The Briefly for July 26, 2019 – The “A Green Wave is Declared” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, Katz declares victory in the Queens DA recount (Cabán does not concede), a $1k meal, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway disruptions are pretty rough. Rider beware. (Subway Weekender)

Breaking down the city’s “Green Wave” plan: 30 miles of protected bike lanes per year, heavier enforcement on trucks, better intersection design, the bike lane crackdown becomes permanent, and “outreach” to motorists. (Streetsblog)

Part of the problem is the NYPD, which blames cyclists after drivers hit and kill them with their cars. Here’s a video of two NYPD officers incorrectly stating that cyclists should dismount their bikes and walk when crossing certain intersections. For clarification, there is never a situation where a cyclist has to dismount their bike in order to cross an intersection. (Gothamist)

The protests worked. Warren B. Kanders resigned as a vice-chairman of the Whitney after protests singled him out after his tear-gas grenades were used against migrants at the U.S./Mexico border. This follows the museums refusing gifts from the Sackler family, the family of billionaire monsters who were behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

A look at lower Manhattan’s privately owned public spaces and the politics that are slowly turning them from actual public spaces to food halls and retail. (Curbed)

The world’s smallest cinema? The Hoxton Hotel has made a big claim about a tiny movie theater they’ve located inside their elevator vestibule. (Untapped Cities)

Heard about the DoorDash scandal but haven’t gotten the details? Here’s what you need to know about it. Also, if you have a favorite restaurant to order from, consider ordering from them directly to better patronize them. (Grub Street)

Amtrak says they’re on pace with their infrastructure upgrades at Penn Station to be completed by Labor Day, which means fewer disruptions for the Long Island Rail Road. (amNY)

A Lime electric bicycle caught fire after exploding in Rockaway Beach this week. This wasn’t a malfunction, according to the company someone tried to break the bike’s lock and instead punctured the battery, which lead to the malfunction. Yikes. (Curbed)

The city started a Residential Loading Zone Evaluation pilot program, removing parking spaces from certain neighborhoods to give delivery vehicles and for-hire vehicles a place to temporarily stop instead of double parking or parking in bike lanes, which is a nuisance to other drivers but has proven deadly to cyclists. (Streetsblog)

The history of the city’s first drag landmark: the Pyramid Club. (GVSHP)

If you thought this summer is hot, wait until the end of the century, when almost a full month of the year will be over 105 degrees without global intervention against climate change. (Patch)

On election night, it was Tiffany Cabán that declared victory and Melinda Katz that refused to concede. As the results of the recount are imminent, it’s Melinda Katz has declared victory and Tiffany Cabán has refused to concede. (amNY)

No matter the outcome of the Queens DA recount, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s reputation has taken a hit as a result of the campaign juxtaposing her point-of-view against the much more progressive Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

The election results won’t be certified until Tuesday, but sources put Katz’s lead over Caban at 60 votes. Next stop: court. (Politico)

Got a love of Korean food and a thousand dollars you don’t want? Atomix’s ten-course tasting meal with wine pairings will take care of you with a cost of $928 after taxes but before tip. (Eater)

The social and cultural Puerto Rican history of the East Village in the wake of the governor of Puerto Rico resigning. (6sqft)

A needed change could be coming to the city’s elections, but it has to be approved as a ballot measure for November’s elections. A look at that and the other ballot initiatives coming our way. (Patch)

This is what Manhattan’s first public beach will look like. (6sqft)

The mayor and city council are pushing for two weeks of paid vacation for every employee, small businesses are pushing back. (Gotham Gazette)

A threat of gentrification can cause stress in a neighborhood. The story of a Sean Price mural and a kosher restaurant in Crown Heights illustrates that story and that stress perfectly. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 6th Annual Macaulay Culkin Show Summer Comedy Festival at The Bell House is bringing something to the festival that has never happened before. Macaulay Culkin. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The men who poured water on NYPD officers are facing a tougher punishment than the man whose chokehold lead to Eric Garner’s death. Why? (NY Times)

The place that gave the world rainbow bagels was seized by the state’s tax department for not paying almost a million dollars in taxes. (Eater)

Some of the city’s private schools are joining with yeshivas to fight the state’s demands that their students be taught basic English, math, and science. (Gothamist)

Who hasn’t had the dream of finding an expensive work of art in a thrift shop? A drawing in a Queens thrift shop turns out to be from Austrian Expressionist Egon Schiele and worth over $200,000. (Patch)

Eating weeds? Yup. Meet the former corporate lawyer supplying the city’s top restaurant with weeds to be used in dishes in the city’s top restaurants. (Viewing NYC)

Diving into the 40-year history of the Chinatown Ice Cream Factory. (amNY)

The most exciting restaurant pop-ups to check out, some of them end their run this weekend. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Lillia for the photo of Hellgate Farms!

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The Briefly for July 2, 2019 – The “One of the Worst Run Big Cities in America!” Edition

The CBD ban is kind-of in effect, the 14th St busway lawsuit gets pushback, the best lunch spots in Midtown East, the Seamless controversy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Start putting your July 4th travel plans together, even if you’re not planning on leaving the city, because subways, streets, buses, and ferries will all be affected by holiday changes. (Curbed)

Congrats to presidential candidate and sometimes-in-NYC mayor Bill de Blasio. New York City is one of the worst run big cities in America! (Patch)

After the Shalimar Diner closed in November, a Facebook group called “Save the Shalimar Diner” wanted to… you know, save the Shalimar Diner. Cue 1986 Met Lenny Dykstra, who is (kind of) saving it by moving the whole thing to Long Island. (Untapped Cities)

Construction debris fell from the 12th story of a nearby apartment building still being finished through the roof of Mission Delores, the popular Park Slope bar, on Sunday, seriously injuring a woman who was in the bar. Mission Delores is closed until further notice and the woman who was struck is breathing with the assistance of a tube at Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. (Eater)

8 new outdoor art installations for July. (Untapped Cities)

Dante de Blasio wrote an op-ed in today’s USA Today about “the talk” his father had with him about dealing with the police that was mentioned in last week’s presidential primary debate. The head of the Police Benevolent Associaton called the mayor’s remarks “shameful.” (USA Today)

Eater wanted to know if L&B Spumoni Garden is still good. Turns out it is! (Eater)

The city is nearly doubling its monetary support for the LGBT community with funding for Trans Equity Programs, LGBT community services, and LGBT inclusive curriculums in public schools. (6sqft)

Here’s what you need to know about the Grub Hub/Seamless website buying controversy that erupted last week. Grub Hub has been finding new and creative ways to rip off local restaurants, including registering fake websites in their names and tricking customers. (Grub Street)

Playing ping-pong on the subway. Fun idea or public nuisance? (Gothamist)

The president doesn’t seem to know Letitia James’s name, but he certainly knows he thinks she’s being used by Governor Cuomo against him. (Patch)

The count of people who’ve died in car crashes while riding bicycles is up to 15 in 2019. 29-year-old Devra Freelander was hit and killed by a 70-year-old cement truck driver in Bushwick. (Streetsblog)

The number of dead bicyclists on city streets was 10 for all of 2018, the mayor says Vision Zero, which strives to “use every tool at its disposal to improve the safety of our streets,” will still be viewed as a success this year. (Gothamist)

The opposition to the 14th Street busway has some opposition of its own. An advocacy group supporting the busway slammed the lawsuit that blocked the busway from taking effect on July 1 as classist, citing the average rider of the M14 has an income of $28,455/year and are people of color. (amNY)

Reaching-Out in Bensonhurst is a food pantry that has provided food and social service referrals to people in need for 30 years but due to a shortage of funds has had to turn away hungry families. The shortage is due to stagnant funding. They currently serve 9,800 families and are always open to donations. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you have $13 million, you can own something almost no one in NYC has: your own set of private islands. (NY Times)

The city’s ban on CBD was promised at the beginning of the year for July 1. Now that it’s July, the Department of Health claims that it is cracking down, but they won’t issues fines until October 1. (amNY)

If you’re looking for the city’s biggest asshole, you wouldn’t be wrong to start looking at whoever decided to create this $250 hot dog. (Gothamist)

What does Midtown need? How about an 800-foot tall tower right on top of Macy’s? (NY Times)

The mayor will honor the late Det. Luis Alvarez, who recently died at 53 due to 9/11-related cancer, with a key to the city. (amNY)

A former high school student was awarded nearly $60 million in damages on Monday after a Manhattan jury found the city’s Department of Education and his former teacher liable for an accident that left much of his body scarred from third-degree burns. (NY Times)

A non-NIMBY argument against City Councilmember Brad Lander’s “YIMBY Junk.” (Red Hook Star-Revue)

The days of speeding without consequence in the city is coming to an end. The city is installing 2,000 speed cameras within a quarter mile of schools, which are practically everywhere. Anyone going 10 mph over the posted speed limit will get a $50 ticket. Critics say that turning the entire city into a speed trap won’t save lives, but anyone who gets a $50 ticket in the mail will start driving differently. (NY Times)

Where to get lunch in Midtown East. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 27, 2019 – The “If the City is One Big Mall, Are We All Mallrats?” Edition

Tiffany Cabán’s victory in Queens, The New Museum outlines its expansion, the MTA takes a dump on the morning commute and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Public defender Tiffany Cabán won the election for Queens DA, despite Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s unwillingness to concede for many hours. (amNY)

Tiffany Cabán’s victory, aided by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, was another failure of the Quens Democratic establishment as the borough continues to push even further to the left. (Politico)

Five things to know about Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

20 things Tiffany Cabán promised to do if elected as Queens DA, including declining to prosecute many non-violent crimes, change the charge standard for misdemeanors, hold the NYPD accountable, decriminalize marijuana, and more. (Gotham Gazette)

Councilwoman Farah Louis won her primary to all but secure the 45th District City Council seat, formerly held by Jumaane Williams. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York City isn’t becoming a mall. We’ve been in denial long enough, it’s time admit that New York City is a mall. All of the “retail hubs” like the ones at the World Trade Center, Essex Crossing, PIer 17, and the Hudson Yards? They’re all malls. (Curbed)

The 10 oldest churches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Those bus signs with the timers in them are great, except that 20% of them don’t work. (The City)

The Yankees are honoring the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots with a plaque in Monument Park. This isn’t the first non-Yankee plaque, with others honoring Nelson Mandela, the victims and rescue workers of 9/11, and popes Paul VI, John Paul II, and Benedict XVI. (Huff Post)

The Rent Guidelines Board approved rent increases of 1.5% for one-year leases and 2.5% for two-year leases for rent-stabilized apartments. (Gothamist)

19 fantastic LGBTQ bars in New York City. (Eater)

How to dress for a New York summer, from costume designer Luca Mosca, who happens to be John Wick’s tailor. (Gothamist)

Can you imagine the burden of always being right? There have been nearly 2,500 complaints of racial bias in the city since 2014 and the NYPD has not investigated a single one because the department hasn’t found anything wrong. (Gothamist)

The MTA Board is looking to ban repeat criminals from using the subway. Is it possible? “We can’t ban anyone right now and we won’t be able to.” Good thing the board is tackling the most important things first. (Patch)

The B, D, and F had awful mornings on Tuesday, with some trains sitting with closed doors for 45 minutes. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo, who says he doesn’t control the MTA, directed the MTA to create a task force to examine speed across the entire subway system, MetroNorth and the LIRR. (Politico)

40 years is a lot to do anything, which makes Peter Tsoumas’s run selling flowers at the First Ave L train station monumental. He has his first six months of retirement planned. After that, he’s open for suggestions. (Bedford + Bowery)

Step inside The Bureau of General Services — Queer Division, the bookstore on the second floor of The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Community Center on W 13th. (amNY)

A-Rod is slowly trying to become the A-Rod of NYC real estate with a plan to purchase multiple multi-family homes in the city. (6sqft)

Employment in Lower Manhattan has reached pre-9/11 levels for the first time since the attacks, according to the Alliance for Downtown New York. (Chelsea Now)

An updated list of what art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

The man who gave us I Heart NY was Milton Glaser, a New Yorker from the East Village. Another piece of work from Glaser is the murals of the Astor Place station. (GVSHP)

New York’s richest person shouldn’t surprise you. (Patch)

You’ll find Fredd E. “Tree” Sequoia behind the bar of the Stonewall Inn, the same man who was behind the bar on June 28, 1969. (amNY)

It’s been a years-long fight, but the Elizabeth Street Garden in Nolita will become affordable housing for seniors after approval from the city council. (Curbed)

Perry Rosen is one of Brooklyn’s last jukebox and pinball repairmen. (Viewing NYC)

Despite rejection by the community board and objection from Staten Island Borough President Jimmy Oddo, Staten Island’s Bay Street’s rezoning was approved by the city council, guaranteeing to change the neighborhood. (Curbed)

The Islanders will continue to split their home games between Long Island and the Barclays Center, being in the unique position to disappoint multiple crowds throughout the season. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The New Museum revealed its plans for its 2022 expansion. (EV Grieve)

With the state’s 2019 legislative session over, what’s next for Democrats in 2020? (Politico)

Where to Eat and Drink in Dumbo. (Eater)

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