The Briefly for September 1, 2020 – The “A $3.75 Reduced-Service Subway Ride” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest with school openings, the mayor wants a vaccine before indoor dining returns, where to eat outside in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 78˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

Today (Sept 1), the United Federation of Teachers’ executive board will meet to vote to authorize a strike at 3:30 pm. From a friend, I’ve heard the teachers will push for an October opening of school for in-person instruction. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Looking to make a temporary change in your address? The Times has some service journalism for you to make sure your mail gets delivered. (A.C. Shilton for NY Times)

Free bus rides are over. Front boarding started on Monday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A bus or subway fare could be raised a dollar, as hinted by MTA officials, paired with a 40% reduction in service, in an attempt to close the $9 billion gap in the MTA’s budget. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

Five cheap ways to improve the subway from a policy analyst from the Manhattan Institute. Not all of these ideas are good. (Connor Harris for Streetsblog)

There is no combination of state efforts that can address New York’s financial crisis. The full damage that the Covid-19 virus has laid upon New York state is $59 billion, meaning there is no possible way the state can tax its way out of this hole. Watch this argument carefully, because Governor Cuomo will use this to defend his decision to never increase taxes on the state’s super-rich. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state kicked the can down the road, but October 1 is the new date for the tidal wave of evictions when the moratorium ends. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The mayor created his own deadline of October 1 to either cut one billion from the city’s costs from labor or he would fire 22,000 municipal employees. On Monday, the day city employees were ready to hear about who was “at-risk” for being fired, the mayor announced that unions have asked for more time to resolve the issue. The sword of Damocles still hangs. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

September 1 gives us two months left of outdoor dining in NYC. As bars and restaurants look ahead, the question becomes “How do we survive this?” A spotlight on Jeremy’s Ale House, who doesn’t see past Halloween, unless people are allowed inside. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The biggest question looming over the city might not be “when will The Briefly return to five days a week?,” but “when is indoor dining coming back?” The mayor’s answer seems to change every day. In the last week, he’s said that the school openings would dictate it, that it wouldn’t return until the new year, and now until we see a vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How much is a life worth? Layleen Polanco’s family was awarded $5.9 million after her death after nine days in solitary confinement at Rikers Island while being held on $500 bail, a record for an inmate’s death. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The NYPD has issued a “discipline penalty matrix” that outlines specific punishments for instances of police misconduct. This isn’t in response to recent violence from the NYPD against the citizens it is supposed to protect, but form the recommendation of a 2018 independent panel. Despite the matrix, the NYPD Commissioner has the ability to ignore the matrix. The NYCLU says this is no reason to celebrate because it doesn’t show a culture of change in the NYPD and Commissioner Shea and Mayor de Blasio’s comments appear to be on the side of protecting police officers. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A 2017 NYPD “challenge coin” from East Flatbush is so racist you may have to see it to believe it that celebrates the “hunting of man” and features a caricature of a black man with dreadlocks with the shadow of a deer. (Jon Campbell for Gothamist)

Riis Park’s popularity in the last few years partially has Riis Park Beach Bazaar to thank. The lease for Riis Park Beach Bazaar is up and won’t be renewed. Instead, they have been invited to submit a proposal to compete with other vendors. (The Rockaway Times)

This is what life is like when you’re quarantined in an apartment with Miss Universe and Miss USA. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Gyms in the city will be virtually inspected before reopening on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Yeah, you’ve been to Governors Island, but have you been to the haunted basketball court on Governors Island? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Sutphin Blvd-Archer Ave. and Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer E train stations will be closed from September 19 through November as the MTA replaces 5,500 feet of track and more than 7,800 feet of third rail. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s pronounced “How-stun.” Here’s why. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

One of the three lawsuits blocking the Two Bridges megadevelopment was reversed, but it’s still not a green light to move forward. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The city’s land use review process comes back mid-month, which will mean Gowanus will become the epicenter of the fight over redevelopment in the city. (Amy Plitt for BKLYNER)

“The fight against Industry City has implications beyond the neighborhood. It has implications for any of us who see the city as a site of civic engagement, as a place where community thrives. It’s community, the very idea of it, that’s destroyed, as the privatization of neighborhoods grows bolder and less restrained.”
– Peter Rugh, Sunset Park is Afraid of Industry City’s Expansion, The Rest of Us Should Be Too for The Indypendent

The Mermaid Inn in the East Village is closing. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at waacking and its history from dance clubs in the city in the 70s and how it ended up as a Tik Tok sensation. (Ted Alcorn, video by Mohamed Sadek for NY Times)

Columbia University removed “pretty significant” slave owner Samuel Bard’s name from Bard Hall, with a promise to rename the building in the fall. (Amanda Rosa for NY Times)

Why was a statue of Christopher Columbus and the green space surrounding it in the Bronx’s Little Italy locked up? The Parks Department says it was a staff error. The statue has been protected by the NYPD since June. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Former Queens DA hopeful Tiffany Cabán is expected to run for City Council in Astoria when Costa Constantinides’s term limit is up in 2021. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Where to eat out on Staten Island. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 3, 2020 – The “Fired Anywhere But New York City” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s staff keeps quitting, 15 new Open Restaurant streets, AOC weighs in on the Port Authority’s federal funding, a whale saved, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Tuesday is looking rough in the city. Tropical Storm Isaias is predicted to hit the city sometime Tuesday afternoon. Just in time for my dogs to need a walk. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

“I’m telling you we’re going to have an issue.” Governor Cuomo isn’t an optimist when it comes to the city’s economic recovery. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Katz’s launched its own delivery service. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The mayor has been suspending alternate side parking on and off for months and he was never aware that the city uses street cleaning days for bike lane work. Good thing the mayor spent all that effort to “lighten the burden” of car ownership, in his own words. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor is doing such a great job serving the city that six high-ranking staffers of Mayor de Blasio’s have quit in the last month. As everyone knows, there’s no better time to leave your government job than during an economic crisis in the middle of a pandemic for a mayor who will be out of office in less than two years. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Calls for NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea to resign have grown louder in the past few weeks. The pandemic and protests following the murder of George Floyd have shown that the NYPD’s commissioner has the back of the citizens of the NYPD and not the citizens of NYC and has exacerbated problems between the two. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

It’s hard to imagine another city where the commissioner, who is appointed by and serves at the pleasure of the mayor, would keep their job in the face of everything that Dermot Shea has said and done, but most cities aren’t governed by the coward Bill de Blasio. Sometimes I editorialize in these moments, but this piece in the Times looks at just how weird it is that Shea has kept his job despite almost a decade of de Blasio calling for police reforms. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Following Andrew Coté, who spent his pandemic rescuing beehives across the city. (Stephanie Simon)

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was hit with a $777 million drop in revenues in the first half of the year and is pleading for federal assistance, potentially losing $3 billion by March 2022. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

“While some of this funding may be critical to stabilize Port Authority operations, no funding should be provided to the AirTrain; the AirTrain is an unnecessary boondoggle that will hamper economic recovery in our watershed, a region in Northern Queens that has been heavily impacted by Covid-19,” -AOC (Angélica Acevedo for QNS)

You might have done everything right when it came to your absentee ballot and the Board of Elections still may have invalidated it. In a misunderstanding between the state and the post office, it’s possible the post office didn’t postmark your ballot and it also didn’t deliver it before the June 30 deadline. The exact number of rejected ballots will be announced on Tuesday. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Even if we admit that everyone who touched the ballots (except voters) was at fault, what are the next steps? We’re expecting a ruling this week in a court case that will decide the fate of many of these invalidated votes. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

One of the things that sucks the most about the voting mess from the June 23 primary is that the city is now being held up by President Trashbag as a reason to not move forward with mail-in voting. There was no malfeasance involved, but the state and the federal government let us down with a failure to perform in June and we don’t have much time before November roars through. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

It has taken the city an embarrassingly long amount of time to create the No-Penalty Business Accessory Sign Inspection program in reaction to the panic going around small businesses after hundreds of complaints were filed in November of 2018, leading to many businesses just ripping their signs down in confusion/fear. It shouldn’t take a deadly pandemic for the city to help small businesses become compliant with regulations. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Top of the Rock will reopen this Thursday with free admission to essential workers and a guest from August 14-16. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

American Museum of Natural History is reopening on Sept. 9, pending permission from state and city officials, with a 25% capacity. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

Ronny Vargas and Alex Sauzo were arrested for throwing an illegal and non-socially distanced three-hour boat party in the East River with 17u2 people aboard. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A humpback whale was successfully freed by NOAA over the weekend after being entangled in a mess of buoys and fishing line for several days. Humpback whales returning to NYC’s waterways is a positive sign that preservation efforts are working, but also a sign that we’ll need to continue those efforts to keep them safe. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Photos: If you don’t have an easy means to see it yourself, there is a tribute to Elijah McClain by artist Vincent Ballentine in the First Street Green Art Park. (EV Grieve)

3% is the city’s threshold for keeping the schools open. As long as the city’s seven-day rolling average positivity rate stays below 3%, schools will stay open. The rate has been between 1% and 2% for about two months. The city will no mandate that staff or students get tested for Covid-19. The chair of the City Council’s education committee calls the city’s plans “an unfunded proposal that is incomplete.” The head of the teacher’s union says “This is not enough to protect students and staff.” (Elizabeth Kim and David Cruz for Gothamist)

15 more streets were added to the city’s Open Restaurants program, which allows restaurants to expand into the streets on the weekend. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

NYPD officer Kevin Martin was arrested and charged with evidence tampering and official misconduct. Martin has been the subject of 14 investigations by the Civilian Complaint Review Board and 18 of the 45 different allegations brought against him have been substantiated and he was named in six lawsuits, which cost the city over $1 million in settlements. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Good morning to Murphy, the newborn harbor seal pup in the New York Aquarium in Coney Island. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The MTA is trying out six new kinds of subway maps. If you want to see them in person, take the R all the way to 86th St in Brooklyn, or just look at the photos. (Ben Yakas, photos by Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

17 public art installations not to miss in August, including the new installation in the Socrates Sculpture Park. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

An airport replacing Central Park? Is this some sort of joke? Yes, it is. (Josh Vogel for NYC Urbanism)

11 food and drink pop-ups in NYC this summer. Happy to see Bad Trip on the list in Dumbo, it’s my favorite of this summer’s picks. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 6, 2020 – The “Another Sign of the Apocalypse” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase three starts today, where to eat hot dogs, Dekalb Market goes above ground, The NYPD’s SpotShotter is put to the test, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 88˚
Rain in the evening.

Today starts phase three of the city’s reopening. Here’s what you can and can’t do under phase three. First and foremost, don’t stop wearing your damn masks. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Everyone’s got a friend outside the city that’s been talking about moving here on and off. Here’s a link you can send them instead of answering every question they have. How to know if you’re ready fo move to NYC. (Localize.City)

You’d think business interruption insurance would cover a moment like the Covid-19 pandemic, where businesses were… interrupted. You’d be giving the insurance industry too much credit, because they’ve been rejecting claims because businesses haven’t paid for “pandemic insurance.” (Peter Senzamici for The City)

Sound familiar? That’s because insurers were turning down business interruption insurance claims by the thousands after Hurricane Sandy, blaming specific damage on a flood at a Con Ed substation on E. 14th St. (Reuven Blau for Daily News in 2013)

There’s something killing the fish in the Hudson River. While officials say it’s nothing to be alarmed about, it’s hard to not see this as another sign of the apocalypse. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Ailing parents, dying family members, and economic insecurity, and all while trying to graduate high school. (Rebecca Klein for HuffPost)

Video: A look at the history of the “Freedom” tunnel that runs under Riverside Park and how it became the canvas for Chris “Freedom” Pape’s art and a homeless community. (Vice)

In the last month, there have been 95 lawsuits against the Archdiocese of New York with dozens more on the way. When Covid-19 put a pause on all court cases except “essential matters,” it paused all the court cases against the church, prompting the state’s legislature to extend the window for filing cases from January 2021 until August. The governor hasn’t signed the legislation yet, prompting the sudden flood. (Virginia Breen for The City)

The price of renting a one-bedroom apartment in the city dropped 2% and two-bedroom dropped 0.3% in June and rents are 5% down from last year, according to a new report from Zumper. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

In 2018, the Gowanus Canal’s 4th St basin was supposedly cleaned of “Black Mayo,” aka coal tar, by the EPA as a pilot program for the entire waterway. Work on cleaning the entire canal was scheduled to start later this year, using the same techniques. This week, unfortunately, the black mayo returned. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Dog owners are turning to CBD dog treats amid the endless stream of fireworks leading up to July 4. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1, congrats on the new job Kathleen)

The pandemic has brought a classic NYC staple back: rooftop culture. (Monika Hankova for Untapped New York)

Dekalb Market, the underground food hall underneath City Point in Downtown Brooklyn is reopening, but not underground. It will be taking over a portion of Gold Street and Willoughby Square Park as a reimagined Dekalb “Open-Air” Market. (Meaghan McGoldrick for amNewYork Metro)

Rafael Espinal couldn’t have picked a worse time to abandon his post as the City Councilmember for Brooklyn’s 37th District if he tried, essentially robbing his former constituents of their voice through the Covid-19 pandemic, protests, and city budget/defund the NYPD debates. A special election was canceled by Governor Cuomo and Bushwick, East New York, and Cypress Hills won’t have representation on the City Council until Janaury. (Nigel Roberts for The Brooklyn Reader)

Van Leeuwen Ice Cream is introducing their summer flavors this week. How does Caramelized Banana Praline sound? (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The union representing 30,000 faculty and staff at CUNY is suing, alleging CUNY violated the terms of its federal bailout by laying off hundreds of adjunct faculty members, and are demanding that they be rehired. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Tips from a hospital stint on protecting yourself from Covid-19. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

What’s the purpose of legal observers if the NYPD keep arresting them? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

It’s been half a year since the mayor boasted to the press about the NYPD and Department of Homeless Services’ command center. A look at the change coming now that the NYPD are being kicked out. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

A memorial was held for Pop Smoke on Friday night outside his parents’ house in Canarsie the night of his album “Shoot for the Stars, Aim for the Moon.” (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re headed to the city’s beaches, there’s nothing that says you can’t combine the city’s new hobby of birdwatching with your beach-going. It’s piping plover nesting season, so keep an eye out for the endangered (and super cute) bird! (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo instituted a mandatory 14-day quarantine if you’re traveling to New York from 16 different states. How is it being enforced? 🤷‍♂️ (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Highlights from NBC’s recap of a week of “surprise” fireworks displays from Macy’s, including an unexplained shot of a building in South Korea for some reason? (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

The rats have been quiet, but with restaurants opening, expect that to change. (Amy Pearl for Gothamist)

Visitors are now able to go to the September 11th Memorial for the first time since March. The museum is still closed. (NY1)

The Strand is opening its Upper West Side location this month on Columbus Ave between 81st and 82nd St, the former home of Book Culture. (Sara Lebwohl for I Love The Upper West Side)

A rundown of the fatal five shootings in the city Sunday. (Todd Maisel for amNewyork Metro)

SpotShotter, the system the NYPD uses to detect gunshots, is under a real test with all the fireworks around the city. The system is, pardon the pun, shoddy at best, and its implementation has resulted in the targeting of Black and brown communities. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

RIP Nick Cordero, Tony-nominated Broadway performer, who passed away due to Covid-19. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The de Blasio administration is giving up on the idea of reworking the Brooklyn Bridge promenade, leaving the pedestrian and cyclist nightmare for the city’s next mayor. Here are Scott Stringer, Corey Johnson, and Eric Adams’ takes on the future of the bridge. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More people are riding the MTA’s buses than subways for the first time since volume numbers have been kept. (Christina Goldblum and Winnie Hu for NY Times)

A look at the history of Firemen’s Garden on E 8th St, where the NYFD’s Martin Celic lost his life in 1977. (Ephemeral New York)

A guide to the real-life NYC locations from Hamilton. (Untapped New York)

Congrats to Joey Chestnut and Miki Sudo, this year’s hot dog eating champions who both set new records and are $10,000 richer for it. (ESPN)

Where to eat hot dogs this summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Thrillist)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!