The Briefly for May 18, 2020 – The “Bored Enough to Give Yourself a Tattoo?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The entire city will take a huge financial hit in 2020, except the NYPD, the late-night delivery guide, the Williams Pipeline is dead, baby bears, and more

Today – Low: 55˚ High: 68˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, hitting only 3 of the 7 metrics necessary to start phase one of reopening.

There will be no city beaches open for Memorial Day weekend. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

As New York state is losing billions of dollars, politicians are turning their eyes towards a source of revenue they’ve failed to pull the trigger on for years: legal marijuana. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Watch Andean Bear cubs Brienne and Benny explore their habitat in the Queens Zoo for the first time. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

How bored are you at home? Are you ready to do your own stick and poke tattoo? (Dani Blum for NY Times)

Will the Covid-19 pandemic mean the end of the walk-in tattoo appointment? When the city’s tattoo shops reopen, there’s a chance. What will all the tattoo parlors do with their very clever Christopher Walken-related signs? (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The city’s park conservancies are expecting a massive financial hit this year, forcing them to drastically alter their organizations, including a reduction of over 350,000 hours of work, a half-million trees not being planted, an 80% reduction of park improvements, with up to a 68% loss of income in the worst case. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Governor Cuomo warned that without the HEROES Act, there would be devastating cuts to the budgets of education and medical programs, as well as local governments. (Robert Pzarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The NYC Ferry system is looking at a 20% reduction on top of the 30% reduction in service, with an intent to save the city up to $10 million. In addition, new ferry locations are being pushed back to 2021. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city is no different. The $10 billion shortfall will impact pretty much everything the city offers, like canceling the youth employment program, freezing new teacher hires, and killing environmental initiatives. As crime is at historic lows, the NYPD is not poised to take much of a financial hit at all, as de Blasio’s administration prioritizes policing its citizens over helping them. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This is the same NYPD that was incapable of enforcing social distancing without immediately reminding us all about its racist enforcement of stop-and-frisk as officers beat and pummeled people of color all across the city while glad-handing white people in parks. The NYPD has shown us the Peter Principle up close, as the mayor has reduced their role in enforcing social distancing because they can’t be trusted to treat all New Yorkers like people. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

This is the same NYPD that can’t be bothered to actually execute the city’s open streets plans while its people are desperate for space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The NYPD won’t even be fully in charge of the city’s plans to limit access to portions of parks to prevent overcrowding. A portion of the work will be going to the city’s 2,260 new “social distancing ambassadors.” (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewyork Metro)

Jadakiss donated 250 pizzas to medicals centers throughout in the Bronx, Harlem, and Yonkers as part of the Pizza vs. Pandemic initiative. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

The Times rides-along with the subway shutdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Photos from the inside of the 30th Street Men’s Shelter on First Avenue in Manhattan show people in close quarters sleeping on stairs and in hallways, proving the city is failing its population of homeless New Yorkers. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

The city’s response to the photos was to put more homeless New Yorkers into hotel rooms but has been pairing them up, which seems counterproductive if you’re trying to prevent the spread of Covid-19. The City Council is preparing a bill that would require hotel rooms used as an alternative to shelters to be single occupancy. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

WNYC and Gothamistreceived an $8.9 million Paycheck Protection Program loan from the federal government to help the $10 million deficit it was projecting, saving many journalism jobs. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

VICE, owned by Refinery29, announced its laying off 155 employees. There is local support to add financial support for digital media in the HEROES Act in Congress, but I can’t fathom a world where the Trump administration does anything to actually help journalists. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

An analysis puts the number of people who fled the city between Match and May at 420,000. In some neighborhoods like the Upper East Side, the West Village, SoHo, and Brooklyn Heights, the population has decreased by up to 40%. It should be no surprise that the more wealthy someone is, the most likely they were to abandon New York City. (Kevin Quealy for NY Times)

The New York Department of Environmental Conservation denied a permit necessary for the construction of the Williams Pipeline, essentially killing the fracked gas pipeline that would have terminated in the Rockaways and was at the center of National Grid’s refusal of service to new customers at the end of last year. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Someone is trying to plan a drive-in festival in “Yankee Stadium’s parking lot,” including live music, movies, games, etc. Take a moment and open up a map app or website and take a look at Yankee Stadium. Try to find “the parking lot.” Yankee Stadium doesn’t actually have a large parking lot. There are parking garages and a few dirt lots that double as parking when there are games, but there isn’t one large parking lot near the stadium like there is at Citi Field where you would think an elevated stage would let anyone see a performance. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Notify NYC sent out a mass text on Saturday saying there’s an “alarming shortage of donated blood.” The FDA amended its homophobic rule about not accepting blood donations from gay or bisexual men (but still won’t accept blood from a man who has had sexual contact with another man in the last three months) but the New York Blood Center says it can’t adopt those changes until June. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

The signs for Gem Spa came down over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

“You could feel it going through your veins and it was almost like someone injected you with straight-up fire.” The new syndrome linked to Covid-19 that is impacting kids sounds like actual hell. (Pan Belluck for NY Times)

New York children of color may be more vulnerable to the toxic shock-like syndrome linked to new coronavirus, according to demographic data released by City Hall. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city closed the field hospital at the Billie Jean King Tennis Center, which housed 79 patients, the last of whom left the hospital on Saturday. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

The late-night delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured flower photo from Grand Army Plaza in Central Park.

The Briefly for February 20, 2020 – The “A Diner by Any Other Name” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: “The Joy Goddess” of Harlem, the Lowline is dead, the best cocktail bars, Myles makes its NYC app debut, Lyft’s electric bikes are back and more

Today – Low: 22˚ High: 38˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

A look at A’Lelia Walker, daughter of Madam C.J. Walker, who 100 years ago in Harlem was given the nickname of “the Joy Goddess” by Langston Hughes, and whose parties and events provided a central location for the Harlem Renaissance. Part of a series by The Root focusing on little-known or forgotten rebels, celebrating Black History Month. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

Mayor Bloomberg started off his debate night getting ruined by Elizabeth Warren. The rest of the night didn’t go so great for him either. (John F. Harris for Politico)

A timeline of Michael Bloomberg’s support of stop and frisk. (Maggie Astor for NY Times)

The Lowline, once an extremely cool idea of putting a Highline style park in an abandoned trolley terminal in the Lower East Side, is dead. After more than a decade of work, the project is out of money. (Bowery Boogie)

Let’s grapple with an existential question for a moment: Is the Soho Diner really a diner? In Robert Sietsema’s review, he points towards no, with food choices pointing more towards “Top Chef” than “greasy spoon.” The desserts earned a compliment, but those are from Petee’s Pies and not made in house. Is a diner by name still a diner? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Myles is a new ride-hailing app available this week in NYC. The company claims rides will be 10% cheer than Lyft and Uber on average and they won’t make use of surge pricing. (Igor Bonifacic for Engadget)

Say hello to Eugene Hernandez, the new director of the New York Film Festival. (Sara Aridi for NY Times)

The MTA is betting $15 billion of its $51 billion 2020 – 2024 capital plan on the Trump Administration giving congestion pricing the go ahead and not delaying the 2021 rollout. If there is a delay or a call for an environmental impact study, congestion pricing won’t start on time and the MTA would likely have to borrow money, eventually leading to a transit financial disaster. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Lyft’s pedal-assisted electric bikes are finally back, after being pulled out of commission in April 2019 for malfunctioning brakes and batteries. (Tina Bellon for amNewYork Metro)

Chairnobyl? Chairnobyl. (EV Grieve)

NYC’s best under-the-radar museums, mapped. (Ameena Walker for Curbed)

This ain’t the piercing pagoda kiosk in the mall. A “hole new you” is ht promise of the new piercing studio Studs in Nolita. (Lindsay Tuchman for NY1)

The NYPD arrested a 14-year-old, the third and final suspect in the killing of 18-year-old Barnard College student Tessa Majors on Wednesday. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Take a look inside the ex-WeWork CEO’s three-story $27.5 million Gramercy Park apartment. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

John Ciero, a former NYPD officer, is among five people indicted in federal court for dealing meth and a date rape drug called GBL, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Southern District of New York announced on Wednesday. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York City’s first weed dummies are arriving in Queens. Of course, you need to have a prescription to get them for the moment. (Jacob Kaye for QNS)

Here are the new protected bike lanes coming to Manhattan this year. From the plan, it looks like you’ll finally be able to bike around the perimeter of Manhattan completely in 2021. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This story of a parrot who got loose in Manhattan, is frankly amazing. (Emily Flitter for NY Times)

Plush seating and carpets. That sounds like a good idea for the subways, right? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Citywide alternate side parking tickets will be increasing from $45 to $65 starting today. I used to live in Park Slope and my upstairs neighbor never moved his car for ASP because if he never moved his car and just paid the tickets once a week, he was still going to pay less than if he put his car in any garage in the neighborhood for the month. At $65, three tickets a month is still cheaper than any garage. (Kristen Torres for Sunnyside Post)

James Dolan has won more legal victories over former-Knicks star Charles Oakley than the actual Knicks have won championships over anyone. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The West Side Story revival has been met with protests, as demonstrators have been calling for Amar Ramasar’s removal from the cast because of his role in a photo-sharing scandal at City Ballet. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Chirlane McCray, Mayor de Blasio’s wife, launched a podcast called “Thrive with Chirlane McCray” on the Brooklyn Free Speech podcast network and we are all paying for it. The podcast is funded by Thrive NYC, which has received $850 million in taxpayer funds. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Do you know about “The Atlantic Ticket?” That’s a LIRR ticket that allows you to go from one of Brooklyn’s three stops to Jamaica, Hollis, Queens Village, Locust Manor, St. Albans, Laurelton or Rosedale for only $5. The success of this ticket is renewing calls that traveling within the city on the LIRR should cost $2.75. (Jose Martinez and Trone Dowd for The City)

Happy the elephant, who resides in the Bronx Zoo, does not have human-like rights and does not have to be transferred to a sanctuary. (NY1)

Believe it or not, there are people that live in the Financial District, and those people showed up in force to show their support against the creators of Sleep No More getting a liquor license at a Manhattan Community Board 1 licensing committee meeting. The new show is looking to set up shop in a mostly residential building. The NIMBYs voted against recommending a liquor license be granted and the proposal goes to a full vote of the community board next week, and the State Liquor Authority only uses community board votes as guidance, so it’s still possible the show moves forward as planned. (Ben Brachfield for Gothamist)

RIP Swamp Trump. We hardly knew ye. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYC’s top cocktail bars. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Eater)

thanks to reader Jacqueline for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 20, 2019 – The “Legal Marijuana is a Dead Cause in New York State” Edition

NY1 is hit with an age and gender discrimination lawsuit, the electric scooter and ebike bill passed, most Ricky’s locations are closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Port Authority’s plan to build an AirTrain to LaGuardia has one key flaw: the MTA. Comptroller Scott Stringer released a report that states the MTA simply isn’t ready, to no one’s surprise. (amNY)

It’ll be hard to go anywhere in the city towards the end of the month without spotting a rainbow flag. NYC & Co released a list of the buildings across all boroughs that will be lit with rainbows and their schedules. Some, like City Hall, will be lit from June 10 – 30, while some like Bloomberg’s Headquarters and MSG will be lit on June 30. (Curbed)

Five anchorwomen are suing NY1 for age and gender discrimination. The lawsuit betrays the image NY1 wants the city to believe. While Pat Kiernan’s 20th anniversary with the channel was celebrated on-air, while Roma Torre’s 25th anniversary was marked by nothing. Ms. Torre’s salary also happens to be half of Mr. Kiernan’s. (NY Times)

Legal marijuana is dead for this legislative session. According to Liz Krueger, the state senator who sponsored the bill, they “ran out of time.” (Gothamist)

The reimagining of Penn Station has begun with new entrances on 7th Ave. (Untapped Cities)

Did you know that subway elevator attendants still exist? The elevator ride at the St. Nicolas Ave station rides the same 181-foot route all night, non-stop. Gothamist rode shotgun for a full overnight shift. (Gothamist)

The Culinary Institute of America is starting an Anthony Bourdain scholarship. (Grub Street)

Following up on that “beach” Battery Park photo from earlier this week, meet Brian Shea, the master planner of Battery Park City. (Untapped Cities)

Ricky’s may be closing their NYC stores with the exception of two. Even the city’s innovator when it comes to wigs, hair dye, sex toys, makeup and more isn’t immune to the Amazon effect. (Jezebel)

17 tourist trap restaurants that are actually good. (Eater)

Get out into the world. That’s the advice from Wigstock founder Lady Bunny, who worries that the LGBTQ community is abandoning their safe spaces in favor of social media. (amNY)

10 essential tools every apartment should have. Time to hit your neighborhood hardware store. (StreetEasy)

Would it surprise you to learn that a confusing bar slash “>bar slash vegetarian restaurant was also a late night dance club is in Bushwick? (Gothamist)

If you met Giblet on the street in the East Village, you’d know. Giblet is a friendly, one-year-old pig that seems to melt everyone who sees it’s heart. (Bedford + Bowery)

Jennifer Lopez an Alex Rodriguez sold the apartment where A-Rod’s viral toilet photo was taken. They have since purchased blinds. (Curbed)

There were hundreds of summonses issued during the city’s crackdown on measles, but only one fine issued and that fine was the result of someone who skipped their hearing. (Gothamist)

The next artist to head for a Broadway residency is Regina Spektor. (amNY)

An argument for why Brooklynites should be voting for surrogate judges on June 25. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to Tuesday’s Queens DA election. (Gothamist)

Does any New Yorker not have nightmares about an air conditioner falling on them in the sidewalk? Even if there’s only one record of a falling air conditioner in the last five years, you should be following directions putting that thing in your window. (Patch)

The legislature passed a bill to remove the electric scooter and bike ban, but don’t celebrate just yet. The city still has to write its own rules and regulations before they’re completely legal to ride. (Mashable)

Once the police and Walmart show up to support your cause, can you still claim to be part of the counter-culture? The Pride March is often criticized for the priority given to corporations, the party atmosphere, and police involvement. This is where the Reclaim Pride Coalition’s Queer Liberation March steps in, promising an attitude similar to the original Pride March. The Queer Liberation March happens 9am on the day of the Pride March and has banned floats, corporate involvement, and asked for minimal NYPD involvement with no barricades to allow people to join and leave the protest at will. The Pride March bans anyone from spontaneously joining. (NY Times)

Okay, so you’re in Downtown Brooklyn and, honestly, it can be difficult to know what the hell there is to do around there outside of walk around. Here’s a guide of what to do and eat. (amNY)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.