letitia James along with 23 other Democratic attorney generals are suing the Trump administration to stop a new rule that removes non-discrimination protections against LGBTQ people when it comes to health care and health insurance, which is set to take effect in mid-August. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for QNS)

The latest Black Lives Matter / Blue Lives Matter protest clash happened in Marine Park in Brooklyn, but this time there were words exchanged without violence. (amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The new take-out only Smorgasburg. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A woman was found floating in the East River on Monday night with no signs of trauma on her body. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Jonathan Rodriguez was the second person arrested in connection with the death of Richard Hamlet, whose body was discovered wrapped in plastic atop a Bronx McDonald’s last week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If it didn’t fully set in the other day, the F train will be shutting down on nights and weekends for eight months starting in August. Ruining subway reliability? Now THAT is how we start feeling normal again. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Is it possible that the Mets’ deal with Jed Lowrie is the worst in the franchise’s history? The Mets started paying him $20 million a year last year, he’s made eight plate appearances, was injured for the rest of the season and is already on the injured list. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

In an attempt to “resolve problems outside the court system,” Mayor de Blasio announced a mediation project for the city to work with landlords and tenants. Renters will receive legal assistance and advice to negotiate with landlords. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

After 21 years, radical bookstore, cafe, and activist center Bluestockings is looking for a new home. The bookstore is being pushed from the location by their landlord’s demands for higher rent. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Interview: Storm King Art Center’s Director of Facilities Mike Seaman on what it takes to maintain Storm King year round, keeping it a beautiful place that everyone is already tired of seeing your photos of on Instagram. (Luna Shyr for Atlas Obscura)

The closing Fairway grocery stores in Red Hook and Douglaston, Queens will become Food Bazaar stores. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Rooftop Films is back to create a summer movie drive-in theater in Flushing Meadows Park. It started on Friday night with John Lewis: Good Trouble, which was a few hours before the news of Lewis’s beath became public. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

Interview: Melba’s restaurant’s Melba Wilson on the future of NYC restaurants. (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

M.I.A. and Brik Bar in Astoria and Maspeth Pizza House in Maspeth have all had their liquor licenses revoked. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden will reopen on August 7. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Meet Street Riders NYC, the mobile protest movement with over 60,000 among its ranks. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Wear your damn mask on the subway. That’s the message of the MTA’s Mask Force, an arm of “Operation Respect.” (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Upper East Side for Black Lives Matter has held 50 consecutive nights of vigils in Charles Schurz Park. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Black Tap is selling its Instagram-ready milkshakes to-go for the first time. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

I don’t know a single person who would say that the COVID-19 pandemic has been easy to get through, but as a disabled New Yorker, it came with extra challenges and stressors. Politicians talked about the importance of protecting the elderly but failed to mention disabled people as if we didn’t exist. Do you know what it’s like to be erased during a pandemic?
-Michele Kaplan, disability rights advocate, Disability and dignity in the age of COVID-19 for amNewyork Metro

From Tuesday to Saturday from 12-4 pm and 5-9 pm at Lincoln Center until August 1, Lincoln Center will be playing music in the Josie Robertson Plaza, the initiative is being called Sounds of Lincoln Center. (Mike Mishkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

Riders are up on the city’s buses, but speeds are down. New York City is healing herself. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Someone is using Republican Assemblymember and congressional candidate Nicole Malliotakis’s name to talk shit about the mayor and governor on flyers in Bay Ridge. Malliotakis says someone is trying to defame her by putting up the flyers. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Councilmember Donovan Richards won the Queens borough president primary and will go on to the general election in November to likely become the first Black man elected to the office. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

Interview: Joycelyn Taylor, candidate for NYC mayor is 2021.(Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Photos: As the summer heat cooks the city, the city is no longer just living through the pandemic, we’re living with it. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Where to eat outside in the East Village. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from a recent Bowery walk!

The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for Valentine’s Day, 2020 – The “Your Plant Stylist Appointment is Coming Up” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 12 places to smooch your Valentine, Bloomberg tries to distract from his record with memes, the 27 top burgers, Trump vs NY rolls on, and more

Today – Low: 18˚ High: 34˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 30˚ High: 47˚

12 places to smooch on Valentine’s Day. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

There have been no cases of coronavirus in New York City and despite this, the city’s Chinatowns are suffering. (Marina Fang for Huff Post)

A look forward on this frigid morning to the spring’s street festivals on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

For $2,000 someone will come to your home and style your plants. Welcome to the world of plant stylists. (Steven Kurutz for NY Times)

About half the adult population of the city, roughly 3.4 million people, spent one of the last few years living below the poverty line, according to a new report from the Robin Hood Foundation and Columbia University. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Ready for a cocktail crawl? Here’s how to get it done on Atlantic Avenue. (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Michael Bloomberg’s forceful push into meme culture is being lead by Mick Purzycki, who is the CEO of Jerry Media, famous for stealing content without crediting the original creators. Can the people who brought you the marketing for the Fyre Festival distract us enough from the negative headlines and quotes from Bloomberg’s past? (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Roses are red, Violets are blue, Unlike the F train, I'll be there for you

The mayor signed a bill this week that will extend government-funded health care to families of all municipal workers, not just firefighters and police, who died in the line of duty or from 9/11 related diseases. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The annual tradition continues: Phil Collins Day is on Saturday. (Kate Hooker for Brooklyn Based)

The moment the state announced the end of brokers’ fees, rents jumped up about 6% across the board. Now that the fees are gone, it’s unlikely we’ll see a 6% drop back down. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City Comptroller Scott String is calling for a Bill of Rights for NYC tenants to protect them from unscrupulous landlords. He has a proposal as well, including limiting security deposits to one month of rent, providing itemized statements of damage, a five-day gras period for late rent, requiring a court order for evictions, and much more. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

GZA played ‘Liquid Swords’ at the Blue Note Jazz Club in honor of the album’s 25th anniversary. (BrooklynVegan)

The top five potato dishes in the city, according to Robert Sietsema. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The governor is making a new push for legalizing compensated gestational surrogacy with a campaign called “Love Makes A Family.” New York is one of three states that hasn’t legalized the practice. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Real Estate Porn: Don Lemon is selling his Harlem condo. You can live like Don Lemon for only $1.75 million. The condo looks like a great place to get drunk on New Year’s Eve and make mistakes. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The story of a meander and 14 photos of central Park Slope. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

48 pictures of the beautiful Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Manhattan, we have to have a serious conversation. We know you’re not going to Brooklyn on the weekends, even if you need groceries and Brooklyn has the only Wegmans in the city. You want to veg out, binge the new season of Narcos and order some Seamless. That’s cool, because now Wegmans delivers to Manhattan. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

In a literal quid pro quo, the president said if New York stops suing the president, the president will restore New Yorkers’ access to Trusted Traveler Programs programs. This ban happened the day he was acquitted after being impeached. Letitia James has filed 35 lawsuits against the federal government since January 2019. (Xeni Jardin for BoingBoing)

A look into the illegal, but welcome, underground of street car washers. (Sandra E. Garcia and Stephen Speranza for NY Times)

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza came to a tentative agreement on a contract that gives increased pay and paid parental leave to principals and assistant principals. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Got furniture you want to get rid of but it’s too nice for the curb (note: nothing is too nice for @stoopingnyc)? Here’s where to sell used, vintage, and antique furniture in the city. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Bronx City Council Member Vanessa Gibson is going to pay $5,000 for abusing her position on City Council to get out of paying a $50 ticket for driving while using her phone. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A developer in Crown Heights was ordered to remove all construction equipment from the potential site of two 16-story towers after they were discovered violating a temporary restraining order. Activists have targeted the buildings as part of an anti-gentrification campaign lead by Movement to Protect the People. The group claimed the buildings would block sunlight for the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, but this has been refuted by the BBG and should not be confused with the 39-story tower that the BBG is actively campaigning against in its “Fight for Sunlight” campaign. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

27 top burgers in the city. (Eater)

Thank you to my valentine Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo.