The Briefly for August 6, 2020 – The “NYC is Horny for Books” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the mayor firing Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the MTA’s bad options to continue operating, where to eat in Queens, can you afford an apartment, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 81˚
Rain overnight.

Liquored up ice cream is now legal in New York. The new liquor ice cream can be alcoholic up to 5% by volume. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Photos and Video: Inside an abandoned Brooklyn warehouse and a look at the treasures left behind. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

In parts of the city, the fireworks stopped shortly after July 4. Apparently Norwood didn’t get the message because there was a 45-minute fireworks display over the weekend in a memorial for James Wimmer, who was a lifelong resident, on what would have been his 45th birthday. In 45 minutes, how many police showed up? Exactly zero. (Norwood News)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to know that he fired Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the city’s former health commissioner, and she did not resign in protest. Yes, it makes total sense to fire your top health official in the middle of a health crisis. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The city’s libraries’ grab-and-go service has proven one thing: New Yorkers are horny for reading. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Why did Mayor de Blasio push Dr. Oxiris Barbot out in the middle of a pandemic? He says he wants the “atmosphere of unity.” Nothing says unity like people quitting your administration in frustration and forcing out the top health official in the middle of a health emergency. That must also be why you keep around NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea, who shit talks in public. Bill, we all know you’re a simp for cops. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are six botanical gardens you can visit in the city this summer. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

A look through the archives of the Brooklyn Eagle at Irving Kaufman’s photography, with a focus this week on NYC construction in the 1930’s. (Phil Kaufman for Brooklyn Eagle)

RIP Pete Hamill, a celebrated NYC reporter whose work was featured in nearly any publication you can name. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

There were still nearly 100,000 customers without power after Tropical Storm Isaias on Wednesday night as ConEd reports it may take days to restore power across the city. Governor Cuomo directed the Department of Public Service to investigate ConEd’s response to the storm. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If you thought that the city’s bootleg bartenders selling drinks from coolers was going to dwindle in the pandemic, you’re wrong. (Avery Stone for Eater)

With Isaias fresh in mind and with repairs from Hurricane Sandy still going, it’s a good time to examine the loopholes that allow home sellers from disclosing if their home may flood or not. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Where to get takeout and delivery in Queens, updated for August. (Eater)

It’s like a “Why I’m leaving New York” personal essay, but it’s about a restaurant. Why the Banty Rooster is leaving New York. (Matthew Sedacca with Delores Tronco-DePierro and John DiPierro for Grub Street)

The city will be installing checkpoints to identify out-of-state travelers who are required to quarantine and handing out fines up to $10,000 for violations. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced firings of 79 employees, 181 furloughs, and 93 voluntary retirements. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

This is a good link to have when someone asks you if you think they can afford an apartment in NYC: What is a good rent-to-income ratio in NYC. I’ve always used the 40:1 rule, but this goes a bit deeper. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

“If you’ve never been to courts in New York City, even the newest buildings are teeming with people and their germs. Just to call a single case, there have to be at least 10 people in the room. One judge. One clerk. One court reporter. Four court officers. One prosecutor. One defense attorney. One person who stands accused of a crime and possibly their family members. So when OCA tells us that it will only have 10 cases on at once, that doesn’t mean just 10 people confined to one courtroom, but many, many more, all at risk of contracting and spreading the same virus that killed so many, including my colleague.”
-Martha Lineberger, public defender for the Legal Aid Society, Lives Hang in the Balance as Courts Resume In-Person Work for City Limits

Welcome to the first day after Governor Cuomo’s eviction moratorium is over. Without protections form the state, this could be the start of mass evictions and a huge jump in preventable homelessness in the city. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

NYC will dedicate a team of contact tracers to investigate coronavirus cases in schools, but based on the city’s contact tracing program so far (reminder: the NY Times called it a “disaster”), don’t get your hopes too high. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Go home, NY Times, you’re drunk. Headline: New York’s Sidewalk Prophets Are Heirs of the Lascaux Cave Artisans (Seph Rodney for NY Times)

According to RentHop’s rental report, rents dropped 5% year-over-year in Manhattan. (RentHop)

A rundown of all of the bad options the MTA has now that it seems clear that the federal government is not going to be helping and congestion pricing isn’t happening anytime soon. Reduced service with raised fares? Check. Signal upgrade delays? Check. Shelving new construction? Check. It’s like a Choose Your Own Adventure book, but every choice past page one is bad. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The best places to eat sushi outside” is a very 2020 headline. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 4, 2020 – The “Batten Down the Hatches!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The reason for the spike in shootings, Open Restaurants will continue next year, how to stay safe on mass transit, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

President Trump and his company are being investigated for possible bank and insurance fraud by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance. (William K. Rashbaum and Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is once again open to visitors. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

The city is getting ready for a storm surge of 1-2 feet during Tuesday’s expected downpour from Tropical Storm Isaias. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Eataly’s new summer rooftop restaurant, opening on August 7. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

According to an NYC Hospitality Alliance survey, only 17.2% of restaurants and bars say they’re able to pay 50% or more of their rent. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

One-third of the city’s small businesses may close forever, according to a report from the Partnership for New York City with job losses already at 520,000. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New York state is extending its unemployment insurance past the 26-week limit through the end of the year. (East New York News)

All about rent increases. When can it happen, how much can it be, and how to check if your apartment is stabilized. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

The NYPD’s 26th Precinct has a Twitter problem. The precinct is in the heart of Harlem and their Twitter account has a history of hitting the like button on tweets about conspiracy theories, QAnon, and Trump. After being caught, the account removed the likes. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Evergreen headline for the moment: “The NYPD is investigating shootings.” (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

The mayor has his own ideas, as does Commissioner Shea, but the data shows the reason for the city’s spike in shootings is a plummeting number of gun crime arrests. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

NYPD officer Richard Catapano was found dead in his Astoria apartment from an apparent suicide. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Enjoying Open Restaurants? They’ll be back next year, starting on June 1. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In addition to Open Restaurants returning next year, the city is making curbside dining permanent from June 1 to October 31. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Photos: See the 193 new Rockefeller Center flags designed by the public. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Photos: 22 new libraries opened this week to offer grab-and-go service. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Maintenance workers and security guards at Columbia University will not be going on strike after TWO Local 241 reached an agreement with the university. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

The most expensive area to live in the city during the first half of the year was the 10014 zip code, covering the West Village and Greenwich Village will set you back a median price of $4.2 million. Tribeca’s 10013 was in second place at $3.1 million. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk through Prospect Park from dog beach to Parkside Avenue. (ActionKid)

A Walgreen grows in Brooklyn. (Greenpointers)

A basket intended to prevent debris from falling off of elevated subway tracks onto pedestrians… fell onto a pedestrian on Sunday. An NYC Transit Interim SVP calling it “a very unfortunate incident.” The person hit was taken to the hospital and was reported to be in stable condition. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

If the city’s schools open, what is the city’s plan to get all 150,000 students who rely on buses to school? “The DOE is recommending that families, wherever possible, help reduce the number of students in need of busing by either transporting their children to school on their own, walking, or biking,” aka “you’re on your own.” Got it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Video: Drone footage of all eight Black Lives Matter murals in NYC. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist, video from @mingomatic)

Despite the city’s plans to reopen the schools for the fall, Governor Cuomo has yet to make a decision to allow any school in the state to reopen. He’s expected to announce a decision this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Shootings jumped 177% in July compared to last year, according to the NYPD. Assaults and reported rapes declined year-over-year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Black Lives Matter mural walls in Gowanus were defaced with the tired response of “All Lives Matter.” This is the wall that was accidentally painted over once, so I have confidence that this will be fixed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Photos and Video: The red-tailed hawks of Governors Island. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Tips on how to stay safer on mass transit. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Photos: What the hell is going on with the splashes of blood outside this meat market in Astoria? (Give Me Astoria)

Can you think of a good reason that Williamsburg has more trash cans than Bed Stuy? No, seriously, it’s not a setup to a joke. “Bed Stuy Strong, Safe and Sanitary” wants your input. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Meet Diana Florence, a candidate for Manhattan District Attorney and a former leader of the Construction Fraud Task Force within the DA’s office. She stepped down in January amid allegations that she withheld evidence. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

Facebook signed its 730,000 square foot lease in the Farley Post Office building. When will it move in? That’s a whole other story. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

A judge weighed in on some disputed ballots in NY-12’s Democratic congressional primary allowing some invalidated votes to be counted, but not enough to sway the primary away from incumbent Carolyn Maloney towards challenger Suraj Patel. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

15 summery brunch options for takeout and delivery. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 30, 2020 – The “The Summer Without Manhattan Blizzards” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD officers with the most misconduct allegations, where to takeout food in Brooklyn, Bluestockings’ last day, the plan to clean schools, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 91˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Maya Wiley is gearing up for a mayoral run for 2021. Wiley is a former de Blasio aide. Let’s not hold that against her. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Here’s a list of the current NYPD officers with the most substantiated misconduct complaints against them. Sitting at the top? Congrats to Michael Raso, the NYPD officer with the most substantiated misconduct complaints against him with 14 allegations in eight complaints. (George Joseph, Christopher Robbins, and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Farewell to Manhattan’s only Dairy Queen. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Mayor de Blasio says the Portland-style abduction/arrest of a teenage activist in the city’s streets is the “kind of thing we don’t want to see in this city.” No shit, Mr. Mayor. Are you in charge of anything? Why does it seem like the mayor and I both have the same authority when it comes to the NYPD? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“Tired of watching @NYCMayor once against declare that no one will be held accountable in the face of NYPD abuse/misconduct.” -City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer shares my frustration. The City Council is exploring legislation in response to the incident. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The NYPD is crying over the $1 million of damages to police vehicles sustained during recent protests. How does that compare to the damage and medical or legal bills of the people who they’ve injured or violated their rights? (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed an executive order on Tuesday requiring all city agencies to appoint a Chief Diversity Officer and use minority and women-owned businesses to procure goods and services valued up to $500,000 in an effort to help them survive the economic downturn caused by the novel coronavirus pandemic. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewyork Metro)

Columbia University is giving its professors a very unsubtle nudge towards teaching in-person classes this fall after a vast majority of professors elected to teach online when given a choice. (Annie Todd for Gothamist)

The Upper West Side and Murray Hill have both seen large drops in real estate prices since the beginning of the year. Even with a 32% drop in price, listings near Lincoln Center are still averaging $1,951,182 on average in July. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

How is the State Liquor Authority finding the time to investigate and send violations to so many restaurants and bars? The state is sending out emails asking workers to apply to be trained as investigators to log social-distancing violations. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Two customers assaulted employees of the Trader Joe’s in Murray Hill on July 14, after entering the store without masks and refusing orders to wear them. Even in a pandemic, there are still assholes everywhere. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Sander Saba, a nonbinary trans New Yorker, is suing to allow “X” gender on driver’s licenses, arguing that having “male” and “female” options exclusively on licenses violates nonbinary New Yorkers’ constitutional rights. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Map: Check out NYC’s 19,000 acres of natural park land. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

Two Harlem libraries, The Harry Belafonte Library and Countee Cullen Library, are set to reopen for grab-and-go service on August 3 this Monday. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city is boasting about how clean our schools will be when they reopen, but custodians aren’t so sure it’s possible with more staff and a hiring freeze remains in place. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Today is the last day Bluestockings is open in their Allen St location. (EV Grieve)

Quelle suprise! Neither side of the aisle likes Seth DuCharme, Attorney General Bill Barr’s pick for U.S. attorney in Brooklyn. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

Where to get takeout and delivery in Brooklyn right now. (Eater)