The Briefly for August 28, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining, I Don’t Know Her” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A look at the state of bars and restaurants vs the SLA, where we stand with the start of NYC’s school year, great spots buffalo wings, & more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 86˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 65˚ High: 80˚

Try not to roll your eyes, but here’s the big “New York is dead. Here’s why” link. Try to prevent your eyes from rolling all the way out of your head when reading this dipshit’s thinly veiled “Why I’m Leaving New York” essay. (James Altucher)

“Listening to him go, “I used to play chess all day. I could meet people. I could start any type of business.” Wipe your tears, wipe your butt and pull it together. He says he knows people who have left New York for Maine, Vermont, Tennessee, Indiana. I have been to all of these places many, many, many times over many decades. And with all due respect and affection, Are .. You .. Kidding .. Me?!”
-Jerry Seinfeld, So You Think New York Is ‘Dead’ for NY Times

The city’s school will have the option to hold classes outdoors in yards, nearby streets, or parks. PTAs will be responsible for fundraising for supplies and equipment for schools to hold classes outdoors. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

“Chinatown is very traditional, almost to a fault, where we’ve let our elders take over. And we need to learn from our elders, but young people need to be making decisions now, and move Chinatown further. And seeing people like Patrick Mock start standing up and speaking out on the injustices we’ve suffered, it gives us a hope for the future.” -Conversations with politicians, business owners, and locals about the future of Chinatown. (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James asked a judge to order Eric Trump to testify in the state’s inquiry into possible fraud committed by the Trump Organization and President Trump. (William K. Rashbaum and Danny Hakim for NY Times)

NYPD officer Kyle Erickson has been twice accused of planting marijuana during traffic stops on Staten Island and despite bodycam footage to prove he did it, he was cleared of any wrongdoing. Just a sample of the 4,000 pages of documents released by the Staten Island District Attorney’s office about NYPD officers’ dishonesty and (lack) of discipline. (George Joseph and Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Restaurants have been closing, but not failing. An argument for why the distinction matters. (Talia Saxe for Eater)

A series of bars and restaurants sued the SLA this week to roll back their recent rule change that barred live music ticketed events, and other forms of outdoor entertainment. Disclosure: The lawsuit includes Littlefield, where I was hosting trivia all summer on Wednesdays. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

More than 20 state senators are calling on the State Liquor Authority to ease up on their restaurant and bar crackdown. Since mid-June, the SLA conducted over 41,000 checks, 165 businesses lost their liquor licenses temporarily, and 886 were charged with violations. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The City Council voted to extend the 20% commission cap on delivery fees for restaurants until 90 days after they are allowed to operate at full capacity with indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

And when will indoor dining return? The mayor says that depends on how our return to schools goes on September 10. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Although he also hinted that 2021 was a possibility for a return to indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

What’s the return to schools look like? A friend of mine who’s a teacher in the city told me they are getting ready to strike, but in the meantime the city has to inspect 1,700 public schools housed in 1,300 buildings by September 1 with plans to release a report on September 4. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Of the city’s 1,700 schools, 1,030 of them had some kind of documented problem with air supply or exhaust components. Chalkbeat compiled the most recent inspection reports publicly available for each school. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

An additional 30,000 students opted out of any in-person classes this year, bringing the total to 337,394 students that will not step inside a school this school year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Reopening day at the New York Aquarium. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

This Saturday is the reimagined Coney Island Mermaid Parade. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

This Sunday is the MTV Video Music Awards that Governor Cuomo announced back in June. MTV built a stage in Greenpoint instead of using the Barclay Center, citing that an outdoor event without an audience would be safer than an indoor one. Performers will be getting an exemption from the state’s 14-day mandatory quarantine. (Greenpointers)

According to the mayor, 20% of the city’s new Cobid-19 patients are linked to travelers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

US and UK authorities are discussing an “air bridge” exemption from quarantine for travel between New York and London. (Payton Potter for Patch)

With a filing for bankruptcy back in May, the future of the John Varvatos shop in the old home of CBGB might be in jeopardy. Which camp are you in when it comes to John Varvatos replacing CBGB? “At least it’s not a Duane Reade” or “Who cares, let it die?” (EV Grieve)

Revel’s electric mopeds relaunched with new safety protocols. Not sure how I feel about sending the company a selfie of me wearing one of their helmets. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Unmown lawns, unemptied garbage cans, and littered playgrounds. Welcome to the city’s parks when the city needs them the most. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

An engagement while canoeing on the Gowanus Canal: Doomed or beautiful? (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Do you know who makes the decision to return the subway back to 24/7 service? No, seriously, no one seems to know. The governor says to ask the MTA Chairman. The MTA Chairman says to ask the health commissioner. Can I declare the subways open 24/7 again? I hereby declare the subways open 24/7! Did it work? (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Photos: King Nyani, the city’s largest bronze gorilla statue, which can hold 2 or 3 people at once. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

Everything you need to know about living in a first-floor apartment. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Front-door boarding of city buses returns on Monday and so do fares on buses. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

The Mets and Marlins walked off the field after a moment of silence for 42 seconds with a Black Lives Matter t-shirt draped over home plate. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The assholes of the week are “The Illmore,” which has reportedly hosting secret indoor parties since June. The Illmore is, of course, in Bushwick. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Second place goes to Beavis and Butthead over here: Crime in NYC is near an all-time low, historically speaking, which is why former mayor Rudy Giuliani and current Police Benevolent Association president Pat Lynch were at the RNC calling crime in NYC a “public safety disaster.” Murders in NYC in 2019 were down about 50% from Rudy Giuliani’s last year in office. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Six great buffalo wings in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Helena for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for November 8, 2019 – The “The Subway Psychic and El Bloombito Returns!” Weekend Edition

A push to lift the street vendor cap, the end of the food hall gold rush, the pumpkin smasher arrested, the Rockefeller Center tree is on its way, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Just as your schedule is really getting busy, here comes a weekend of heavy subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Finding Keano, New York’s most elusive subway psychic. (NY Times)

Monday is Veterans Day, here is what will be closed as a result of either the holiday or the Fifth Avenue parade. (Patch)

The return of El Bloombito!!! (@ElBloombito)

Have you ever heard Mayor Bloomberg try to speak Spanish? Then you’ll understand why Rachel Figueroa-Levin’s Twitter parody account exists. (Salon)

Mayor Bloomberg’s possible announcement that he will be joining the Democratic presidential candidates can mean one thing. (Patch)

5 NYC buildings that changed American history. (NY Times)

There are an estimated 20,000 food and non-food street vendors in the city, but the number of permits has been capped at 5,100 since the 1980s. State Senator Jessica Ramos wants to bring the city’s rules about street vendors into the 21st century. Her bill would lift the cap but also enforce the rules and permitting on everyone and allow municipalities to decide where vendors could and couldn’t set up shop. (Gothamist)

Five reasons to lift the street vendor cap. (Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: Twelve bathrooms, an indoor pool, eleven thousand square feet, a glass elevator, six floors, a theater, glassed garage, and the former home of Lady Gaga. All yours for $18 million. (StreetEasy)

Going deep with Jacqueline Novak on the success and bringing her show ‘Get On Your Knees’ back to Off-Broadway. (Gothamist)

Bumper. Cars. On. Ice. (amNewYork)

Photos: Inside Flushing’s Hindu temple, completed in 1977, which possibly makes it the first in the country. (Gothamist)

Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Here is where you can see pieces of the wall in the city. (6sqft)

You can either go to FAO Schwarz, or you can book the $3,000/night suite at the Conrad New York Midtown, which is filled with FAO Schwarz toys where you can order toy room service and get a private shopping tour of the store. (6sqft)

Where to eat or order Thanksgiving dinner in NYC. (Grub Street)

The idiot who jumped into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo was arrested on Wednesday night. Myah Autry faces two charges of criminal trespass and turned herself in. (Patch)

If the Hot Duck has taught us anything, it’s that bird watching in the city is cool again. Photos of the hawks on Governors Island. (Laura Goggin Photography)

“Brutal” and “uncomfortable to watch.” Tina: The Tina Turner Musical is not getting the highest of praise. (amNewYork)

The Bay Ridge pumpkin smasher has been arrested. He was pulled over for a tail light and the NYPD allegedly also found cocaine in his car. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The National Transportation Safety Board issued a series of recommendations to increase bike safety in the US, but the only one people are focusing on is mandatory helmets. A mandatory helmet law would effectively kill all bike sharing programs in the city, but the mayor would rather tell all cyclists to wear helmets than fix the roads to make them safer for everyone. (Gothamist)

Earlier in the week I poked fun at how many food halls are opening across the city, but there are some early indicators that the “gold rush” over food halls is ending. (Eater)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is cut and on its way to the city. It should be arriving on a flatbed on Saturday. (Untapped New York)

10 NYC residential buildings with the best amenities for dogs. (6sqft)

The Met Gala theme for 2020 is conceptual at best and straight up confusing at worst. About Time: Fashion and Duration? Yup. (Gothamist)

The court battle over control of WBAI is ongoing but the station has returned local programming to the airwaves. (Patch)

The sudden appearance of an armored ICE vehicle on a residential street sparked panic in Ridgewood on Thursday. Turns out it wasn’t a random immigration arrest, but part of a federal investigation into someone hoarding about 50 guns including a machine gun, gun parts, and ammunition. (Gothamist)

Another dunk on Trump from Attorney General Letitia James and New York state. This time around the president was hit with a $2 million penalty for persistently using the Trump foundation for illegal activity. (Patch)

Take a look inside the last occupied apartments inside the Chelsea Hotel. (NY Times)

As winter creeps towards us every year, the same feeling of dread overcomes the city as it tightens its muscles in fear and anticipation. SantaCon is coming. Steer clear on December 14th. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s best diner breakfasts, according to the staff of the Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Photos: BRIC After Dark at the Knockdown Center. (The Briefly)