The Briefly for July 3, 2020 – The “Hey Kid, Want To Buy A Baseball Team?” July 4th Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: July 4th subway and bus schedules, the St. James Place dance parties, the NYPD refuses to hand over bodycam footage, where to hang out by the water, & more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 90˚
Rain in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 72˚ High: 87˚

The Briefly turns two years old today!

Here is the MTA’s July 4th weekend beach subway and bus schedule. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

On the night of July 4th, we’ll be able to see a buck moon and a lunar eclipse. Don’t be so impressed with the buck moon part, all that means is that it’s the first full moon in July. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

RIP Free Slurpee Day 2020. (Fanni Frankl for amNewYork Metro)

Want to buy the Mets? You have until July 9 to place your bid. Can we start a Go FundMe? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Eight tips for dining outside right now at NYC restaurants. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

More than 20 streets closed to cars citywide will now be dedicated to outdoor dining starting this weekend and lasting every weekend through Labor Day. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

The High Line will reopen on July 16 with a limited capacity. (NY1)

New York City families will be able to keep their children home this fall and opt for a full remote school schedule regardless of medical need. 25% of students surveyed said they were “very” comfortable returning to school. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

Alternate side parking will be suspended from July 5 through the 12. The reason given is the pandemic and trying to keep people from making unnecessary trips. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNew York Metro)

Video: Exploring the origins of the St. James Place in Clinton Hill nightly 7 pm dance party. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New York is no longer on track to contain the coronavirus as infection numbers surge to record new highs across the country. At this rate, herd immunity is possible, but it will take years to set it. CT, MA, RI, and VT are on the list of states on the path to contain the virus. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

One of the big questions coming out of the pandemic is its effect on the city’s real estate and it looks like we’re starting to get hints of what’s to come. Median sales prices in Manhattan fell 17.7% compared to this time last year and the volume of sales dropped 54%. (Stefanos Chen and Sydney Franklin for NY Times)

Astoria’s Artopolis Bakery, Gussy’s Bar, and Monika’s Cafe-Bar are now among the 4% of the city’s restaurants and bars that have permanently closed since March. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Do NYC is attempting to compile a list of permanently closed bars and restaurants. (Do NYC)

By the time Governor Cuomo announced day camps could operate this summer and release safety guidelines for them, it was less than a month to their start date. Hundreds of applications for camps from the city rolled into Albany and there hasn’t been enough time for the Health Department to properly review them before being approved, so the summer started with over 225 camp applications sitting in limbo. (Reuven Blau for The City)

You can see the new exhibition Art on the Grid across the city on 500 bus shelters and 1,700 LinkNYC kiosks. The exhibit explores healing and loss, community and isolation, intimacy and solitude, and inclusivity and exclusivity. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times highlights the importance of the bike protests that have spring up around the city since Memorial Day weekend. (Troy Closson and Sean Piccoli for NY Times)

The Times, feeling optimistic, asks: Could New York finally become a bike city? (Sasha von Oldershausen for NY Times)

Photos: The city’s first day with open beaches. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Whitney Hu, a candidate looking to succeed Carlos Menchaca for City Council for District 38, the district at the center of the Industry City rezoning fight. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

The city will spend $80 million toward the reconstruction of 70 Mulberry St, which was destroyed by fire in January, including many items from the Museum of Chinese in America. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Looking to get married but don’t want to leave your car? Now you can get married in a drive-thru. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: Hundreds of people marched from Bay Ridge to the Barclays Center as a part of the international “Day of Rage” ªin opposition to Israel’s occupation and annexation of Palestine. (Meaghan McGoldrick, photos by Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A one-minute explanation of why some animals thrive in NYC and some flounder. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A first look at a proposed mixed-use development on the Astoria/Long Island City that will take up five blocks with twelve buildings that are being called “Innovation QNS,” which is an awful name. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

During the construction of a seawall to protect a train yard in Inwood from another Hurricane Sandy, the MTA unearthed a patrol torpedo boat from the Harlem River that was once commanded by John F. Kennedy. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

How many times have you ridden a subway to the end of a line? Exploring the end of the 2 line. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The problem with asking your employees for their feedback is that they know that you heard it. When WNYC’s newsroom was asked who should lead their daily news coverage them after the harassment and discrimination that plagued the newsroom was brought to light, the answer was clear: a person of color who understood New York, with experience in public radio. Their new boss? A white woman from California with no public radio experience. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

The state is rolling back some of its bail reforms, which took hold six months ago. More charges will be eligible for bail and more categories will be eligible for bail, which will result in more people being sent to jail, which has become an extremely dangerous place to be during the pandemic. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A Blue Lives Matter rally in the Bronx, as you might expect, quickly devolved into the participants screaming obscenities and threatening protesters. Yes, there is video. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says the City Council bowed to “mob rule” when it came to the city’s budget. Mayor de Blasio, never one to not put his foot in his mouth, defended Shea’s comments. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The NYPD has refused to hand over 1,137 requests for body camera footage, according to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, which has made investigating complaints “untenable.” It’s this kind of bullshit response for the NYPD, who refuses to take accountability for their actions, that brought us to this moment, where the public’s trust in them has eroded and created the NYPD-led violence during the George Floyd protests. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Making the case for a subway stop in Harlem to be named after Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, who collected one of the world’s largest libraries of African American books, prints, and artifacts and whose collection became the basis for the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library’s Division of Negro Literature, History, and Prints. (Wilfredo Florentino for Streetsblog)

17 outdoor bars and restaurants to hang out at by the water. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 26, 2020 – The “Welcome to Manhattan, $20 Please” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The CBGB Caucus, phase three could start on July 6, vendors return to Rockaway Beach, Harlem gets a Black Lives Matter street mural, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 74˚ High: 86˚

2020 is the year that everyone wants to start selling nutcrackers. (Margot Boyer-Dry for NY Times)

Without federal assistance, the MTA is leaving nothing in the table when it comes to attempting to make up for a combined $15 billion of lost revenue over two years. Already discussed are the disastrous combinations of non‐personnel expense reductions, reductions in force, fare and toll increases, service reductions, and “long‐term deficit financing.” (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

With the MTA’s trouble at the front of mind, let’s not forget that the city is waiting on federal approval for congestion pricing to enter Manhattan. A Cornell University study found that a $20 toll could reduce Manhattan’s traffic by 40%, greenhouse gas emission could be cut by 15%, and ridership on mass transit would increase by 6%. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA will rename two Brooklyn subway stops to include the name of Medgar Evers College, thanks to legislation from Assembly Member Diana Richardson and State Senator Zellnor Myrie. The new stops will be named Franklin Avenue-Medgar Evers College and President Street-Medgar Evers College. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

One of the hardest-hit industries during the pandemic is dog walkers. As life slowly edges towards normal and dog adoptions have spiked, can dog walker rebound? (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

City Councilmember Ritchie Torres has a sizable lead in the 15th Congressional District in the South Bronx. If that lead persists through the counting of absentee ballots, he could be the first out gay Afro-Latinx member of Congress. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The NYPD promoted three people of color to chief positions. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

David Afanador, the cop who allegedly put a man in an illegal chokehold in Queens days after it became illegal across the state, turned himself in and was charged with attempted aggravated strangulation and strangulation in the second degree. If convicted, he could face seven years in prison. (NY1)

Identifying 10 streets that would be ideal to close for outdoor dining. (Eater)

22 branches of the NYPL, QPL, and BPL will be opening on July 13 for grab-and-go service. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Grub Street floats an interesting idea: Should this be the end of the traditional menu? Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

We’re five days into phase two, which means the city is turning its eyes towards phase three, which includes basketball courts, dog runs, indoor restaurant service, nail salons, massage therapists, and other personal care services. The city is on pace to hit phase three on July 6. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

City Councilmembers Justin Brannan and Keith Powers have formed the “CBGB Caucus” as a way to help support independent music venues that remain closed and will remain closed through phase three, across the city. In a letter to the city’s Congressional Delegation, they outline support for a benefit for venues that have been completely unable to open due to the pandemic and emergency unemployment benefits for their workers. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The New-York Historical Society will, with approval from the city, be opening on August 14 with an outdoor exhibition called “Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine“. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

As stores slowly reopen, there’s a movement to preserve the protest art that adorned storefronts around SoHo. (NY1)

It’s less than reassuring to know that in the week of a primary, the NYC Board of Elections Director was fined for violating the city’s ethics law. The center of the violation is a hotel stay in 2018 that was paid for by Election Systems & Software while he was serving on their board, a company that the city purchases election machines and supplies from. He resigned from his position with ES&S later in 2018. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The local election to watch this fall will be Trump-supporting Republican challenger Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis trying to unseat Democratic incumbent Rep. Max Rose. Only a few days out from the primaries and both are on the attack. Rose called Malliotakis “a fraud who represents everything we hate about our politics.” (Rose Adams for amNewyork Metro)

Farewell to the Way Station, the Doctor Who-themed bar in Prospect Heights, who will not be regenerating after the pandemic. (Serena Dai for Eater)

10 chefs and restauranteurs discuss how they feel about reopening. (The Infatuation)

The New York City Council voted Thursday to legalize e-bikes and e-scooters for use on city streets, forcing the mayor to confront a reversal of his ill-conceived and poorly-executed crackdown of electric bikes. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Take a walk around the Rink at Rockefeller Center and it will become impossible to not see the 100 Pride flags flying around the plaza as a part of Rockefeller Center’s celebration of World Pride Day. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

If you can’t get out and do a socially-distant tour of LGBTQ+ landmarks across the city the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project and CyArk created a 3D virtual tour. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A look at Attorney General William Barr’s attempt to undermine New York’s federal prosecutors. (Benjamin Weiser, Ben Protess, Katie Benner and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

New York is releasing $65 million in federal money to help preschools and daycare centers reopen after the coronavirus forced many to close down. The preschools and daycares say it isn’t enough. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Harlem will be getting a Black Lives Matter street mural on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard between 125th and 127th Streets. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A look at the positive impact the city’s use of hotel rooms as homeless shelters can have. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

It won’t be happening this weekend, but along with lifeguards, food vendors are coming back to Rockaway Beach on July 1. (Alexander Jusdanis for Bedford + Bowery)

28 NYC restaurants with new outdoor dining. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chris for today’s photo of the new VBallentine mural in Crown Heights.

The Briefly for June 12, 2020 – The “Mr Mayor, Unlock This Playground” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The “blood in the streets” protest, the NYPD refuse to be interviewed online for the CCRB, a call to stop the Gowanus rezoning, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 83˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 58˚ High: 73˚

Has the pandemic and protests made you think about starting getting involved on a hyper-local level? Maybe you’ve thought about starting a neighborhood association? The Times breaks down how to do it. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Do you know the Muffin House? The Muffin House? The Muffin House. The roots of the nooks and crannies of Thomas’ English Muffins are in New York. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Governor Cuomo says that pools and playgrounds across the state can reopen. The city’s pools and playgrounds remain closed. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

In the 1970s, the NYPD’s unions distributed a flyer called “WELCOME TO FEAR CITY” meant to keep tourists out of New York City, teaching them how to survive with the city’s crime. A new version of “WELCOME TO FEAR CITY” has begun to be distributed, but with the twist of how to survive the police when protesting in New York. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The City has created a searchable memorial of nearly 1,000 New York City victims of Covid-19. Right now it only covers a little over 4% of the city’s victims, but they are working with journalism schools to expand the memorials one person at a time. (The City)

Governor Cuomo is deciding to use the political capital he earned on defending statues of Christopher Columbus, saying Columbus represents Italian-American pride. This argument seems to pop up more and more often, making me think it’s not a matter of if but when the statue of Columbus in Columbus Circle is taken down. (Zack Fink for NY1)

People are calling for Police Seargeant Terri Napolitano to be fired for sharing a racist message on Facebook which showed President Obama being lynched with Hillary Clinton next in line for hanging. The Office of Court Administration suspended her for 30 days without pay, took away her gun, and launched an investigation. Napolitano has since deleted her social media accounts. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

It shouldn’t be a surprise, but Manhattan’s rental vacancy rate is the highest it’s been in fourteen years. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

“Unless people are interfering with a Barclays Center event, or there are safety concerns, we would not take action to have someone removed from our plaza.” Unfortunately, the NYPD has had a different opinion about how people should use the plaza outside the Barclays Center. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Jahmel Leach is a teenager who was tasered in the face by the NYPD. After the NYPD tasered and arrested the minor, they never notified his family he was in custody because he was tall and they thought he was an adult. The mayor says he’s “really troubled” by what happened to Leach but hasn’t vowed any specific actions he’s going to take to get answers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

America has historically sought to arrest and prosecute its way through community issues that could be dealt with by understanding the history of this nation, our states & our community. Frustration comes from a lot of these things being ignored in impoverished communities: education, finances and health services. COVID-19 has exposed these inequities. So what will the city do beyond policing? We should build a comprehensive plan that addresses these shortfalls and provide the community with a say in how it defines the safety of its own neighborhoods.
– Taylonn Murphy Sr. for Gothamist, New York City Must Actually Invest In Black Communities—Right Now

How to celebrate Pride in quarantine. (Gabrielle Lenart for Brooklyn Based)

Phase one of reopening has begun, but there has been an uptick in Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations, which trails about two weeks behind New York City’s massive protests. We are still under the threshold for phase two. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Politicians in Queens are calling to make a 1.3 mile stretch of 34th Avenue in Jackson Heights permanently car-free. (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

Render Stetson-Shanahan was found guilty of manslaughter for brutally killing Carolyn Bush, at their apartment on Sept. 28, 2016. He avoided murder charges by testifying that he had a mental lapse. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

If you’ve wondered why there hasn’t been a leader to step up and speak for all of the city’s protesters, it because there isn’t one. The city isn’t being led by one voice, but by the voices of many. (Jan Ransom and Annie Correal for NY Times)

“The commissioner held a Twitter Q&A on Thursday morning, but took no questions.” Great job Commissioner Shea, great job. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The award for most questionable headline and lead image combination goes to “Gay Pride embraces its roots by teaming up with U.S. black activists” by amNewYork Metro.

Congressmembers Max Rose and Yvette D. Clarke along with Mayor de Blasio ar asking the military to rename General Lee Avenue in Brooklyn’s Fort Hamilton army base. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

The city will spend $3 million to helping 100 restaurants in the city forced to close by the novel coronavirus pandemic subsidize paying 1,000 furloughed or fired workers at $20 per hour for at least six weeks and serve 53,000 free meals to people in communities hardest hit by the virus. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

A dumpling automat is opening in the East Village, confusingly named Brooklyn Dumpling Shop. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The city will spend $3.65 million to give roughly 3,300 young people in paid 6 to 8-week online summer youth programs this year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

As a resident of New York City, I am writing to demand that a moratorium be placed on proceeding with the Gowanus Rezone Proposal, which incorporates parts of Boerum Hill, Park Slope, and Carroll Gardens, until the city’s needs can be reassesed. In the wake of COVID-19, with both the city and state budgets in crisis, the economy in free fall, and as many as 20% of Americans having lost their jobs—including a disproportionate number of people of color— this plan is woefully out of step with what the city needs right now, or what it can afford.
– Voice of Gowanus, Demand a Moratorium on the Gowanus Rezone

The Alliance for Quality Education and The Dignity in Schools Campaign NY today denounced the mayor’s comments and refusal to remove NYPD officers from public schools. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

The Yankees are distributing $50,000 in scholarships among five different college-bound seniors, at $10,000 apiece, with one student coming from each borough through The Stonewall Scholars initiative. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Demonstrations and protests continue into week three as protesters spilled red paint to represent “blood in the streets” on Thursday, symbolizing “the blood militant forces such as the police cause black people to shed.” It created a powerful image. (Debora Fougere for NY1)

How to calculate how much rent you can afford right now. (Localize.City)

1,109 Civilian Complaint Review Board investigations are awaiting police officer interviews, but the police union will not allow officers to be interviewed online. What bullshit. (Eileen Grench for The City)

Where to get a restaurant-made picnic spread in the city. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!