The Briefly for April 2, 2020 – The “Is Governor Cuomo’s Nipple Pierced?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo shuts down playgrounds, a map of infections by zip code, Ina Garten makes an appropriately sized margarita, free coloring books, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚
Clear throughout the day.

Don’t ask AOC to make a TikTok. (@AOC)

Farmers’ markets are still happening across the city, but with stricter rules. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

The Right to Counsel NYC Coalition and Housing Justice for All have released a guide for tenants interesting in organizing a rent strike. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The NYS Bar Association and the state’s Unified Court System announced they partnered to create a network of pro bono lawyers willing to help out with the surge in legal matters that are expected to come out of the coronavirus pandemic and the likely economic fallout. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

One of the weirder things to come out of this whole pandemic will be the unanswered question “Is the governor’s nipple pierced?” No one is shaming the governor, I think we all need something to distract us from the state of the world for a few moments. (Jelisa Castrodale for Vice)

Sanra Lee, his ex-girlfriend, took to Instagram to talk about it and while she didn’t say they were pierced, she didn’t deny it either. (Charlie Nash for Mediaite)

Queens’ demographics may be the reason why it has become the epicenter of the city’s coronavirus outbreak. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

The city released hard numbers of positive COVID-19 cases per zip code, exposing the tale of two cities as wealthy neighborhoods have rates at 44%, while lower-income zip codes have infection rates as high as 77%. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Imagine you move into a 600-square-foot Manhattan shoebox apartment and two days later the two of you are locked down together. (Anne McCarthy for HuffPost)

“I basically want to address the idiots out there, and you know who you are.” Watch Larry David’s COVID-19 PSA. (Devon Ivie for Vulture)

Spring break is canceled for public schools. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“During a crisis, cocktail hour can be almost any hour.” -Ine Garten, hero. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Representatives Carolyn B. Maloney and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have added their voices to the cause of ending the ban on blood donations from gay and bisexual men. (LIC Post)

The New York City burger delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Video: Lower Manhattan’s skyline from 1903 through today. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

In the state’s budget, which passed on Wednesday night, is the legalization of electric bikes and scooters in the state, allowing municipalities to regulate electric bikes. Electric scooters that travel up to 15 miles per hour are legalized. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Also in the budget is a new state campaign finance system, with public matching money for candidates who choose to participate and lower individual contribution limits. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Say farewell to legal weed in 2020. The state failed to put it in the budget last year. A good lesson in not procrastinating. (Rebecca C. Lewis, Amanda Luz Hanning Santiago for City and State)

What New York City looked like, including a startling infographic about daily deaths, during the 1918 flu pandemic. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

You can now call 311 to report physical distancing violations. Of the 289 complaints in Manhattan in the first three days of the week, the NYPD “took action” on 88 of those complaints. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

A man in the Bronx attempted suicide-by-NYPD after receiving a COVID-19 diagnosis. After multiple warnings, the NYPD shot the man in the stomach and is in stable condition at NYC Health & Hospitals/Jacobi. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Former Police Commissioner James O’Neill is returning to public service to be a senior advisor in charge of distributing medical equipment and protective gear to city hospitals. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

210 of Coney Island Hospital’s 317 beds are full of COVID-19 patients and the facility is low on staff, gear, and space, as each employee is being issued one masks every five days. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Mayor de Blasio waivered on closing down the city’s playgrounds, Governor Cuomo did not. All playgrounds, swing sets, basketball courts, and similar spaces are closed. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Mayor de Blasio continues to be a punching bag in the media and doesn’t help himself when his public wavering constantly ends with Governor Cuomo making difficult, but right, decisions. This Times piece starts with an anecdote about Mayor de Blasio walking in Prospect Park on the morning of April 1, which means he was driven from the Upper West Side to Park Slope just to walk in Prospect Park when Central Park is one mile away. (Ben Smith for NY Times)

Love to color? Here are a few free coloring books from NYC artists. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 9, 2019 – The “Attack Rats Leaping From Trash Piles” Edition

Vision Zero is “working” with three deaths in two days, the Jeffrey Epstein case, visualizing your awful subway commute, ice cream in Bushwick, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

What do the city’s weed dealers think about Albany’s failure to legalize marijuana? Most of the ones Gothamist spoke to seemed to be behind the idea of legalization, even if it means changing their business. (Gothamist)

Get “disinfected” at The Museum of Booze. (Atlas Obscura)

We’ve got enough problems before we have to start dealing with rats leaping from the trash. (Patch)

Bastille Day is nearing, do you know how to celebrate? (Grub Street)

The Governor signed a bill into law that will allow the release of President Trump’s state tax returns. (NY Times)

A good way to get shot by an NYPD officer is yelling “Die!” while also yelling that you have a gun. (Patch)

A new tool from The New York Times will visualize how unpredictable your subway commute is so you can quantify your misery. (NY Times)

The Guggenheim Museum on the Upper East Side was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of eight Frank Lloyd Wright buildings that received the honor. (Curbed)

8 Frank Lloyd Wright houses in the city, mapped. (Curbed)

What you need to know about Wednesday’s ticker-tape parade for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team. (6sqft)

In a move that is both horrifying and also not surprising, the Department of Health let the Housing Authority appeal inspectors’ discovery of lead in apartments, leaving children exposed to lead in some cases for years. (Curbed)

For the second time in a month, someone set fire to one of the rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in the Bronx. The state’s hate crimes task force is investigating. (amNY)

What would the city look like if sea levels rose 100 feet? Mostly underwater according to this map. (Viewing NYC)

A day in the life of Váyalo Cocina’s Ana Fernandez, who came to the United States from Venezuela on vacation and stayed seeking asylum with her wife and sister. You can find Váyalo Cocina at Smorgasburg in Williamsburg on Saturdays (NY Times)

One week into Mayor de Blasio’s major enforcement action against vehicles blocking and parking in bike lanes. Let’s check in to see how it’s going on Second Ave. (Streetsblog)

In what seems like a test to everyone along the L line, the MTA announced that for 9 weeks of nights and weekends there will be no L train service between Lorimer St and Broadway Junction starting July 16 and ending October 4. (Greenpointers)

There’s a whole neighborhood between DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. 10 things to know about Vinegar Hill. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Inside the drama, comedy, and tragedy of producing theater outdoors across the city. (amNY)

The federal case against Jeffrey Epstein is centered on his Upper East Side Mansion, where prosecutors say he sexually abused dozens of underage girls in a yearslong sex-trafficking conspiracy. (Patch)

Epstein has pleaded not guilty. (Gothamist)

Inside Epstein’s Upper East Side Mansion, which is one of the largest private homes in Manhattan. (NY Times)

The NYPD plans to launch a peer counseling program later this year in an effort to improve cops’ access to mental-health resources after a string of four suicides in June. (Patch)

Take a video tour of MAD Magazine’s offices as the publication will cease printing new material this summer. (Gothamist)

A look inside the lawsuit the Cabán campaign filed, which highlights a lack of trust in the Board of Elections. (QNS)

The mayor still believes that Vision Zero is “working,” despite three people being killed by drivers in the last two days. (Gothamist)

The city is expanding its initiatives designed to encourage green rooftops after no landlord received a tax credit for it in 2018. (amNY)

8 ice cream spots in and around Bushwick. There are that many ice cream spots in and around Bushwick? Bushwick is whatever you want it to be. Maybe there are a million places to get ice cream in Bushwick and you’ve just never seen them all. (Bushwick)

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The Briefly for June 28, 2019 – The “These Could Be the Grossest Places in the City” Edition

Subway disruptions during WorldPride, LaGuardia’s Airtrain gets a $2 billion price tag, NYC declares a climate emergency, and more today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The MTA promised “full service” during WorldPride this weekend. That is, of course, mostly a lie and there are disruptions on 9 subway lines this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

The city’s 53 pools are officially open! (Time Out)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s influence in the Queens DA primary was invaluable to Tiffany Caban, and since AOC won her own primary that took her to Congress, she’s learned to master Washington DC’s game on her own terms. (Politico)

No matter how gross you think the city’s public restrooms are inside of parks, you’d be making an under-estimation. (Gothamist)

The real estate industry is planning on making a constitutional challenge to the state’s rent reform laws, arguing their fifth amendment rights were violated, in an attempt o shot the case to the Supreme Court as quickly as possible. (The Real Deal)

How does the city prioritize road improvements? Take a look at the two streets recently paved in Willets Point and you might find your answer. In preparation for a film shoot, the Department of Transportation rolled out the blacktop carpet. (Queens Crap)

The City Council joined over 600 other localities around the world in declaring a climate emergencytaken its place in the Manhattan County Courthouse, thanks to the Municipal Art Society of NYC’s “Adopt A Monument/Mural” program. (Untapped Cities)

An argument in favor of the peanut butter ice being the flavor of the city’s summer. (Grub Street)

A look at the state legislature’s failed attempt to legalize marijuana through the lens of the Cuomo Catch-22. Everything is too early to talk about until it’s too late to consider. (Gothamist)

The best friend chicken in the city is on Avenue C. The top 20 friend chicken spots in the city. (Grub Street)

A fourth NYPD officer committed suicide in the last month. (Patch)

The state is waiting on the governor’s signature on a bill that would require the makers of floss, tampons, pads, condoms, menstrual cups, and other similar products (floss really stands out as the outlier in that list, right?) to list the ingredients used similar to how it’s done with food in an attempt to force companies to reduce the number of toxic materials used in their products. (Gothamist)

After the demolition of its most historic structures, what does Red Hook’s future look like? (Curbed)

Seven people were arrested in a drug bust in Bushwick that was focused on heroin being sold near an elementary school and inside of the Bushwick Houses public housing development. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

All of NYC’s Congressional delegates are asking NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza to conduct lead-dust testing in public school buildings after a WNYC investigation found lead four schools. In addition, they asked for the results to be made public, and to have a plan to move students in schools where lead-dust is found. The mayor, instead of supporting their calls, is questioning the test WNYC employed. (Gothamist)

The Knuffle Bunny, a character created by Park Slope’s Mo Willems, will live in bronze statue form outside of the Brooklyn Public Library’s Park Slope branch. (amNY)

The New York Botanical Garden’s corpse flower started to open on Thursday at 2pm, so if you hurry you can still experience that “rotting meat in the sun” scent. (Gothamist)

Take a look at the designs of the LaGuardia Airport of the future that will bring it in line with “New York standards,” according to the governor. Hopefully, he’s referring to a different set of standards we have for the subways. (Gothamist)

The LaGuardia AirTrain’s cost was estimated at $450 million in 2014. In 2019? We’ve just arrived at $2.05 billion. (amNY)

The mayor stepped out of the debate in Miami and firmly planted his foot in his mouth when “accidentally” quoting Che Guevara. Now the entire country gets to feel what only city residents have felt. (NY Times)

If you’ve been outside Hook & Ladder 8 (Ghostbusters HQ), you’re seeing the remnants of Paul Rudd’s announcement that he’ll be in the next Ghostbusters movie. (Gothamist)

If you’re still stinging from being left out in the cold by MoviePass, the Alamo Drafthouse in Brooklyn is testing out a Season Pass at the cost between $20 or $30 a month. (BrooklynVegan)

There’s a small area of Bed Stuy that’s been plagued with a mysterious sound that’s been causing hangover-like headaches for more than a month. (Patch)

It’s so hot (how hot is it?) that the DOT was hosing down the Metropolitan Ave bridge because it wouldn’t close because of the heat. (Gothamist)

Video: Decoding the secret language of the city’s street signs, numbers, and letters. (Quartz)

Say hello to the baby peregrine falcons near the Bayonne Bridge who recently made their first flights. They have been given the World War II-themed names Rosie, Martha, And Juno. (Gothamist)

Google is trying to predict how crowded your subway, bus, or train will be. Even if they only ever displayed “very crowded,” it would be believable. (amNY)

A very specific list: Where to go when confronting your BFF about sleeping with your crush. (Eater)

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