The Briefly for June 29, 2020 – The “Even Aliens and UFOs Have Left New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Macy’s unannounced fireworks start tonight, the NYPD pepper-sprays a Pride march, open street dining, beaches opening this week and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

Get ready, because tonight starts Macy’s ill-conceived fireworks displays across the city for the next five nights. The city said they will send notifications a few minutes before they start(Ron Lee for NY1)

The story of Charlie H. Cochrane, Jr., the NYPD’s first openly gay cop, who joined the force in 1967. (Carey Reed Zamarriego for Untapped Cities)

Photos: Pride Weekend’s Drag March. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

More Photos: The Drag March. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD celebrated Pride in their traditional style by pepper-spraying and arresting participants of the Queer Liberation March during a dance party in Washington Square Park. (Duncan Osborne for Gothamist)

Answering questions about the availability of the NYPD’s disciplinary records, which will become available in July. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

17 members of the city’s Corrections Department will face departmental charges for their roles in the death of Rikers Island inmate Layleen Polanco last June. Bronx District Attorney Darcel D. Clark and the city’s Department of Investigation have refused to pursue criminal charges. (Jan Ransom and Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

How Occupy City Hall’s 24-hour protests came to be. (Juliana Kim, photos by Amr Alfiky for NY Times)

“Yet on day one of his mayoralty, de Blasio betrayed his word—and even more, the Black and Hispanic communities of New York City—by bringing back an even more blatantly discriminatory policing strategy: the practice of aggressive misdemeanor arrests known as “broken windows policing.””
-Bernard E. Harcourt, professor of law and political science at Columbia University, for Gothamist, Mayor De Blasio’s Police Strategy Has Always Been Racist

The number of UFOs reported across America in the first three months of the year shot up by 112%, but New York’s UFO sightings are among the country’s lowest. Even the aliens know it’s not a good time to see the city. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The headline says it best: The Garbage-Scented, Siren-Laden, and Yet Still Pleasant Reality of Dining Outside Right Now (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

There are over 5,650 restaurants open for outdoor dining in the city, the Department of Transportation has an interactive map. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe some of these locations need to be double-checked since they’re in the middle of bike lanes, which is forbidden by the new guidelines. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The experience of a day of phase two inside Veselka. (Ryan Sutton, photos by Gary He for Eater)

Six ways restaurants have been innovating to enforce social distancing. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The state has extended its to-go cocktail laws for an additional 30 days. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five years of lessons learned from writing about food and dining. (Serena Dai for Eater, good luck on your new gig)

“For years, the NYPD has used the city’s public drinking laws as a simple pretext for the harassment of communities of color. Of the 15 city police precincts that wrote the most summonses for open-containers in 2010, 12 were located in communities of color. A separate Brooklyn study found that 85 percent of open container citations in that borough were given to Black and brown residents, and only 4 percent to whites.”
-Shabazz Stuart, CEO of Oonee, for Streetsblog, It’s Time to Legalize Public Drinking for All New Yorkers

Dog runs, basketball courts, tennis courts, volleyball courts, handball courts, and bocce courts are returning to the city’s parks with phase three. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything known about indoor dining, which starts on July 6 in phase three of the city’s reopening. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

For the second time in two decades, the MTA is facing a “doomsday budget.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

James Dolan owns Madison Square Garden and the Knicks and might be one of the biggest idiots in the entire city. The CDC’s website with information on Covid-19 antibodies clearly states “Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.” Has that stopped James Dolan from saying he wants to fill Madison Square Garden with people who have tested positive for antibodies for a benefit show? No it has not. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A deeper dive into the Summer Youth Employment Program, how its elimination by the de Blasio administration disproportionally affects people of color, and why kids are fighting to bring it back. (Rainer Harris for Curbed)

Red Hook’s Fairway will close by July 17. The landlord will look for a grocery store to take its place. (Liena Zagare for BKLYNER)

Mayor de Blasio is calling for a full eviction moratorium through August 20 and for the state place tenants who miss rent on a year-long payment plan to make up for back rent once they are able to work. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

New York Hall of Science won’t be reopening in 2020, opting for a 2021 date. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Getting students into classrooms in the fall, if that is an option at all, will be a difficult task. The CDC calling for children to be six feet apart, which would be impossible in the city’s 150 schools that are already operating at a capacity of 150% or more. For instance, Francis Lewis High School in Queens is built for 2,188, has 4,492 students and capacity will have to be cut to around 1,000. Whatever happens, school will not be returning to normal in the fall. (Ashleigh Garrison for Chalkbeat)

RIP Milton Glaser, who created the I ♥ NY logo. (William Grimes for NY Times)

It’s a great apartment that will be plagued with construction noise through 2035, but you’ll be close to the trains! (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Spring training hasn’t begun yet and Vegas is already predicting a better season for the Yankees than the Mets. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral welcomed people for Sunday Mass for the first time since March. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s affordable housing lottery is anything but fair to the people who can afford the least. For each apartment available for “extremely low-income” families there are 650 applicants. That is nearly 5x as many applicants for apartments for families making between $122k and $168k/year. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Sunday’s double rainbow. What does it mean? (EV Grieve)

Do you know what this city doesn’t need? A sinkhole problem. A sinkhole nearly ate an SUV on the Lower East Side over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

There are nine NYC beaches opening for swimming on July 1st. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 24, 2020 – The “Operation Righteous Cowboy Lightning” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The possible end of the to-go cocktail, fighting white supremacy in museums, Ample Hills finds a buyer, the City Council move to open beaches, and more

Today – Low: 74˚ High: 83˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Tired of waiting for the mayor, the City Council is set to introduce a bill this week that would force the beaches open. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Last night’s primary and election results. It’s still too early to declare winners due to the high volume of absentee voting, but Donovan Richards is leading for Queens Borough President, Jamaal Bowman has a sizable lead over incumbent Eliot Engel, Ritchie Torres is leading the pack in House District 15, AOC is cruising to victory, Yvette Clarke has a large lead, and Jerry Nadler is winning. (NY1)

How did the Democratic primary and election go yesterday?

Over 229,806 absentee ballots distributed in Manhattan for the Democratic primary, only 13% had been received before June 23. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Mayor de Blasio is tackling the city’s biggest problem. Obviously, that problem is Alternate Side Parking. For some reason, the mayor is making ASP more difficult to understand, only demanding that cars be moved once a week instead of multiple times. Of course, this doesn’t apply on streets where cars are only moved once a week. If this sounds complicated, it’s because the mayor took a subject that only pertains to 45% of households in the city and made it complicated. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Kudos to the people who chose to protest the mayor’s inaction on the amount of fireworks regularly being set off by sitting outside Gracie Mansion all night while laying on car horns. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where are the illegal fireworks? Take a look at a map of the ballooning complaints across the city through the month of June. (Sydney Pereira, Clarisa Diaz, Jen Chung, Jake Dobkin, and Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

The mayor announced a crack down on fireworks, but don’t expect any relief on the nightly displays across the city. The mayor’s approach is mostly supply chain based and not enforcement based. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, this may be the king. The mayor announced that instead of a July 4th fireworks display, Macy’s will set off fireworks for five minutes, unannounced, on a nightly basis for every night next week and a highlights package will air on July 4th. This is the literal plot of the 30 Rock episode “Operation Righteous Cowboy Lightning” and it ends poorly. This truly is the Mayor de Blasio of fireworks displays. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Layleen Polanco, the trans woman who died in a Rikers Island solitary confinement cell last year, was pushed there by jailers over a doctor’s objections and despite her seizure disorder, according to a new report from thecdty’s Board of Corrections. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The complaint history of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold caused the death of Eric Garner, has been released and, surprise surprise, Daniel Panteleo was a piece of shit with seven misconduct complaints before using an illegal chokehold on Garner in 2014. (NY1)

The NYPD Tasered George Zapantis to death. Video was taken of Zapantis being taken from his home with hands tied behind his back has surfaced while four or five officers tased him and screamed at him not to resist arrest. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

The city’s criminal courts have a 39,200 case backlog right. The city’s justice is on hold and people waiting for trial are sitting in jail cells. (Alan Feuer, Nicole Hong, Benjamin Weiser and Jan Ransom for The City)

Museums can open their doors, if all goes according to plan, on July 20. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has plans to open on August 29. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

The Met Breuer will be closing for good in July, with The Frick moving in while its home on the Upper East Side gets renovated. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The Museum of Jewish Heritage is laying off over 40% of its staff due to the Covid-19 pandemic. (Colin Moynihan for NY Times)

“We write to inform you that your covert and overt white supremacy that has benefited the institution, through the unrecognized dedication and hard labor of Black/Brown employees, with the expectation that we remain complacent with the status quo, is over.”
An open letter to New York City’s Cultural Institutions

A look at the heroic efforts of the people who step in to help the pets of New Yorkers who become seriously ill with coronavirus. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Over a quarter-million of the city’s food jobs were lost since March, with only about 14,000 returning to work so far. It’s the lowest level of hospitality employment since before 1992. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The city’s cocktail-takeout law expires this weekend. Without action from Governor Cuomo, this is the end of the to-go cocktail. (Erika Adams for Eater)

There are only two kinds of people in the world, according to Serena Day, those who like Van Leeuwen and those who like Ample Hills. Which are you? (Serena Day for Eater)

Ample Hills was sold to Schmitt Industries for one million dollars. They were the only company to submit a qualifying bid. Technically the sale is pending with a court hearing set for June 30. (Erika Adams for Eater)

85 restaurants where you can eat outside today. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 13, 2019 – The “Polling at 0.11% and Not Giving Up” Edition

Corey Johnson opposes the 14th St busway, a Keith Haring work is getting restored, how much can a roommate save you, the history of Gotham, and more in today’s daily NY news digest.

Get ready for some heavy patches of rain today and through tomorrow morning. Good news, it will be clear for John Trivialta at Parklife on Wednesday night! (Patch)

After 100 years of business on the Bowery, Faerman Cash Register Co. has closed its doors for the last time. It’s not high rent that’s pushing them out, it’s real estate taxes. As a result, the family is putting the building up for sale. (Untapped Cities)

Never a person who learns from failure, the mayor says he plans on campaigning even when he doesn’t qualify for the third set of Democratic primary debates in September. The mayor received 23 out of about 20,000 votes in the Iowa “Corn Poll” last week. (Politico)

A video surfaced of the horrific car crash on Coney Island Avenue in Midwood that resulted in the killing of Park Slope’s Jose Alzorriz. This is the second death on Coney Island Avenue in a month and one of 578 crashes in the last year. The mayor was distracted from eating corn dogs and walking around Iowa while polling at 0% support long enough to give a statement. (Gothamist)

Ten secrets of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor when he’s actually in the city. (Untapped Cities)

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, are going to be laser cleaned and have their cracks repaired (the cement ones). (6sqft)

Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson story “The Lightning Thief” is getting a limited run on Broadway that starts in September and runs through January. Also headed to broadway? “Diana,” a musical about Princess Diana will begin in the same theater as “The Lightning Theif” in March. (NY Times)

87 percent of NYCHA apartments went without heat or hot water at some point last winter. Believe it or not, that number represents a decrease from the previous winter. (Curbed)

Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family is suing the city for placing her in solitary confinement when her medical conditions should have forbidden the Department of Corrections from placing her there. (Patch)

We are a month away from the 25th anniversary of ‘Friends’ dominating the city, so the release of a Central Perk LEGO set shouldn’t be a surprise. (6sqft)

Should you move to New York City? Probably not. (Curbed)

The city’s annual topless parade is August 25, one day before Women’s Equality Day, which starts on W 58th and Eighth Ave and continues to Bryant Park. (amNY)

Keith Haring’s “Crack is Wack” on Harlem River Drive in East Harlem is being restored. (6sqft)

“When you see someone being ableist to you or someone else, don’t ignore it, correct it. And for the record, if you see a complete stranger who is also differently-abled, it’s not weird to say “hi.” In a world full of abled body people it’s nice to know that there is someone just like us.” -Sasha Bogen, 2019 graduate of Achievement First Brooklyn High School (Kings County Politics)

The NYPD admitted it subpoenas Google and uses location data collected from Google Maps and other Google applications in order to locate suspects or witnesses. (Gothamist)

Veggie Castle is expanding into Brooklyn. (Time Out)

Arthur Schwartz is the public face of the 14th St busway opposition and protests are scheduled on Wednesday outside of his W. 12th St home. (The Villager)

Corey Johnson, who has regularly stated he wants to break the city’s car culture came out in opposition of the 14th St busway. (amNY)

Roommates in NYC. Can having one save you money? How much can they save you? Let’s find out. (Curbed)

Where did the “Gotham” nickname come from? It’s an insult lobbed at the city by Washington Irving of “Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” fame. (StreetEasy)

The mayor is questioning the circumstances surrounding Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide. (NY Times)

Should government-run and -affiliated pension funds divest from fossil fuel company stock? A look at the politicians pro and anti divestment. (Gotham Gazette)

After her defeat in the Queens DA primary, what’s next for Tiffany Cabán? (NY Times)

Prescriptions for free fruits and vegetables? Yes, as apart of the Pharmacy to farm program. (Huff Post)

Williamsburg’s L’industrie Pizzeria sits atop Eat This, Not That’s list of the best pizza in the state of New York. (Patch)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)