The Briefly for April 13, 2020 – The “Cutting Your Hair Yourself at Home” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Inside the latest fight between de Blasio and Cuomo, a clarification on the mass burials on Hart Island, caterers go delivery, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 65˚
Rain and dangerously windy until evening.

Photos: NYC landmarks lit up blue in support of frontline COVID-19 workersª. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A look at what happens to NYC rents during a recession. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Absolutely have to cut your hair and stuck at home? Advice on how to cut your hair at home from salons across the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Poll: 56% of Democrats polled by Club for Growth would prefer Cuomo over Biden for 2020. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Governor Cuomo is setting a high bar for himself coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic. On Good Morning America, he said “There has to be some lesson that we take from this so we’re better for it because we paid a very high price. One of them is, let’s understand what happened with the African American/Latino communities, and let’s fix it and let’s understand broadly how this lapped and what we missed so this doesn’t happen again.” (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Who was at fault between de Blasio and Cuomo for the public debate about who can close the city’s schools? It’s de Blasio, of course. Before making his “we’re closing the schools” announcement, de Blasio left a text message with the governor a few minutes before making the announcement. (Jesse McKinley, Eliza Shapiro and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

It was only a few hours before the governor had to teach Mayor de Blasio who has the legal authority to close the city’s schools. The answer, by the way, is Governor Cuomo. (Sally Goldenberg and Anna Gronewold for Politico)

The MTA claims overcrowding isn’t a problem on the subways, Mayor de Blasio isn’t buying it. The mayor wants the MTA to increase their capacity, but the MTA’s workforce has been his disproportionally hard by COVID-19. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The MTA is checking temperatures of its workers at 22 of its locations to test 2,000 workers a day. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

58 of the city’s 110 nursing facilities have been cited for infection control problems. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

If you want a look at what NYC’s pandemic open streets could have been, take a look at Oakland’s plan for 74 miles of streets for cyclists and pedestrians. (Roger Rudick for Streetsblog)

A clarification on the bodies buried on Hart Island, the mayor has said that anyone who has a family or friend who wants to make funeral arrangements, the body will be held until it is possible. Unclaimed bodies will be interred on Hart Island. (Robert Rozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Fairway is trying to argue in bankruptcy court that its bonuses of $2.3 million for executives are well deserved. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

A $769,000 studio that’s roughly 350 square feet on Billionaire’s Row is being called “reasonable” by 6sqft. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Opera is continuing its streams of opera performances this week. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

A guide to the city’s caterers that are pivoting to home delivery. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

The Briefly for April 10, 2020 – The “Bodegas and Fran Lebowitz Will Be There When Things Go to Hell” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Normplay, Cuomo doesn’t share de Blasio’s optimism, SNL works from home, Lincoln Center’s summer programming is canceled, restaurant spices, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 50˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 44˚ High: 61˚

When the Governor is begging the nation to send healthcare workers to New York, imagine how shitty you have to be to threaten to fire your employees for speaking out about bad conditions in your hospital. Instead, hospital administrators are encouraging “appropriate” social media posts with uplifting messages instead. The City Council is planning legislation to prohibit the firing of health care workers for speaking publicly about hospital conditions. (Noam Scheiber and Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

Video: It’s almost weird to see videos of people crowded into Times Square. (ActionKid)

Plans to turn Cathedral of St. John the Divine into a hospital have hit the breaks. The public story is that a leveling off in infections is the reason, but there are also tensions between the church’s leaders and Samaritan’s Purse, the company operating Central Park’s field hospitals, who hold anti-Muslim and anti-LGBTQ stances. (Liam Stock for NY Times)

New Yorkers always know that when everything goes to hell, we can count on our bodegas. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

“Never. It didn’t even occur to me. The morning of September 11th, someone called me and said, “We’re going to Connecticut. We can pick you up. Do you want to go?” I was just shocked that anyone would want to leave. I’m not leaving. In fact, I feel that I am like the designated New Yorker. Everyone else can leave. This is beyond saddening for me, to see the town this way.” –Fran Lebowitz is never leaving New York City. (Michael Schulman for The New Yorker)

Inside Coronavirus: Chinatown Stories, a video series making an effort to bring attention and love to Chinatown and Welcome to Chinatown, a grassroots initiative to support Chinatown restaurants. (Cathy Erway for Grub Street)

If you’ve been wondering “Why are the city’s landmarks lit up blue?,” it’s for the city’s essential workers. It started at Windsor Castle in the UK last month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

In praise of making noise at 7 pm every night. (Amanda Hess for NY Times)

Everyone can submit an absentee ballot for the June 23 Democratic primary, thanks to an announcement from Governor Cuomo. (Emily Davenport for QNS)

Are you one of the 1/3 of renters in the country who didn’t pay April’s rent on time? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A look inside the U.S. Open stadium’s makeshift hospital. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

The story of how the Yankees became the Yankees, 107 years later. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Traffic is down 60% on the BQE and speeds are up 288%. Proof that when you remove cars from the streets, the remaining vehicles can travel faster. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Have you hit the point where you miss all of the city’s inconveniences? Try Normplay. Nothing will make you appreciate staying at home like re-creating the pains of living in the city. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor is feeling optimistic about relaxing the city’s quarantine at the end of May, but Governor Cuomo doesn’t share his optimism. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

PHotos: Separate, but together. Portraits of New Yorkers under quarantine. (Caroline Spivack with photos by Johnny Cirillo for Curbed)

Saturday Night Live is doing a “work from home” episode this weekend in what will surely be one of the weirdest television experiences of this pandemic. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

All of Lincoln Center’s summer programming is canceled for 2020. Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Midsummer Night Swing, and Mostly Motzart are all canceled. It’s not all bad news, they’re planning a pop-up festival for whenever we’re allowed to go outside again. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

There are a lot of dark clouds lately, but let’s discover the silver linings. (6sqft)

Looking to emulate your favorite dishes from your favorite restaurants? Here are some restaurants in the city selling their spices and seasonings. (Luke Forney for Eater)

“We’re working with Google to come up with an online mechanism that bypasses any phone certification.” -The governor is working with Google to update the state’s unemployment verification process and remove phone verification, the hardest part of completing an unemployment claim. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The New York Historical Society wants your paper and digital ephemera that document all aspects of the current crisis. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral Easter Mass is being streamed to Facebook and YouTube this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Hart Island, the city’s potter’s field, normally sees about 25 new bodies buried by inmates each week. Lately, it’s two dozen bodies a day and contract laborers have been brought in to perform the burials. The photography in this article is absolutely chilling. (Christopher Robbins, Sydney Pereira, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The latest slap in the face to restauranteurs and their staffs is GoFundMe making it difficult for the donated funds to be withdrawn. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Times asks “Did New Yorkers Who Fled to Second Homes Bring the Virus?” The answer is yes. (Sarah Maslin Nir and Tracey Tully for NY Times)

10 great cookbooks and cocktail books from NYC restaurants and bars. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The Briefly for January 15, 2020 – The “New Yorkers, Known Historically for Their Patience” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Nine things New Yorkers will judge you for, adoptees can see their original birth certificates, the three remaining four star restaurants in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

Op-Ed: Public Advocate Jumaane Williams on how knee-jerk reactions have drowned out common sense conversation and reform when it comes to desegregating the city’s schools when it comes to the gifted and talented program. (Jumaane Williams for amNewYork Metro)

If a fire breaks out in your apartment and you flee, make sure to close the door behind you. An open door turned a one apartment fire into multi-hour ordeal that left 22 people injured in an Upper West Side high-rise. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

An off-duty Secret Service agent shot and killed a dog in Brooklyn early Tuesday morning, claiming the dog was “unleashed and aggressive,” despite photos form the scene showing a leash peeking out from under a white sheet. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor is urging patience when it comes to the BQE panel report, saying last week’s leak of the report was only partial and everyone should “see the whole thing and judge when we all get to look at it.” Yes, New York City is known for its patience and ability to wait before jumping to a conclusion. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Next month McNally Jackson is set to open a new store in CityPoint in Downtown Brooklyn. (Craig Hubert for Brownstoner)

A guerrilla art installation using decommissioned railroad corridor in Queens is meant to question the ongoing cycle of building, abandonment and redevelopment looming over the city. Railroad Eraser by Aaron Asis highlights the unused corridor with white paint on the tracks. While temporary, it’ll be there until the area is redeveloped. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Stop eating sad salads. How to game the salad bar at lunch, from 11 hefts and food writers. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Nine things New Yorkers will judge tourists for and nine things they won’t. Wearing flip-flops and eating bagels at Dunkin making the “judging” list, as I’m pretty sure they are both classified as misdemeanors in Manhattan. (Mary Lane for New York Cliche)

Prospect Park’s Concert Grove Pavilion is getting a $2 million renovation. The pavilion was designed by Calvert Vaux, one of the park’s original architects, and has been roped off from the public since 2014 due to structural issues. Along with the renovation, the “Oriental Pavilion” is likely to be renamed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Starting today, adoptees in the state who are over 18 can request their previously sealed original birth certificates. The law was passed by the state’s legislature and signed in November, making New York the 10th state with unrestricted access to birth certificates. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The city is sending a 24-person team to Puerto Rico to assist in the relief efforts following almost 2,000 earthquakes since December 28. The team heading down are building inspectors, engineers, emergency managers, and mental health professionals. The governor also sent a team and personally went to survey the damage as well. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A tale of two diners (and a competitive review) in Clinton Hill. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

A man walked into a Sunday mass in Brooklyn and doused the priest and altar with bright red juice. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Liquiteria, which claimed to be the city’s first cold-pressed juice bar, closed all five NYC locations abruptly and have all but disappeared online. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Bronx saw the highest wage jump in the state from the second quarter of 2018 to second quarter of 2019 with a 5.7% increase. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics report doesn’t indicate a reason, but the state’s minimum wage increases probably have something to do with it. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s newest celebrity is the Staten Island Bus Raccoon, who tried to jump aboard an S44 bus and being thwarted by some closed doors. The NYPD relocated the raccoon. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Turn back the clock with 20 photos of the city form the 1920s. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

The MTA is taking issue with the report that says 4/5 commutes in 2019 we’re delayed due to signal issues. They’ve not refuted the data, instead saying “the devil is in the details.” Technically, 78% of commutes delayed isn improvement from 2018’s 92%. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Six New York City corrections officers were arrested on Tuesday in connection to a drug-smuggling ring on Rikers Island. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Is it the year of glowing seesaws? The city’s second set of glowing seesaws have been set up next to Pier 17, each making unique sounds. The seesaws will be at Pier 17 through March. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

What’s the oldest bar in Brooklyn? It’s a complicated answer. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Perhaps inspired by yesterday’s Mama’s Too meatball parm news, Robert Sietsema has declared where you can find his favorite meatball parm in the city at Faicco’s Italian Specialties•. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Rockefeller Center may be headed for a renovation, depending if owner Tichman Speyer can get approval from the landmarks commission. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

How New York became Gotham City from Joker‘s production designer Mark Friedberg. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The cottage where Edgar Allan Poe wrote “Annabel Lee” and “The Bells” is in the Bronx. The Edgar Allan Poe Cottage was built in 1812 and is at 2640 Grand Concourse, where Poe lived in 1846 with his wife and mother-in-law. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

A book that Anthony Bourdain was working on before his death with co-author Laurie Woolever will be published on October 13. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Congress approved a measure last month to reinstate two-way tolls on the Verrazzano, but the MTA has announced no set date for the change to happen. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The City owns most of the land adjacent to the Coney Island boardwalk and leases it to Zamperla, who operates Luna Park and leases to shops and places to eat on the boardwalk like Lola Star, Nathan’s, Ruby’s, Tom’s Restaurant, and the Coney Island Beach Shop. Zamperla is trying to raise rents between 50 and 400% for the independent businesses. When the Times attempted to reach Zamperla officials for comment, they were vacationing in Italy. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

The water main that played havoc with the Upper Wets Side and Monday morning’s subway commutes was 98 years old. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Ahead of his anticipated Hall of Fame induction, two Bronx City Councilmembers are introducing legislation to rename East 161st Street as “Jeter Street.” (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Pete Wells from the Times knocked Sushi Nakazawa from four stars to three, leaving only three restaurants in the city with four stars, Jean-Georges, Le Bernardin, and Eleven Madison Park. (Sara Boinsteel for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s best ramen restaurants. (Julien Levy for Thrillist)