The Briefly for March 3, 2020 – The “Kill it! Kill It All With Bleach!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Inside a Bushwick arts collective, Gale Brewer accidentally violates the Civil Rights Act of 1968, the tale of two of “the city’s best” burgers, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 58˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

A look inside Bohemian Grove, part venue, part apartment building full of artists and performers that are all paying under $1,000 rent and that is, yes, in Bushwick. (Kim Kelsey for NY Times)

Video: A POV experience going to the top of One World Observatory. (ActionKid)

An argument that restaurant letter grades, health inspections, and fines work against the public interest and instead are a great source of revenue for the city. (Demian Repucci for Grub Street)

Governor Cuomo directed NY health insurers to waive cost sharing associated with testing for coronavirus, including emergency room, urgent care and office visits. (@NYGovCuomo)

KILL IT WITH BLEACH. That the’s MTA’s plan to fight the spread of coronavirus on our buses, trains, and schools. New York will never be so clean again. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The numbers of New Yorkers infected with coronavirus will go up, but it does not mean that the virus is spreading. It means we’re identifying the people who have it already. In the meantime, cough and sneeze into your elbow, wash your hands with soap, and please stop touching your face. Are you doing it right now? Stop it. (Jesse McKinley and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

Top 5 pizza shops in the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Whoops. Gale Brewer’s stated argument against the rezoning for Lenox Terrace technically goes against the 1968 Civil Rights Act. Brewer specifically says the rezoning should be stopped to prevent a decrease in the area’s Black population. Attempts to preserve racial composition of a neighborhood goes against the act, even if it the original intention was to criminalize keeping white neighborhoods white. The argument made here lays it on a bit thick, but it highlights why our politicians need to be careful when laying out their arguments. (Nikolai Fedak for New York YIMBY)

Rendering: The Waldorf Astoria’s residents-only pool, 6,000 square feet with 19-foot ceilings and a retractible roof. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Democratic Socialists of America have allies in City Councilmember Costa Costantinides, State Senator Michael Gianaris, and Assemblymembers Ron Kim and Brian Barnwell in replacing Con Ed with publicly owned power. (Max Parrott for QNS)

Amtrak has a new chief executive in William J. Flynn, the third in the last three years. Good luck. ((Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

RIP Joe Coulombe, Trader Joe. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

A moderate Democrat drops out of the race in hopes that it ives another moderate enough of the vote to beat the Democratic Socialist at the top of the ticket. No, this isn’t about Mayor Pete or Amy dropping out of the race in hopes of stopping Bernie, this is Fernando Cabrera dropping out of the race for 14th Congressional District against Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez in hopes that Michelle Caruso-Cabrera has a better chance. (David Cruz for Norwood News)

Residents in East New York are looking to Albany to declare a cease-and-desist zone for house flippers after reporting multiple phone calls and door knocks a day from people attempting to buy their homes unsolicited. (Allison Dikanovic for The City)

A Q&A with the new Interim President of New York City Transit, where Feinberg offers no good answer as to why she supports hiring 500 additional cops with no measure of success on the job would look like for them and at the same time cutting 700 operational positions to save money. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Free rent and getting paid to explore downtown Manhattan. Welcome to the Explorer-in Chief job. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Without visible enforcement, the rules get relaxed. That’s what’s happening in Sunset Park as truck drivers are deviating from the city’s legal through streets and getting stuck in attempts to make impossible turns. The NYPD issued 16 tickets for commercial vehicles on residential streets in all of Brooklyn in January. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Could this be the year the city takes decisive action to protect pedestrians against drivers? State Sen. Andrew Gounardes is sponsoring a package of bills at the state level aimed at making the city’s streets safer. You’d think the City Council would be leading the way on this, but I’m glad to see that someone is attempting to take action. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A carriage horse was euthanized shortly after she collapsed in Central Park on Saturday. The incident that lead to the horse’s death was captured on video. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio as yet to make good on his campaign promise from 2013, where he said he would ban horse carriages from Central Park on day one. A promise which earned him the support of animal rights activists over Christine Quinn in the Democratic primary. (Elizabeth Titus for Politico)

The Sergeants Benevolent Association and Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, two loudmouth organizations when it comes to bail reform, are suspiciously quiet when it comes to the case of narcotics officer Stephen Abreu, who was charged with attempted murder, criminal possession of a weapon and other charges. Awaiting a felony murder charge, he was released without bail. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Kudos to Streetsblog, who heard about the stupid campaign in Staten Island to tie yellow ribbons around phone poles to warn drivers of speed cameras, and decided to go to Staten Island to tie as many ribbons around as many poles as they could find in protest. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Mayor de Blasio ran for president and his campaign died. He endorsed Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden is seeing a resurgence. Now he’s taking his kiss of death home to Chirlane McCray in hopes that he can help make his wife the next Brooklyn borough president. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

Scarr’s Pizza is moving, but only down the street to a larger location on Orchard St. Get your slices now so you can talk down to people waiting on line for pizza at the new location. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Sometimes you can’t pass up a sign (or two in this case) declaring the best burger in New York City. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 new public art installations not to miss in March. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Thank you to reader Dylan for sending in today’s featured photo from outside the Brooklyn Museum of this Leon Karssen sticker.

The Briefly for February 16, 2020 – The “Peanut Butter Bandit Needs to Be Caught” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Bernie Sanders gets the Bill de Blasio kiss of death, the cutest thing in the city, a 500% rent increase in Coney Island, the Amazon killer, and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 48˚
Clear throughout the day.

What’s open and what’s closed on President’s Day. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Bernie Sanders campaign received the presidential kiss of death over the weekend: Bill de Blasio’s endorsement. De Blasio was, no doubt, looking for any excuse to leave NYC and jumped at the opportunity. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The subway is ubiquitious in the city, but at some point it needed to be built. The latest photo exhibition at the New York Transit Museum shows how the subway was built. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: For only $45 million, you can live like a Russian oligarch in the Plaza. The apartment used to be two separate apartments that were combined into one insane apartment covered in onyx and crystal. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Someone needs to stop the Peanut Butter Bandit. The worst person in the city hit the A train once more with the gooey atrocity on the poles of the train early Friday morning. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

He helped kill the Amazon HQ2 deal, and now he’s set his sights on making sure nothing like the Amazon deal ever happens again. Michael Gianaris wants to reform how the city gives tax breaks to giant companies. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

It’s like a normal store, but it only sells flutes. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

JFK’s Terminal 4 will be getting a $3.8 billion makeover. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

It’s 3:30 am on a Wednesday and you desperately want pierogis, where will you go? Behind the scenes at Veselka, the Ukrainian restaurant that’s been part of the East Village since the 50s. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Despite early reporting, Governor Cuomo and President Trump’s meeting about the ban on New Yorkers from the Truster Traveler Program and giving the government access to New York’s DMV records was “productive,” but no solution was reached. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Caroline Baumann didn’t resign as director of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum out of nowhere, she was forced out after an investigation into her wedding found she violated policy when it came to acquiring her dress and venue. The Smithsonian isn’t run by the government, but is partially funded by the government and has a similar conflict of interest policy. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

The ax is finally falling, all Barney’s stores will close at the end of the month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Only three restaurants in the city were closed last week by the Department of Health, but one of them is the city’s newest member of the 100+ point violation club. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The NYC condoms have a new wrapper, but here’s something that’s a little confusing: The name of the wrapper design is the “NYC Legend XL.” While it sounds like this is the magnum of free condoms, there’s no indication if this is for your average or not-so-average New Yorker (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man shot in the face by an ICE agent last week plans to sue the agency and is calling for an investigation of the incident. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Should the subway be free? According to City Councilmember Mark Treyger, the answer is yes. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Black Lives Matter President Anthony Beckford is the latest to stand up in support City Councimember Mark Treyger’s call to make transit free to use. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

He’s not alone. Meet the state’s assemblymember hopefuls who agree the fairest fare is no fare at all. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Meet Pancakes, the Staten Island Zoo’s brand newborn sloth, the cutest thing in the city. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The NYPD reportedly issued a subpoena to Twitter requesting access to the account of NY Post police bureau chief Tina Moore, citing the Patriot Act as their justification to try to find leaks within the department. The effort was lead by new police commissioner Dermot Shea. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s like a grocery store, but it’s an art installation where everything is made from plastic bags. The Plastic Bag Store, from Robin Frohardt, will be viewable in Times Square on March 1, coinciding with the state’s plastic bag ban. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A 14-year-old boy suspected of fatally stabbing a Tessa Majors to death in a Morningside Park robbery last December has been indicted on murder charges. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Rent increases are a part of life in the city, but a 500% rent increase is reprehensible. The Lola Star Gift Shop on the boardwalk in Coney Island faces a 500% increase in her rent from Luna Park and the company’s owner’s Zamperla. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

22 trendy restaurants you can still get into. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for Valentine’s Day, 2020 – The “Your Plant Stylist Appointment is Coming Up” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 12 places to smooch your Valentine, Bloomberg tries to distract from his record with memes, the 27 top burgers, Trump vs NY rolls on, and more

Today – Low: 18˚ High: 34˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 30˚ High: 47˚

12 places to smooch on Valentine’s Day. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

There have been no cases of coronavirus in New York City and despite this, the city’s Chinatowns are suffering. (Marina Fang for Huff Post)

A look forward on this frigid morning to the spring’s street festivals on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

For $2,000 someone will come to your home and style your plants. Welcome to the world of plant stylists. (Steven Kurutz for NY Times)

About half the adult population of the city, roughly 3.4 million people, spent one of the last few years living below the poverty line, according to a new report from the Robin Hood Foundation and Columbia University. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Ready for a cocktail crawl? Here’s how to get it done on Atlantic Avenue. (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Michael Bloomberg’s forceful push into meme culture is being lead by Mick Purzycki, who is the CEO of Jerry Media, famous for stealing content without crediting the original creators. Can the people who brought you the marketing for the Fyre Festival distract us enough from the negative headlines and quotes from Bloomberg’s past? (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Roses are red, Violets are blue, Unlike the F train, I'll be there for you

The mayor signed a bill this week that will extend government-funded health care to families of all municipal workers, not just firefighters and police, who died in the line of duty or from 9/11 related diseases. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The annual tradition continues: Phil Collins Day is on Saturday. (Kate Hooker for Brooklyn Based)

The moment the state announced the end of brokers’ fees, rents jumped up about 6% across the board. Now that the fees are gone, it’s unlikely we’ll see a 6% drop back down. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City Comptroller Scott String is calling for a Bill of Rights for NYC tenants to protect them from unscrupulous landlords. He has a proposal as well, including limiting security deposits to one month of rent, providing itemized statements of damage, a five-day gras period for late rent, requiring a court order for evictions, and much more. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

GZA played ‘Liquid Swords’ at the Blue Note Jazz Club in honor of the album’s 25th anniversary. (BrooklynVegan)

The top five potato dishes in the city, according to Robert Sietsema. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The governor is making a new push for legalizing compensated gestational surrogacy with a campaign called “Love Makes A Family.” New York is one of three states that hasn’t legalized the practice. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Real Estate Porn: Don Lemon is selling his Harlem condo. You can live like Don Lemon for only $1.75 million. The condo looks like a great place to get drunk on New Year’s Eve and make mistakes. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The story of a meander and 14 photos of central Park Slope. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

48 pictures of the beautiful Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Manhattan, we have to have a serious conversation. We know you’re not going to Brooklyn on the weekends, even if you need groceries and Brooklyn has the only Wegmans in the city. You want to veg out, binge the new season of Narcos and order some Seamless. That’s cool, because now Wegmans delivers to Manhattan. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

In a literal quid pro quo, the president said if New York stops suing the president, the president will restore New Yorkers’ access to Trusted Traveler Programs programs. This ban happened the day he was acquitted after being impeached. Letitia James has filed 35 lawsuits against the federal government since January 2019. (Xeni Jardin for BoingBoing)

A look into the illegal, but welcome, underground of street car washers. (Sandra E. Garcia and Stephen Speranza for NY Times)

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza came to a tentative agreement on a contract that gives increased pay and paid parental leave to principals and assistant principals. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Got furniture you want to get rid of but it’s too nice for the curb (note: nothing is too nice for @stoopingnyc)? Here’s where to sell used, vintage, and antique furniture in the city. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Bronx City Council Member Vanessa Gibson is going to pay $5,000 for abusing her position on City Council to get out of paying a $50 ticket for driving while using her phone. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A developer in Crown Heights was ordered to remove all construction equipment from the potential site of two 16-story towers after they were discovered violating a temporary restraining order. Activists have targeted the buildings as part of an anti-gentrification campaign lead by Movement to Protect the People. The group claimed the buildings would block sunlight for the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, but this has been refuted by the BBG and should not be confused with the 39-story tower that the BBG is actively campaigning against in its “Fight for Sunlight” campaign. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

27 top burgers in the city. (Eater)

Thank you to my valentine Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo.