The Briefly for January 20, 2020 – The “You Trust the MTA, Right?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Martin Luther King’s address to Queens College, the de Blasio’s aren’t done with NYC, your ConEd bill will increase for years to come, and more

Today – Low: 21˚ High: 43˚
Possible drizzle in the morning.

“I still have faith in the future. However dark the night, however dreary the day, I still believe that we shall overcome.” -Martin Luther King Jr at his address to Queens College in 1965 as part of the John F. Kennedy Memorial Lectures. (Carlotta Mohamed for QNS)

Listen to clips from the May 13, 1965 address. (Queens College Civil Rights Archives)

Martin Luther King Jr, in his own words, on anti-Semitism. (Martin Luther King Jr in the Village Voice, 1967)

The neighborhood with the highest median prices in any neighborhood in the city is in Cobble Hill in Brooklyn. Prices increased 117% in a decade going from $1.15 million to $2.5 million. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The L train slowdown will finish with a $850 million budget below the initially announced budget by $75 million. If you want proof, you’ll just have to trust the MTA, because there has been no review and no public accounting for the cost savings. You trust the MTA, right? (Stephen Nessen and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The Upper West Side and water mains aren’t getting along this month. A water main broke at the corner of 102nd and Central Park West, causing havoc on traffic and the A, C, and D trains. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Our subways continue to fall apart. This time a piece of a wall along the F/G train fell onto the sidewalk below with no reported injuries. According to the MTA the wall is over a century old and they are now conducting inspections in the area. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The history of how Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia fought the mob by banning artichokes. (Mark Hay for Atlas Obscura)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency project may force the Lower East Side Ecology Center, a compost yard in East River Park that takes in eight tons of compost a week, to relocate to an MTA lot in East Harlem by April. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

How will New York defend itself against the horrors of the next Hurricane Sandy? It’s still up for debate, but one of five options being explored is a $119 billion seawall that would take 25 years to build and may not prevent flooding caused by rising sea levels. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Is Community Board 2’s wealth and political connections preventing Soho and Soho from being rezoned for the first time since the 70s? (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Renderings: A look at the future look of the Hudson Yards with 3 Hudson Boulevard. Spoiler: it’s another large glass building. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

Papyrus is closing all of its stores, including the dozen plus stores in Manhattan. Looking for cheap cute paper goods? They’re liquidating everything. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

12 hidden gems of Lincoln Square and Lincoln Center. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Will the Gowanus Canal ever be clean? Simple answer: no, and here’s why. (Joseph Alexiou for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mandatory helmet laws do two things: They reduce cycling and increase head injuries. (Jessica Roberts and Caron Whitaker for Streetsblog)

Homeless deaths in New York City are up 40% year over year. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

It’s a Broadway musical about emojis, and it’s a Times Critic’s Pick. (Laura Collins-Hughes for NY Times)

The landlord and two contractors in the East Village who installed an illegal gas line which lead to an explosion that killed two men, injured over a dozen, and destroyed two buildings, Maria Hrynenko, was sentenced to 4-12 years for manslaughter for their roles in the explosion. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza refused to answer the father of a teenager who was sexually assaulted at M.S. 158 in Bayside during an education town hall2 and eventually cut the town hall short and left without addressing the issue with the crowd. (Jenna Bagcal for amNewYork Metro)

Want to go out to eat for a good cause? Here are the NYC restaurants raising money for Australia. (Nikita Richardson or Grub Street)

After being called out for turning a “play street” cul-de-sac into a teacher’s parking lot at Park Slope’s M.S. 51, a Department of Education spokesperson said teachers would stop abusing their parking placards and no longer park there. That was a blatant lie. (Streetsblog)

Photos: Take a loo kinsinde The Sill’s first Brooklyn brick-and-mortar store in Cobble Hill. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

New Yorkers pay 35-40% more for electricity than the rest of the country, and expect what you pay to increase by over 4% each year for the next three years. The state approved rate hikes for ConEd. We really held them accountable for their service outages. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Trump administration is using a rape and murder as a way to condemn New York’s sanctuary city policy. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

A new law in New York City lets parents remove their obstetricians’ names if their medical licenses were revoked for misconduct. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

Evelyn Yang, whose husband is Democratic hopeful Andrew Yang, is one of 18 patients suing obstetrician Dr. Robert A Hadden for sexual abuse. In 2016, Manhattan DA CyVance’s office agreed to a plea deal with Hadden that involved no jail time for his crimes and reduced his sex-offender status to Level 1, keeping his name off online lists of offenders. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The husband of “Mob Wives” star Drita D’avanzo is facing federal charges after he and his wife were arrested on state weapons charges last month. So guess it’s not just a clever name for a TV show. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Ready for the next step in the war on cigarettes? The Tobacco Product Waste Reduction Act would ban the sale of single-use cigarette filters, virtually all cigarettes, framed as an anti-pollution measure. The bill was introduced in the state senate with three co-sponsors. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The de Blasio family is not done with New York City. Mayor de Blasio is reportedly pushing Chirlane McCray, his wife, to run for Brooklyn borough president. Supposedly the de Blasio’s would give an endorsement to Eric Adams for mayor in exchange for an endorsement of McCray for borough president. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Here’s what is known about the BQX‘s design. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

What else is there to do at the Brooklyn Navy Yard after you’ve shopped at Brooklyn’s new favorite supermarket? (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

There was once a rumor that John Wilkes Booth’s diary was hidden in an abandoned subway tunnel under Atlantic Avenue. While the diary hasn’t been found, you can find Le Boudoir, a speakeasy partially built inside the tunnel, through a secret door at Chez Moi. (Reina Gattuso for Atlas Obscura)

12 actually quiet restaurants to try. (Beth Landman for Eater)

The Briefly for December 5, 2019 – The “Fight of the Year: Duck vs Subway Car” Edition

In today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber’s top tourist destination, Parks takes over the city’s mass grave island, the Mets have a new owner, the best latkes in the city, and more.

The latest restaurant openings with potential. (The Infatuation)

Hart Island, the country’s largest taxpayer-funded mass-grave site, is now under the control of the Department of Parks instead of the Department of Corrections. New York City has been burying its veterans, its poor, its anonymous, and those infected in the early days of the AIDS crisis for over a century. The Department of Parks is tasked with providing access to the public for visitation of the million bodies buried on the 131 acre island. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Anthony Benedetto’s art is on display at the Art Students League. Maybe you know him as Tony Bennett. (Untapped New York)

In the fight of duck vs subway car, ducks win. A duck wandered on its way onto the tracks of the N train in Brooklyn, causing the train line to come to a complete stop while this terrible little scamp was removed. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The 10 neighborhoods to watch in real estate in 2020, with no real surprises. Williamsburg wouldn’t have made the cut if the L train had been shutdown, but it’s sitting at #1 instead. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Say hello to seven recipients of the 11th Annual Sloan Awards for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics in New York City Public High Schools. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: The tree lighting ceremony at Rockefeller Center. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

11-year-old Charlotte Nebres is making history as the first Black dancer cast in the leading role of Marie in the New York City Ballet’s production of “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker.” (Kimberley Richards for HuffPost)

The best latkes in the city. (Leah Koenig for Grub Street)

After months of negotiation and multiple threats of a transit strike, the MTA and Transport Workers Union Local 100 have reached an agreement. The details won’t be publicly available until after the contract is ratified by TWU 100 members. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Take a look inside Christina Hendricks’s apartment on W 56th. The 800 square foot apartment is on the market after her divorce to Geoffrey Arend. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The Mets have a new majority owner in billionaire Steve Cohen, who increased his investment by $2.6 billion. Cohen became a minority owner in 2008 after former majority owners the Wilpons were caught up in the Bernie Madoff scandal. Unfortunately for the Mets the Wilpons will stay on as CEO and COO for the next five years. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Watch videos from the final performance at Brooklyn Bazaar. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The best vegetarian restaurants on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

What to see, eat and drink near Brooklyn’s new Wegmans. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Despite its designation as a “public place” since 1974, architects and developers showed a plan to build nearly one thousand apartments on a 5.8 acre site on the corner of Smith St and Fifth St in Gowanus. Brad Lander, who has been excessively bullish on rezoning Gowanus and adding over 8,000 apartments to the small neighborhood, pushed the development at a Community Board meeting on Monday. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The story of the Taxi King, his rise to power and crash back to earth. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

One thing that won’t be returning to Lincoln Center after its half-billion dollar renovation is Richard Lippold’s 190-foot-long, 39-foot-high sculpture Orpheus and Apollo. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The top destination in the city for Uber trips by tourists in the city is as obvious as it gets: The Empire State Building. It was actually the #1 destination on the planet. The most popular place in the entire state was the Queens Center Mall in Elmhurst. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

Applications for middle and high school are due Friday, December 6. Here’s what you need to know. (Amy Zimmer and Christina Veiga for ChalkBeat)

The tragedy of the red horse hopper, told in three photos. (EV Grieve)

Why the census has always been controversial in New York City. (Diana Buds for Curbed)

The trailer for the fourth season of High Maintenance was released this week, with the show returning in early February. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Everyone could use a story with a happy ending. When Ashley Patrick left her purse with her wallet, headphones and a pair of gloves for her son on the Q train, she assumed they’d never find their way home. Let’s call this one a holiday miracle. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

NYC’s 11 most festive bars and restaurants. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

The Briefly for February 7, 2019 – The “Wait, What is a Pizza Sauna?” Edition

The Public Advocate debate, the porta-potty king, a rooftop glamping sauna, the NYPD targets Waze, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest.

Watch the full Public Advocate debate or read the live blog. (NY1)

Amazon HQ2 was the common punching bag during the debate. (NY Post)

At 115 years, Maspeth’s Grant Street Bridge is ready for a makeover. (QNS)

The MTA’s 24% accessibility at subway stations should be embarrassing enough before the truth comes out about how those numbers are inflated. The subways are planned to be fully accessible by 2034 at a cost of $40 to $60 billion. (Curbed)

The BQX is taking a baby step forward. The city’s Economic Development Corporation is expected to approve a contract that will allow an environmental review. It’s only the first step of a $2.73 billion plan, which is what you might call “one full Amazon.” (Curbed)

This profile of the porta-potty king of New York City is full of crappy puns. (NY Mag)

The best bagels in Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

“Yes, I broke your window because Barack Obama was talking to me and I didn’t like what he was saying.” A perfectly understandable excuse for breaking the window of a Harlem adult shop. (Gothamist)

Lincoln Center has a new president. Henry Timms, who helped create #GivingTuesday, will leave the 92nd Street Y to take the position. (NY Times)

Releasing a banner buoyed by balloons into Grand Central Terminal is a pretty good way to make sure your protest can’t be easily removed. (Gothamist)

Waze is about to get less useful thanks to an . (NY Post)

Google to the NYPD: No thanks. (amNY)

The city is getting a pizza sauna. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The BronxCare Health System will repay sexual assault patients for illegally billing them for rape exams after settling a lawsuit by the NYAG’s office. (amNY)

The state legislature is looking to raise the prison minimum wage to $3/hour. Inmates work six hours a day, five days a week between $0.10 to $1.14/hour. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Pizza sauna not your thing? You could spend time in a sauna while glamping on the roof of a Williamsburg hotel. (Time Out)

Ever wonder how the city’s greenmarkets continue to have fresh produce in the winter? Here’s your answer. (amNY)

Is anyone surprised that the state’s police unions oppose legalizing marijuana? (NY Post)

The Astoria Boulevard N/W station will close for nine months starting in March as elevators are installed. (TimesLedger)

A look at The Pirates, an enclave of fans of of F.C. St. Pauli, a German anti-fascist soccer team. (NY Times)

8 highlights from the new Museum of the Dog. (Untapped Cities)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.