The Briefly for February 19-20, 2021 – The “Cuomo Versus the World” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Pearl River Mart has a new home, where to go sledding, the greatest fictional NYC mayor, Amazon gets sued, Block-owned coffee shops, and more

Today – Low: 25˚ High: 34˚
Snow (1–2 in.) in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 22˚ High: 34˚

• Ask An Epidemiologist: Should you wear two masks? Dr. David Chokshi, the city’s health commissioner and guy in all those commercials on Hulu, says two are better than one. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Farewell to Park Slope’s Mission Delores, a fantastic bar. (Jason Diamond for Grub Street)

17 spots to go sledding in New York City. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A timeline of Governor Cuomo’s nursing home controversy. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

• Not everyone is fighting Governor Cuomo. Cuomo took $145 million from the MTA’s budget and they aren’t challenging it. Of the $145 million, $107 million is being taken from an operating fund that is supposed to be dedicated to fund mass transit. Cuomo has not stated the reason for removing the money from the MTA’s budget. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

• The Department of Justice and FBI are investigating Governor Cuomo’s administration over the nursing home issue. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

• Assemblyman Ron Kim has been criticizing Governor Cuomo for months about how Cuomo handled the state’s nursing homes. When Kim said Cuomo was “trying to dodge any incriminating evidence,” it resulted in the governor calling up Kim to let him know Cuomo would “destroy” him. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

• Answering the question of who is Ron Kim? (Christine Chung for The City)

Pearl River Mart has found itself a new home at 452 Broadway, near Canal St. (Bowery Boogie)

• Gothamist held a vote for the greatest fictional mayor of New York City, using ranked choice voting, and the results are in! Mayor Lenny from Ghostbusters is the city’s greatest fictional mayor, who also has one of my favorite quotes in history about NYC: “Being miserable and treating other people like dirt is every New Yorker’s God-given right.” (Jake Dobkin and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

• Photos: 16 stunning photos of NYC landmarks blanketed in snow. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

• Where does Greenwich Village end? What are the boundaries of Bed-Stuy? How far So of Ho does SoHo extend? The fight over perceived neighborhood borders is heating up again. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

• Interview: Did you watch us land on Mars on Thursday? Meet Vishnu Sridhar, a Queens boy who is the lead systems engineer for the SuperCam on the Mars 2020 rover. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A look into keeping pigeons, a dwindling hobby in NYC. (Allie Conti for NY Times)

Coney Island will be able to reopen on April 9 at a 33% capacity, but if you want to get in, you must buy tickets in advance and wear face coverings, and the parks must conduct temperature checks and clean the rides frequently. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The city has new guidance for indoor dining, which includes limiting parties to 4 or fewer, wearing a mask whenever you are not actively eating or drinking, and more. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

“I’ve had to cancel counseling sessions to stand by metal detectors that children are required to go through, to monitor the hallways, or to “watch” a group of suspended students. I could fill pages with all the jobs I’ve done that have nothing to do with social work. The rationalization is that any type of human interaction automatically translates into “social work.” That’s because most people have no idea what a social worker does.”
– Vanessa Vélez, Nobody knows what a social worker does. That is hurting our students., for Chalkbeat

• Maps: How Covid-19 impacted internet speeds across the city. (Jameson Zimmer for Untapped New York)

Mount Sinai Health System has been canceling thousands of first dose vaccine appointments in the last few days due to low supply. (Caroline Lewis and Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

• Sections of Queens, Hunts Point in the Bronx, and East New York and Brownsville in Brooklyn had among the lowest percent of residents who have received at least one dose of a Cocid-19 vaccine. (Sydney Pereira and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

• Maps: Vaccine data by zip code. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

• The case against Amy Cooper, the woman who falsely called the police on a Black man in Central Park for “threatening” her, was dropped on Tuesday after she completed a therapeutic program that included instruction about racial biases. (Jonah E. Bromwich for NY Times)

How New York City’s delivery workers survive snowstorms. (Jasmine Fernandez for NY City Lens)

• Amazon tried to block it with a lawsuit of their own, but Attorney General Letitia James is suing Amazon over the company’s failure to provide safety measures for its NYC workers during the pandemic. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

• Barstool Sports is 100% garbage and founder Dave Portnoy is a piece of human shit. I hold these opinions for reasons outside of Portnoy calling New Haven the pizza capital of the world. The Coney Island Blog makes the (correct) argument that the best pizza int he world is made in Brooklyn. (The Coney Island Blog)

• Check out BKFoxx’s new mural for the Year of the Ox in Chinatown at Dr. Sun Yat Middle School on Eldridge and Hester. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

• The State Liquor Authority has begun to crack down on obvious violations of the rules of outdoor dining, suspending the liquor licenses of nine restaurants and bars. Most suspensions appear to be as a result of fully enclosed outdoor dining structures. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

• Real Estate Lust: A $2.3 million Brownstone in Brooklyn Heights with two outdoor spaces and three fireplaces. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Governor Cuomo has gone back to the drawing board on his marijuana legalization bill after being widely criticized for his last attempt over not doing enough to address communities hit hardest by the war on drugs and still criminalized offenses in ways that would disproportionally impact people of color. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Where to find a work from home snack break in the East Village. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

• New York region’s subway system is the worst for air pollution in the Northeast. We’re #1! We’re #1! We’re #1! Suck it, Boston and DC, you can’t keep up with our air pollution in the subways. Maybe after reading this I’ll keep wearing a mask on the subway forever. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Overanalyzing Andrew Yang’s Instagram meals because sometimes we need a break from criticizing the stream of dumb things this guy keeps saying in public. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

28 Black-owned coffee shops in NYC. (Hannah Albertine and Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for February 5-6, 2021 – The “New York is Dead. Don’t Come Back.” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Pity the millionaires on Park Ave, mayoral candidates back away from defund the police, searching for the perfect mozzarella stick, & more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 21˚ High: 37˚

• Battery-powered sweatshirts, blanket rentals, navigating a meal in the dark, and the highs and lows of eating outside in sub-freezing temperature. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

• Nothing is as New York as putting up billboards in Los Angeles and Miami saying “New York is Dead. Don’t Come Back.” Kudos to The Locker Room, a female-owned Brooklyn-based creative house, for the idea. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Restaurant workers are now eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine. It took less than a day after announcing indoor dining’s that Governor Cuomo realized that sending people indoors to interact with a staff that is unvaccinated is the idea of an idiot. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Eastern Queens is a vaccine desert. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

Yankee Stadium opens as a vaccination spot today with appointments available for Bronx residents. There are appointments available. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

• The MTA opened a new entrance to the Nostrand A/C station on Thursday. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

• It’s pretty common advice in the city to avoid looking like a tourist by not looking up as you walk, that likely makes the Walk of Fame at Theater 80 on St. Marks one of the city’s most well-seen landmarks. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

12 new public art installations in February at Times Square, Rockefeller Center, the Port Authority and more. (Michelle Young Untapped New York)

• Real Estate Lust: A $2.65 million Crown Heights townhouse with a massive backyard and beautiful an en-suite bathroom with separate tub and shower. Sometimes a listing is just nice to look at because you’ve been inside your apartment for nearly a year and it’s just nice to think about being somewhere else for a moment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

• No one should be surprised at a headline that reads “Rockaway ‘pizza nazi’ charged with harassing ex-girlfriend.” (David Brand for Queens Post)

The search for the impossibly perfect mozzarella stick with Big Stick Willy’s in the East Village. (Megan Pzetzhold for Grub Street)

• The discriminatory loitering law known as a ban on “walking while trans” has been repealed by the state’s legislature. State Senator Brad Hoylman of Manhattan and Assemmblymember Amy Paulin of Westchester were the bill’s lead sponsors. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The Harriet and Thomas Truesdell House at 227 Duffield Street was designated an individual landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, ending a sixteen year-long fight to preserve the structure which is to believed had once been a stop on the Underground Railroad. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Ranked Choice Voting was unnecessary for the city’s first election utilizing it. Congrats to Democrat James Gennaro on winning the Queens City Council District 24 election. (Christine Chung for The City)

Meet the self-appointed and self-proclaimed Nut-Butter Don of Flatbush. (Emma Orlow for Grub Street)

• Remember the nets installed under the 7 train to prevent debris from falling onto pedestrians and vehicles? Well now they’re full of snow and are being described as “vast, pendulous sacks.” Apparently the MTA didn’t think about what happens when it snows when installing them. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

• The Hess spite triangle, my favorite spot in NYC, is for sale with the Village Cigars Building on the corner of Seventh Ave South and Christopher Street for $5.5 million. (Sophia Chang and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)`

• Pity the inhabitants of 432 Park, one of the wealthiest addresses and once the tallest residential buildings in the world, who complain about leaks, a creaky building, and elevator malfunctions. One prerequisite for living in the building is spending $15,000 a year at its private restaurant, overseen bu a Michelin-star chef. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

• Chicago pizza, Philly cheesesteaks, Nashville hot chicken, Detroit pizza, and now St. Louis wings? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

• Staten Island’s Republican Representative Nicole Malliotakis voted against certifying the 2020 election results, held a “Get Well Soon” rally for former President Trump, and one of her campaign operatives and longtime friend posted a video saying “Heil Hitler” on Facebook. Now Malliotakis has a new opponent. The Nicole is Complicit PAC raised $20,000 within four hours of launching its website to ensure that Malliotakis is a one term member of Congress. (Jazmine Hughes for NY Times)

The filming locations for Netflix’s Unorthodox. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

• Patch wants to find NYC’s worst slush puddle. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden has launched a series of guided audio walks and installations, offering in-depth visits that remain socially distanced. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

• Photos: Swoon’s sculpture and mobile performance stage The House Our Families Built, now at Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

• Two men being held on Rikers Island filed a lawsuit in that the state’s rules allowing immunizations for residents of other congregate settings like nursing homes, shelters and long-term care facilities while excluding incarcerated people is “arbitrary and capricious.” The lawsuit argues that all people in prisons and jails should be given access to vaccines. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• City Councilman Carlos Menchaca is seeking to remove Former President Trump’s name from city properties citing a Department of Buildings statute that regulates signs effect on “quality of life in a particular neighborhood.” (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

3 Super Bowl specials to order, even if you don’t watch the game. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

New York has been declared the best city in the country for pizza addicts. It isn’t an addiction, it’s a deep and undying appreciation! (Anna ben Yehuda for Time Out)

• Mayor de Blasio appointed a new head of the Department of Transportation and he’s a political ally with no experience in transportation. Commissioner Gutman, who now runs the $1.3 billion department, promised the installation of 10,000 bike parking racks. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

21 restaurants offering Valentine’s Day specials. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

• The New York Botanical Garden announced new dates for Yayoi Kusama’s KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature exhibition, Saturday, April 10 to Sunday, October 31, 2021. (6sqft)

What you need to know about the District Attorney races in 2021. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Andrew Yang tested positive for Covid-19. He’s been the candidate for mayor who has held the most in-person events and already had to quarantine once due to a staffer testing positive. (Katie Glueck for NY Times)

• Following up with the mayoral candidates that supported calls to Defund the Police when it was the politically expedient thing to say. Unsurprisingly, as candidates, everyone’s tone has changed. (Jeffery C. Mays and Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

• Mayoral candidates Shaun Donovan, Kathryn Garcia, Andrew Yang, Carlos Menchaca, Maya Wiley, and Ray McGuire support requiring NYPD officers to live in NYC. More than half of the NYPD’s uniformed officers currently live outside the city. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• Interview: Isaac Wright Jr. discusses his run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

A running list of new restaurants that opened in February. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Thanks to reader Amanda Hatfield for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 26, 2020 – The “Welcome to Manhattan, $20 Please” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The CBGB Caucus, phase three could start on July 6, vendors return to Rockaway Beach, Harlem gets a Black Lives Matter street mural, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 74˚ High: 86˚

2020 is the year that everyone wants to start selling nutcrackers. (Margot Boyer-Dry for NY Times)

Without federal assistance, the MTA is leaving nothing in the table when it comes to attempting to make up for a combined $15 billion of lost revenue over two years. Already discussed are the disastrous combinations of non‐personnel expense reductions, reductions in force, fare and toll increases, service reductions, and “long‐term deficit financing.” (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

With the MTA’s trouble at the front of mind, let’s not forget that the city is waiting on federal approval for congestion pricing to enter Manhattan. A Cornell University study found that a $20 toll could reduce Manhattan’s traffic by 40%, greenhouse gas emission could be cut by 15%, and ridership on mass transit would increase by 6%. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA will rename two Brooklyn subway stops to include the name of Medgar Evers College, thanks to legislation from Assembly Member Diana Richardson and State Senator Zellnor Myrie. The new stops will be named Franklin Avenue-Medgar Evers College and President Street-Medgar Evers College. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

One of the hardest-hit industries during the pandemic is dog walkers. As life slowly edges towards normal and dog adoptions have spiked, can dog walker rebound? (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

City Councilmember Ritchie Torres has a sizable lead in the 15th Congressional District in the South Bronx. If that lead persists through the counting of absentee ballots, he could be the first out gay Afro-Latinx member of Congress. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The NYPD promoted three people of color to chief positions. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

David Afanador, the cop who allegedly put a man in an illegal chokehold in Queens days after it became illegal across the state, turned himself in and was charged with attempted aggravated strangulation and strangulation in the second degree. If convicted, he could face seven years in prison. (NY1)

Identifying 10 streets that would be ideal to close for outdoor dining. (Eater)

22 branches of the NYPL, QPL, and BPL will be opening on July 13 for grab-and-go service. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Grub Street floats an interesting idea: Should this be the end of the traditional menu? Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

We’re five days into phase two, which means the city is turning its eyes towards phase three, which includes basketball courts, dog runs, indoor restaurant service, nail salons, massage therapists, and other personal care services. The city is on pace to hit phase three on July 6. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

City Councilmembers Justin Brannan and Keith Powers have formed the “CBGB Caucus” as a way to help support independent music venues that remain closed and will remain closed through phase three, across the city. In a letter to the city’s Congressional Delegation, they outline support for a benefit for venues that have been completely unable to open due to the pandemic and emergency unemployment benefits for their workers. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The New-York Historical Society will, with approval from the city, be opening on August 14 with an outdoor exhibition called “Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine“. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

As stores slowly reopen, there’s a movement to preserve the protest art that adorned storefronts around SoHo. (NY1)

It’s less than reassuring to know that in the week of a primary, the NYC Board of Elections Director was fined for violating the city’s ethics law. The center of the violation is a hotel stay in 2018 that was paid for by Election Systems & Software while he was serving on their board, a company that the city purchases election machines and supplies from. He resigned from his position with ES&S later in 2018. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The local election to watch this fall will be Trump-supporting Republican challenger Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis trying to unseat Democratic incumbent Rep. Max Rose. Only a few days out from the primaries and both are on the attack. Rose called Malliotakis “a fraud who represents everything we hate about our politics.” (Rose Adams for amNewyork Metro)

Farewell to the Way Station, the Doctor Who-themed bar in Prospect Heights, who will not be regenerating after the pandemic. (Serena Dai for Eater)

10 chefs and restauranteurs discuss how they feel about reopening. (The Infatuation)

The New York City Council voted Thursday to legalize e-bikes and e-scooters for use on city streets, forcing the mayor to confront a reversal of his ill-conceived and poorly-executed crackdown of electric bikes. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Take a walk around the Rink at Rockefeller Center and it will become impossible to not see the 100 Pride flags flying around the plaza as a part of Rockefeller Center’s celebration of World Pride Day. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

If you can’t get out and do a socially-distant tour of LGBTQ+ landmarks across the city the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project and CyArk created a 3D virtual tour. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A look at Attorney General William Barr’s attempt to undermine New York’s federal prosecutors. (Benjamin Weiser, Ben Protess, Katie Benner and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

New York is releasing $65 million in federal money to help preschools and daycare centers reopen after the coronavirus forced many to close down. The preschools and daycares say it isn’t enough. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Harlem will be getting a Black Lives Matter street mural on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard between 125th and 127th Streets. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A look at the positive impact the city’s use of hotel rooms as homeless shelters can have. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

It won’t be happening this weekend, but along with lifeguards, food vendors are coming back to Rockaway Beach on July 1. (Alexander Jusdanis for Bedford + Bowery)

28 NYC restaurants with new outdoor dining. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chris for today’s photo of the new VBallentine mural in Crown Heights.