The Briefly for June 16, 2020 – The “4th of July Every Single Night” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD disbands a plainclothes unit, Soho’s street art, the mayor’s sick day, Governor Cuomo is ready to shut NYC down again, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 75˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Today’s the last day for you to apply for an absentee ballot.

A voter’s guide to some of the most hotly contested races on the NY ballot. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

What you need to know for the June 23 primary elections. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

What the hell is going on with all the fireworks lately? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Attorney General Letitia James is going to hold an online public hearing on Wednesday to investigate the NYPD’s actions during the protests that followed the murder of George Floyd. (Jacob Kaye for amNewYork Metro)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea has promised “greater transparency,” but it’s hard not to think of that as a joke when he announces that an officer was suspended without pay for spraying mace at a group of people during a protest in Manhattan on June 1. Which officer? No information. Which incident specifically? No information. Very transparent. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The NYPD is disbanding a unit of 600 plainclothes cops in precinct-level and Housing Bureau anti-crime teams. The NYPD will still have plainclothes cops in the Surveillance and Narcotics bureaus. Despite the announcement coming with the statement that it has “no reflection” on their work, the disbanded group represented 2% of the NYPD, but 31% of its fatal shootings. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Make NYPD discipline records public you cowards. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“Systemic racism is something that is learned. It’s learned over generations. We need to look at the narrative as it has been taught and revise it. And I feel that people are now starting to listen because it’s not just a black problem. If one part of your population is not good, it’s going to call to question what is it to be an American citizen? What is that? What is the real perk in that?” An interview with Detective Felicia Richards, president of the NYPD Guardians Association, a fraternal organization for black police officers. (Jami Floyd and Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

The state’s court system will undergo an independent review of its practices regarding institutional racism. The review will be overseen by a former U.S. secretary of Homeland Security and a general counsel for the Obama Administration’s Department of Defense. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Photos: Soho street art. (Josh Vogel for NYC Urbanism)

While the plans for the city’s 2020-2021 school year haven’t been publicly announced (I’ve heard it’s a limit of 10 people per classroom), there’s still a matter of what teachers will be healthy enough to return to the classrooms. According to the Department of Education estimates, up to 20% of teachers could be working remotely due to health concerns. (Reema Amin for ChalkBeat)

Short experiences from across the city from people who discovered their neighbors and neighborhoods during quarantine. (NY Times)

Where was the mayor on Monday? He was sick and at home. In his own words, “All New Yorkers should get a Covid-19 diagnostic test, whether or not they have symptoms or at increased risk.” Did he get a test? Of course now, and he has no plans to get one in the future. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Don’t make Cuomo turn this reopening around. There were over 25,000 reopening violation complaints to the state and it seems that Governor Cuomo is losing patience with Mayor de Blasio’s inability to enforce the rules, stating plainly “enforce the law or there will be state action.” (Erik Enquist for The Real Deal)

Raise your hand if you’re surprised that the MTA’s homeless outreach program was not a success. No one? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

12 restaurants that are selling frozen Chinese dumplings for home cooking. (Tony Lin for Eater)

Since 2013, there have been more than 25 million applications submitted for roughly 40,000 units in the city’s housing lottery. This week the city rolled out a new system for the lottery. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Airbnb is settling a lawsuit with the city by handing over data about hosts. It won’t be retroactive, but it will start once a new city ordinance is passed. The hope is to weed out illegal short-term rentals. (Christine Fisher for Engadget)

Monday’s LGBTQ SCOTUS decision has its roots in Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for GVSHP)

33 places to celebrate Black history in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Over 10,000 people took to the streets of Brooklyn on Sunday for “Brooklyn Liberation: An Action for Black Trans Lives.” The march came together after Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells and Riah Milton were killed within 24 hours of each other. Justice was also called for in the names of Tony McHale, Layleen Polanco, and Nina Pop. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

The photos from the Black Liberation rally are truly impressive. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Photos: Coney Island’s George Floyd protest. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The NYPD found no criminality after officers became sick Monday night from shakes they got at a Shake Shack in downtown Manhattan. I think the NYPD should have allowed Shake Shack to do their own investigation. (CBS News)

Tired of your traditional summer reading lists? Here’s a list of Nick Cave’s favorite books. (Erin Christie for BrooklynVegan)

A 14-year-old who pleaded guilty to robbing Tessa Majors in Morningside Park was sentenced in Manhattan Family Court on Monday to 18 months in a juvenile facility. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The NYC sandwich delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for January 23, 2019 – The “Cuomo Humiliates the MTA into Submission… Again” Edition

A car-less subway train design is coming, NY codifies abortion rights, the Queens DA election becomes competitive, the latest in subway perverts, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The subways will have a newly designed train in 2020 with new colors and an open gangway design so you can walk from the head of the train to the back. When there are no cars, every car is the fart car. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo’s campaign to humiliate the MTA is working. This time, he’s told the agency that he wants to see alternatives to a fare increase that would come in March. (NY Times)

The latest in subway perverts. (Daily News)

The Bryant Park fountain is frozen, welcome to real winter hours. (Time Out)

Queens will have its first competitive race for District Attorney in almost thirty years with the retirement of Richard Brown. (The Independent)

Governor Cuomo signed the Reproductive Health Act, codifying and expanding abortion rights like dropping most restrictions on abortions after 24 weeks, allowing midwives and nurse practitioners to perform abortions and ending criminal charges for harming children in the womb. (Politico)

The 10 healthiest neighborhoods in the city. (StreetEasy)

Does AOC give ‘zero fucks?’ “I actually didn’t say this, so while I know ‘brown women cursing’ drives clicks, maybe you accurately quote the whole exchange instead of manipulating people into thinking I said this sentence instead of just the word ‘zero.'” -Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC)

Three people have dropped out of the Public Advocate’s race due to technicalities, which leaves us with a pool of twenty candidates. (Bklyner)

Manhattan is getting two new food halls in the Financial District and Midtown West. (Eater)

The ACLU and NYCLU is suing the NYPD over the mistreatment of Linda Dominguez, a transgender woman, who they say was purposefully misgendered and mocked. The NYPD arrested her in non-standard pink handcuffs and left them on her overnight. (Advocate)

20 restaurants for a casual dinner with your parents. (The Infatuation)

The MTA and Amtrak have reached an agreement to add four newly proposed stations in the Bronx for Hunts Point, Parkchester, Morris Park and Co-op City. The stations would connect to Penn Station along the “Hell Gate Line.” (Welcome2TheBronx)

Four districts in Sunset Park are getting landmark consideration from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. Landmark status protects historic sites and buildings from being demolished or altered in a way that fundamentally changes their character. (6sqft)

A time-lapse showing the heartbeat of the city. (Myles Zhang)

The history, near destruction, and salvation of the cast-iron clock that stands over Manhattan Avenue in Greenpoint. (Greenpointers)

There are 370 participating restaurants in NYC Restaurant week, but only 11 have the distinction of earning a Michelin star. (Viewing NYC)

Two subway cars collided on the Williamsburg Bridge that killed one and injured fifty. It was the fourth collision in less than two years. This was the collision in June of 1995 that was the catalyst for the MTA to lower the speeds of subway trains until recently. (NY Times)

The Administration for Children’s Services is giving out free wearable baby blankets to help families keep infants warm and safe this winter. (amNY)

Coney Island is petitioning for a Trader Joe’s. Will Joe listen? After the L train shutdown was called off, anything is possible in 2019. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Skittles Commercial: The Musical” is a real thing at Town Hall written by Brian Eno and starring Michael C. Hall for a live Super Bowl musical commercial. Tickets (yes there are tickets) are $200 and the money raised is going towards Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. (Gothamist)

For $15 you can name a roach after your ex, or maybe a sweetheart who loves roaches, in time for Valentine’s Day at the Bronx Zoo. (Viewing NYC)

The mayor only signed 20% of the laws passed by city council. The remaining 80% became law when de Blasio didn’t sign or veto them within 30 days. His office claims that his schedule prevented him from signing the bills and we should not conflate his lack of time to sign a piece of paper with his lack of caring about doing his job. (amNY)

Could you live in a 200 square foot apartment? Take a tour of what has to be one of the city’s smallest homes. (Apartment Therapy)

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The Briefly for January 16, 2019 – The “A New Kind of Green Deal” Edition

Subway emergency exit alarms are coming back, the Star of the State address, the emergency L train shutdown meeting, the 23 New Yorkers running for Public Advocate, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

They take the local to Times Square, walk slow, don’t wait for everyone to get off the subway before getting on, and there was a record 65.2 million of them in 2018. The city’s tourism industry grew for the ninth year straight. (NY Times)

Live from the L train shutdown emergency meeting, it’s a blog! (Gothamist)

Watch the 2019 State of the State address. (CBS News)

An overview of the New York 2019-2020 state budget. (Democrat and Chronicle)

Five takeaways from the State of the State address. (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo’s $175.2 billion spending plan includes legal weed, congestion pricing, the removal of statute of limitations for rape, procurement reform and more. (Politico)

The state legislature voted to become the 15th state to ban gay conversion therapy. (Gothamist)

The governor is lobbying to pass legislation that would make it a felony to assault a journalist while they are on the job. (NY Post)

Find yourself some Netflix to binge on this weekend, because we’re in for a weekend full of shitty weather. If you’re ordering in, don’t be a dick and get that 30% or more tip ready. (Gothamist)

A useful list of restaurants that are extremely close to subway stops for when it’s too damn cold to go further than absolutely necessary. (The Infatuation)

The candidates for Public Advocate are in! Here are the 23 New Yorkers who want to become the next Public Advocate. (Bklyner)

An expert’s guide to renting a New York City apartment. (Curbed)

A third gender, X, is now available for IDNYC cards. (amNY)

What is going on here? No one roots for the landlords in Rent or Fox Books in You’ve Got Mail. Upper West Siders are petitioning to save a Starbucks from closing.(West Side Rag)

The alarms for subway emergency exits are coming back as the MTA continues to do anything except improve service to prevent subway fare evaders. (NY Post)

An early Valentine’s Day story: She attacked him with a samurai sword and left him to die, and he waited for her outside the courtroom as she went to trial. (NY Post)

Watch Babe Ruth and Lou Gerhig take batting practice from 1931 in restored 60fps footage. (guy jones on YouTube)

The sky is falling! Terra cotta tiles fell from the 7 train viaduct in Sunnyside, piercing a car’s windshield. (Sunnyside Post)

50 Jesuit priests were identified as having a history of sexual abuse over the last 60 years, who had assignments at the city’s best Catholic schools. (NY Times)

It’s official, New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand launched a presidential exploratory committee. (Politico)

8 things to know about Kirsten Gillibrand. (amNY)

A Department of Education mentor and founder of the student club “The Gladiators,” Malik Barr, was charged with molesting a 14-year-old boy in his apartment. Barr as been removed form the school. (NY Post)

Infighting, politics, and accusations have lead to two different women’s marches happening in Manhattan this Saturday. (NY Times)

The city’s most iconic buildings, mapped. (Curbed)

There will be no citizenship question on the 2020 census, thanks to a lawsuit led by the New York Immigration Coalition. (Politico)

One half James Bond and the other Art Deco. Say hello to the new bi-level bar, Dear Irving on Hudson. (Time Out)

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