The Briefly for January 14, 2020 – The “AOC vs Cuomo, Round 2” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The AG looks at the NYPD’s subway fare evasion, how Tiffany’s moved hundreds of millions in jewlery, the head of Brooklyn’s democrats resigns, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 48˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

How do you move hundreds of millions of dollars in view of the public in NYC without getting robbed? Very carefully. Here’s the story of how Tiffany’s moved everything in its store overnight. (James Barron for NY Times)

Attorney General Letitia James announced on Monday that her office would investigate the NYPD and if its fare evasion policing in the subways has illegally targeted New Yorkers of color. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The winners and losers of the Queens bus network redesign. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Cuomo’s AirTrain is about to hit a new obstacle: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

There are thirteen million registered voters in New York state, with one million designated as “inactive,” and whose names were not on the voter rolls at election sites, which is a violation of the 14th Amendment and the National Voting Rights Act of 1993 according to a federal judge. While it may seem trivial, remember that the Queens DA race was decided by 55 votes. Moving forward, all registered voters’ names will be available at polling sites. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Information on how to register to vote.

The leader of the Brooklyn Democratic Party, Frank Seddio, is stepping down amid concerns about the party’s and his own finances. Seddio is facing $2.2 million in lawsuits and the party’s cash reserves have dwindled from $505,000 in 2013 to $32,800 in 2019. (Aidan Graham and Kevin Duggan for amNewYorkMetro)

Photos: When it comes to the city’s skies, birds usually get all the attention. Don’t forget the city’s bats. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

RIP Matthew Maher, owner of McSorley’s since the 60s. The bar is staying in the family, daughter Teresa Maher de a Haba is the owner now. (EV Grieve)

Here are the top ten checked out books in the NYPL’s history. You’ll notice a theme running through the list. “Goodnight Moon” did not make the list do to a personal vendetta against the book by children’s librarian Anne Carroll Moore. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Have you seen “The Geographic Center of NYC” in Woodside on the corner of 58th Street and Queens Boulevard? Besides being a cool piece of trivia it’s also completely wrong. If this isn’t the place, where is it? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

If your usual subway station is outdoors, the winters can be brutal. A century ago, the IRT provided potbelly stoves in stations for its riders to stay warm while waiting for the train. (Ephemeral New York)

Signal problems ruined about four out of every five morning commutes in 2019, according to a new Riders Alliance analysis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The L train showdown is running ahead of schedule and should be completed by April, but not without some weekend closures. The MTA announced the weekends of January 17, February 14, and March 20 with closures from 8th Av to Broadway Junction. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

In addition to the L construction, the MTA announced emergency overnight construction was necessary on the G train this week through Friday night from midnight to 1:30am. (Greenpointers)

On a dry day, the MTA pumps 13 million gallons of water from its system. Monday’s water main break added half a million gallons to that, causing chaos on the 4, 5, 6, A, B, and C lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s time to declare the days of the cooking competition celebrity chef over. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It started as an argument between two dads about their kids near Dyker Park, but it turned into a double stabbing. One was stabbed in the chest and neck and the other was stabbed in the leg. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

In terms of housing and transportation costs, NYC ranks tenth in the nation, right after Houston but right before Minneapolis-St Paul. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Baby Yoda has a mural in the East Village. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The plan to rezone Bushwick hit a possibly fatal roadblock Monday after city officials and local politicians failed to reach an agreement on affordable housing requirements. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The de Blasio administration testified at a 2019 City Council meeting that they did not have information about who was riding the heavily subsidized NYC Ferry system. The mayor used his insistence that the boats were being used by low-income New Yorkers as justification to dramatically expand the ferry system. It was all a lie, because the city’s Economic Development Corporation had already conducted two rider surveys that showed the median income of riders was over $100,000. For each rider on the ferry that pays $2.75, the city pays $9.34. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Vans opened Skate Space 198, a free indoor skatepark right off the Jefferson stop in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYCHA residents filed about 59,770 bug infestation complaints in the first nine months of 2019, according to the Legal Aid Society. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What’s the best pizza in NYC? In honor of National Pizza Week, Patch asked politicians, comedians, and Broadway stars where to get their favorite slice. It’s mostly unconventional picks for the city’s best, even if Chuck Schumer’s pick is one of the closest pizza places to his apartment. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mama’s Too, on the list, is rolling out a meatball parm that is already being described as “the city’s best meatball parm.” (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The Briefly for April 18, 2019 – The “Tough Talk From A Mayor Who Can’t Back It Up” Edition

A five-alarm fire in Marine Park, poking more holes in congestion pricing, the view from Brooklyn’s tallest tower, universal rent control and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The view from the top of Brooklyn’s tallest tower is magnificent, but it’ll only be the tallest tower for a short period of time. (Curbed)

The latest hole poked in the city’s congestion pricing condom is for Bronx residents, who will not have to pay to cross the Henry Hudson Bridge. (Streets Blog)

Mayor de Blasio touts the NYC Ferry system for addressing some of New York’s “historic inequities,” despite having literally zero evidence to back up his claim. (amNY)

The mayor claims the reason for his crackdown on electric bikes has been safety, but he’s either willfully lying or he’s pathetically uninformed. Neither option is great. There were 45,775 motor vehicle collisions that resulted in injuries, 31 of those involving electric bikes and 23 of those were injuries to the rider of the bike. Zero pedestrians were killed by bikes, electric or otherwise. (Streetsblog)

The NYPD only cost the city $230 million in settlements last year. $25.4 million of that was a settlement in a federal class-action lawsuit related to the NYPD’s illegal arrest quotas, which the NYPD denies is still happening, while it is still very much happening. (Gothamist)

The mayor declared Tuesday “Jin Park Day” in honor of Harvard student Jin Park, the first undocumented Rhodes scholar in history who has been a longtime NYC resident. (Huff Post)

The 16 best French restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

The $3 billion Amazon tax subsidy is dead. Are any lawmakers daring enough to go after the film tax credit, which has given out $6.5 billion in subsidies in the last fifteen years? (Gothamist)

Take a video tour of Brooklyn… from 1949. (js4653)

How to find temporary student housing in the city. (StreetEasy)

Long Island City’s Noguchi Museum is making a 6,000 square foot expansion and opening Noguchi’s original studio building. The expansion is expected to be finished by 2021. (Curbed)

10 iconic Bushwick landmarks. None of them involve unicycles, Four Loko can structures, mustache wax, or eight people living in a two bedroom apartment. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With the Democrats in firm control of New York, tenants are seeing more protections, which may include “universal rent control.” (NY Times)

Rent control is good for cities according to a new study. The city’s welfare went up when rent control increased. The reduction of the housing supply was outweighed by the positive effect of not worrying about losing your home. (Gothamist)

A closer look at how Oregon implemented Universal Rent Control to stop a crisis of displacement and gentrification. (Curbed)

Surprise the Harry Potter fan in your life with reservations to The Wizard Brunch when it hits NYC, which recreates an experience that is close but not to an infringing level, of eating at Hogwarts. (Time Out)

Avoid spicy tuna rolls and all raw tuna for a while. The CDC and FDA flagged it as part of a recall of Salmonella-tainted tuna coming from a company in Louisiana. New York was one of 13 states affected. Go for vegetarian options. (Gothamist)

Where to get rid of your unwanted shit when doing your spring cleaning. (6sqft)

Continuing his Justice 2020 push to move away from an over-reliance of jailing people, Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez announced a softer parole policy for Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The City’s Board of Health mandatory measles vaccination was upheld in a unanimous Health Department vote. No one has been fined $1,000, but over 500 children have been vaccinated in the last week. (Gothamist)

Street vendors will take over empty subway storefronts in Corona, thanks to a partnership with the MTA announced State Senator Jessica Ramos. (Curbed)

Where to get a Passover meal in the city. (Patch)

A Brooklyn Supreme Court judge temporarily blocked a plan to build two 16-story rental buildings, the construction of the buildings is opposed by activist groups and the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Gothamist)

We are one step closer to a five-cent fee for a paper bags once the plastic bag ban is enacted. (amNY)

It took about four hours, but nearly 200 firefighters put out a five-alarm fire in Marine Park. (Bklyner)

The M14 needs to step it up before the L Project ruins your trip to Williamsburg for brunch according to Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. Maybe she didn’t say the brunch part. (amNY)

A new law will prevent ICE from making arrests inside courthouses without judicial warrants. (TIme)

Happy Easter this Sunday, that’s also the day the city’s subways and buses will rise. (amNY)

A man was arrested for trying to carry two gas cans, two bottles of lighter fluid, and two butane lighters into St. Patricks Cathedral. He claims he was just cutting through the Cathedral to Madison Ave. Dude, come on. (NY Times)

Rents in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens have hit an all-time high. Prices dropped in Williamsburg and Greenpoint, but now that Cuomo’s L Project has taken over for the L Shutdown, kiss that trend goodbye. Where is Jimmy McMillan when we need him? (StreetEasy)

Where to eat regionally inspired Mexican food in the city. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.