The Briefly for May 23, 2019 – The “Who is the Super-villain Destroying Our Commutes?” Edition

Gentrifying neighborhoods belong to rats, the NYPD adds nearly 300 officers to the streets, everyone hates Bill De Blasio and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The story of a community response that saved Prospect Heights’ Ode to Babel bar from becoming a victim of the NIMBY-ism that comes with gentrification. (Grub Street)

It all started with the arrest of Michael Cohen. A look behind the scenes at the full year and 450 interviews from The New York Times‘ investigation into how taxi medallions ever became worth $1 million. (NY Times)

Who is the city’s supervillain pulling emergency brakes on subways and destroying our commutes? Whoever it is, they’ve been doing it for months, and possibly tears, without getting caught. (Jalopnik)

Here’s how the NYC Care Card works and what it does and does not entitle you to. (Norwood News)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is testing her political capital with an endorsement of Tiffany Cabán for Queens District Attorney, who also received endorsements from the Democratic Socialists of America, Real Justice PAC, and the Working Families Party. The primary is June 25. (NY Times)

Eight is great… unless that’s the percent of people polled who have a favorable opinion of you. Mayor de Blasio’s national favorability rating is below the president’s and the worst among anyone running for president. (Patch)

One thing that gentrification brings to a neighborhood? Rats. You may have read about the block in Prospect Heights where the rats have basically taken over, but it’s becoming a trend across the city. As more buildings have construction done, it displaces rats by destroying their burrows, forcing them to come to the surface. (NY Times)

A guide to the OMNY, which starts its slow takeover of MetroCards in 8 short days. (Curbed)

New York City is last on the list of popular destinations for retirees to live. About 15,000 seniors moved out of the city from 2016 to 2017. The top places are, unsurprisingly, Florida and Arizona. (Patch)

Video: Here’s how you can help to compost with food scrap drop-offs. (Viewing NYC)

A city council proposal to exempt yellow cabs from congestion pricing is short-sighted and foolish, according to experts. Politicians are blaming the fees for a declining number of rides and not a combination of continued congestion on the roads and app-based alternatives that make yellow cabs less desirable. (Streetsblog)

Don’t look now, but there are more vegan options in the city than ever and chefs are working to lure unsuspecting non-vegans to the dark side. Even fast food chains like Burger King and Taco Bell are getting onboard with plant-based options. (amNY)

The city’s news moves pretty fast. Blink and you’ll miss the rest of the story. What multiple people thought was a woman dressed as a character from “The Handmaid’s Tale” on the verge of committing suicide turned out to be a folded up red umbrella. (Gothamist)

Congrats to Washington Heights’ Maelyn Jarmon for winning season 16 of The Voice. (amNY)

Everything you need to know about raising chickens in NYC. (6sqft)

It’s time to take a look at President Trump’s tax returns. A bill passed the state’s legislature on Wednesday that would allow the state to hand the President’s state tax returns to Congress. The governor has voiced support in the past and is expected to sign the bill shortly. (Patch)

Google purchased another building in Chelsea to expand its footprint and keep on target to double the number of employees in its New York offices in the next ten years. (amNY)

The “LGBT in 2021” campaign is aimed at getting better LGBTQ representation into the City Council. (amNY)

All five borough presidents joined over 70 early childhood providers and Comptroller Scott Stringer in calling on the city to scrap its plans for pre-K and early childhood programs and start over saying the current plan would weaken the city’s social safety net and hinder community-based organizations to provide early education programming. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The “Summer All-Out” program will send almost 300 additional NYPD officers to high-crime areas in an attempt to reduce homicides and violent crimes. (amNY)

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The Briefly for May 15, 2019 – The “Carlos Danger Is At Large” Edition

A Queens city councilmember admits to sexual harassment and keeps his job, answering Broadway’s mysteries, Pride by the numbers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to Trump Tower, one of NYC’s least desirable luxury buildings. (Bloomberg)

The expanded Statue of Liberty museum is opening on Thursday featuring the original torch and other artifacts and exhibits highlighting the statue, island, and history. Only 20% of the people who step foot on the island visit the current museum. (amNY)

Amnesty International U.S.A. was set to sign a new lease at 88 Pine St until the new landlord said no. That landlord? The Chinese Government. (The Real Deal)

NYC Pride by the numbers on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots. (amNY)

Carlos Danger is at large after serving 18-months in prison for sexting with a minor. (NY Times)

Uh oh. This is the start of talk of a subway strike. (NY Times)

Six historic LGBTQ sites may become NYC landmarks. (6sqft)

The trial of NYPD’s Daniel Pantaleo, accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal choke, continued with Pantaleo’s lawyer blaming Eric Garner’s death on Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

Can a chef who’s earned a two-star Michelin rating change school lunches for the better? (NY Times)

A wine and artisanal food festival at Industry City was interrupted by anti-rezoning protest, specifically aimed at the commercialization of the industrial sector. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci is bringing his masterpiece St. Jerome Praying in the Wilderness to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Time Out)

Council Member Barry Grodenchik has resigned as chair of the Committee on Parks and Recreation after admitting to paying improper attention to a Council staff member, including blowing a kiss to her across a table at a meeting. Gross. (Politico)

Don’t worry, he is “deeply sorry,” and he will not be losing his job on the City Council. (Gothamist)

There was a worry that if New Jersey passed marijuana legalization that New York would have to follow quickly. New Jersey legalized electric bikes and scooters, maybe this will be the kick in the pants that New York finally needs? (Streetsblog)

Photos from inside the Whitney’s Biennial. If you make your way to the Whitney, expect protests against board member Warren Kanders, who has ties to a manufacturer of tear gas canisters used against asylum seekers at the US-Mexico border. (Gothamist)

Rockaway Beach will be fully open this summer after a $10.7 million renovation to prevent catastrophic erosion. 348,000 cubic yards of sand were added to the beach. (Curbed)

Meet Liz Thomas, the professional long-distance hiker who is about to set out on a 175-mile, 100+ park, five borough hike across NYC. (Patch)

If you’ve seen groups of people camping near Central Park for a week, it’s not a protest or a performance art piece or anything like that. BTS is coming to Summerstage. (Gothamist)

The best parks for outdoor grilling. (amNY)

Are Summer Fridays a New York thing, or does it exist everywhere? (StreetEasy)

Today is the first hearing for the proposed fur ban, which pits activists against the fur industry. If New York enacts the ban, it would be following in the footsteps of San Francisco and Los Angeles. (amNY)

Video: A tour of the most expensive neighborhood in New York City. Take a guess on what you think it is before clicking. (Eric Conover)

Congrats! NYC is one of the worst places in the country to try and start a career. (Patch)

Congratulations to City Councilmember-elect Farah Louis on her victory in the special election to fill the vacant 45th City Council district seat. Louis received 41.81% of the vote, which was enough to win. (Kings County Politics)

Answers to the six biggest questions asked on Broadway each night. (NY Times)

The Wednesday Walk: “A Saturday afternoon circuit for some fatty food, but also when you want to seem a little cultured” (GoRoam)

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The Briefly for May 10, 2019 – The “Harlem’s WWI War Heroes Who Who Brought Jazz to France” Edition

Closing the Kusher Loophole, OMNY is coming, the officer whose chokehold killed Eric Garner’s disciplinary trial is moving forward, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The subway diversions are minimal this weekend, but when the bar is already so low, it’s hard to get underneath it. (Subway Changes)

Here’s a crazy idea. Is the L train slowdown going okay? (Bklyner)

NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial in the death of Eric Garner will go forward, a New York State Supreme Court judge ruled Thursday. (880 WCBS)

Declawing your cat may soon be illegal. Manhattan Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal’s 2015 bill is gaining traction again thanks to the newly formed Domestic Animal Welfare Committee formed this year. The bill has the support of the Humane Society and Black Sabbath bassist Geezer Butler. (Politico)

The Harlem Hellfighters spent 191 days on the Front during World War I and in their time there, they helped introduce jazz to France and were some of the war’s most decorated soldiers. (6sqft)

It seems like the city shouldn’t have to deter people from parking on sidewalks, but here we are. City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is pushing to put traffic cameras specifically looking to catch drivers who block bike lanes and sidewalks as a part of Transportation Alternatives’ #TechforSafety campaign. (LIC Post)

Scrap the SHSAT test for the city’s elite high schools. That’s the message from Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network chapter in the city. (Politico)

The murder trial of the man accused of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz began with opening statements from the prosecution saying the murder was pre-meditated. (NY City Lens)

Some information about the OMNY system, the new system to replace MetroCards, and how they will work. They’re scheduled to be rolled out at the end of the month, but MetroCards will be around until 2023. (amNY)

The New York Aquarium has four new black-footed penguins, which are endangered. Of course, there are photos of baby penguins. (amNY)

Stop telling people things you heard at parties and actually learn about the city’s tap water. (StreetEasy)

The Soho Grifter was sentenced to 4-12 years, fined $24,000 and ordered to pay back $199,000. The only thing the fake German heiress will inherit is a prison jumpsuit. (NY Times)

The cheapest one-bedroom apartments in the city are, unsurprisingly, in far-flung neighborhoods, but who can argue with a one-bedroom for less than $1500? (Patch)

Here’s a quiz on what you can or can’t do on the subway. If you fail, you have to move to Hoboken. Sorry, those are just the rules. (Gothamist)

As it fights to contain the measles outbreak, the city’s attention is starting to turn towards schools with less than 90% vaccination rates, like the Brooklyn Waldorf School, which 24% of students are unvaccinated. (NY Times)

If you’ve never had the, uh, pleasure of driving in Manhattan, here’s a video to give you an idea of what it’s like. (Viewing NYC)

Here are the neighborhoods where it takes the NYPD the longest to respond to a 911 call. (Patch)

Where to pick up your picnic vittles near to the city park of your choice. (amNY)

Del Posto was named the best Italian restaurant in the nation by The Daily Meal. Eleven restaurants in the city made the top fifty. (Patch)

Take a look inside the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport one week before its opening day. (Curbed)

2019: After the Fall of New York. Imagine an 80s b-movie version of Children of Men, Escape From New York, Mad Max and Beneath the Planet of the Apes, but shittier and you’ll end up with this Italian movie. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s 17 new approved bills is aimed at closing the “Kushner loophole,” which allowed landlords to falsely claim the number of rent-regulated tenants in its buildings. (6sqft)

Shakespeare & Co is opening a bookstore in Brookfield Place in Battery Park, where Amazon just opened a new store. (amNY)

21 of the best LGBTQ bars in NYC to party at right now, depending on the time of day you read this. (amNY)

The mayor is calling the NYC Care card a “new health coverage option,” but it’s more of a public awareness campaign for pre-existed public services form the city. It’s a public awareness campaign that can improve public health, but the mayor is clearly misrepresenting it as health insurance because of his delusional idea that anyone wants to see him run for president. (Gothamist)

A mini-Smorgasburg is coming to Hudson Yards. Heaven forbid that people who live there have to go to Brooklyn for anything. (6sqft)

Rene Samaniego, an NYPD vice detective, admitted to participating in a prolific prostitution ring and gambling enterprise throughout Queens, Brooklyn and Nassau County. (QNS)

Chartwell Booksellers, the world’s only Winston Churchill bookstore, has been nearly hidden for 36 years on E 52nd St. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to rooftop bars and outdoor drinking in 2019. (Grub Street)

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