The Briefly for April 2, 2019 – The “Most Expensive Toll Bridge in America is Not What You Think” Edition

Democrats are splintering over the state’s budget, the Pride March route, Harlem’s disappearing apartments, teens can’t legally vape, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Only 61.9% of New Yorkers participated in the 2010 census and to make sure more New Yorkers participate in 2020 the state cut the budget for the census in half. Oh wait, that doesn’t sound right. (Bklyner)

Nude sunrise yoga? Shockingly, we’re not talking about Bushwick. (LICTalk)

The “Clock Tower Buiding” in Tribeca needs a new name. The clock tower is being turned into a penthouse apartment. (Curbed)

The most expensive toll in America takes you to… Staten Island. (Patch)

Sorry, teens, no more vaping for you. In 120 days, the legal age to buy tobacco products, electronic cigarettes and liquid nicotine in New York will be raised from 18 to 21. (NY Post)

A disagreement over sick-leave will mean that the city’s fire engines may be left shorthanded, reducing some teams by 20%. (Patch)

The governor called the state budget the “greatest budget of the past decade,” but 17 Democrats in the state assembly voted against it because it was not progressive enough. (NY Times)

80% of the funds raised from congestion pricing will go towards MTA capital projects, with the remaining 20% being split between the LIRR and Metro North. (Curbed)

Today is one of six Equal Pay Days. (amNY)

Video: This is what the city’s war on electric bikes through the eyes of a Chinese delivery person. (Gothamist)

Rabbi Dovid Feldman is calling on City Councilmember Kalman Yeger to resign after his comment that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Brooklyn Paper)

Kalman Yeger has been removed from the City Council Committee on Immigration. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s new mansion tax will raise $365 million for the MTA. (6sqft)

No one is buying Mayor de Blasio’s claim to be reducing the city’s fleet of cars. (Streetblog)

AOC tweets, the NY Post has to write about it. (NY Post)

Congestion pricing may have passed, but the MTA is looking for technology solutions to implement it. (amNY)

David Blaine is the latest public figure to be under investigation from the NYPD for alleged sexual assault. (Gothamist)

Okay, so there was no legal weed in the state’s budget, but the governor is totally going to do it by June. (NY Post)

Watch: Can you tell the difference between New York pizza and a slice from a chain? (Viewing NYC)

Where to eat at Citi Field, where you can also find a baseball team playing sometimes. (Eater)

Harlem saw a decrease of 831 housing units despite an uptick in construction. Where are the apartments going? (Curbed)

The route for this year’s Pride March has been released, making a “U” starting at Madison Square Park heading down to the Stonewall Inn and coming back up 7th Ave to end at 23rd St. (The Villager)

If you’re on Roosevelt Island, avoid Octagon Field. Two dads and six kids were issued a summons for playing on the field. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Two former NYPD detectives who dodged rape convictions are asking a judge to ban the DNA evidence in that case from being used in the new one against them. (NY Post)

Hunts Point, the neighborhood that feeds NYC. (Streeteasy)

Michael Grimm, the current convicted felon and former member of Congress, is considering running for Congress again. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

21 ideal date-night restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 11, 2019 – The “Long On Promises, Short On Details” Edition

A closer look at the State of the City, “Rhode Island-style” pizza, election reform, UCB East is closing, a “bike mayor” for the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s scheduled subway service changes: The 5 is gonna be super slow, the 7, J and M trains are out between Queens and Manhattan, and that’s just the start of it. (6sqft)


Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2019 State of the City address highlights:

Watch the 2019 State of the City address given by Mayor Bill de Blasio

Five takeaways from the State of the City. (NY Times)

“Plenty of money in the city. It’s just in the wrong hands!” The mayor preached distribution of wealth, came up short on the details. (NY Times)

The speech was focused on equality, workers and tenants’ rights, and income inequality, to go “bigger, bolder, and aim higher.” (Politico)

The city’s free 3-K program will expand to districts 6, 8, 9, 19 and 32. (Bklyner)

Bus speeds should increase 25% by the end of 2020 from 7.44 to 9.03 mph. Some tactics will be adding between 10 and 15 miles of dedicated lanes, revamp five miles, and installing barriers to protect bus lanes from drivers. The NYPD will also add a team of tow truck drivers dedicated to clearing bus lanes. (amNY)

New and modified ferry routes: Staten Island will be connected to Battery Park and W 39th Street and a new Coney Island line will stop at Bay Ridge on its way to Wall Street. The Soundview, South Brooklyn and Astoria routes will be expanded. (Curbed)

The mayor created the Office of Tenant Protection, whose details were long on promises and short on details. The office will seize the buildings of the city’s “worst landlords,” which is an interesting phrase considering the worst landlord in the city was recently declared to be… the city. (The Real Deal & Curbed)

Free eyeglasses will be provided to kindergarteners or first graders need them starting next school year in a partnership with Warby Parker. (Chalkbeat)

While the mayor touted successes on old pledges like the styrofoam ban and a plan to divest the city’s pensions from fossil fuels, there was no plans for new green initiatives. (Politico)

Also missing? The NYCHA crisis. (Gotham Gazette)


Albany is looking to make some sense out of our state’s elections, limiting donations from LLCs, create early voting, combining election days, voting by affidavit, and pre-registering to vote at the age of 16. (Politico)

The modernist treasures of Queens. (Curbed)

A Bike Mayor? Transportation Alternatives has a petition looking to add the position to champion cycling across city agencies. Is it any more odd than a “Night Mayor?” (Streetsblog)

The average jail population in the city is at its lowest since 1980. (Daily News)

UCB will close their East Village theater on February 9 amid financial problems. Some shows will be moved to SubCulture. (Vulture)

LIRR will begin service to Grand Central Terminal by the end of 2022. (6sqft)

The secrets of the St. Marks historic district. (6sqft)

The most dangerous neighborhood to walk in Queens? Flushing. (Streetsblog)

Okay, what the hell is “Rhode Island-style” pizza? (Bedford + Bowery)

A teacher who was fired for allegedly forcing black students to lie on the floor while she stepped on their backs is planning on suing the city for one billion dollars. (NY Post)

The 15 most anticipated restaurant openings this winter. (Eater)

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The Briefly for October 18, 2018 – The “This Will Make the L Train Shutdown Look Easy” Edition

The MTA has not properly maintained the subways, NYC’s haunted history, the mayor is accused of selective animal-cruelty enforcement, this November’s election is going to be confusing, and more.

The L train is not running between Broadway Junction and 8th 8 Ave, from 10:45 pm until 5 a.m. every weekday until November 30. The MTA is also reducing service to one train every 12 minutes between Myrtyle-Wckoff and Rockaway Parkway from 11am to 3pm. Add that to the L not running at all on the weekends during October. Good lord. (Gothamist)

According to the Department of Transportation commissioner Polly Tottenberg, the challenge the impending BQE construction poses to the city “makes the L train look like a piece of cake.” Oh, cool.

15 ways to celebrate Halloween. (Untapped Cities)

Activists are accusing Mayor de Blasio of refusing to enforce animal-cruelty laws against Orthodox Jews who ritually slaughter tens of thousands of chickens Brooklyn streets ahead of Yom Kippur. The Alliance to End Chickens as Kaproros wants to show in court that the selective enforcement favors a particular class. (NY Post)

November 6’s election ballots will be two pages for the first time which is expected to cause multiple logistics issues at polling locations throughout the city. Uh oh. (Bklyner)

A sample election ballot.

Could one way to reduce the burden on the subway system be lowering the cost of in-city trips on the LIRR and Metro-North to subway fares? (Curbed)

LA chef Ilan Hall is back in NYC with Ramen Hood, a pop-up vegan noodle bar at the Chef’s Club in SoHo. (Gothamist)

Speaking of challenges Tottenberg also said “I’m the first to admit we have a long way to go.” when talking about parking placard abuse. She’s recommending automatic license plate readers, which likely won’t be a hit with civil liberties groups. (NY Post)

Three Crown Heights parks will see their first improvements in 20 to 30 years. It’s a double edged sword, as investments in these parks could result in higher rents and sale prices in the already fragile neighborhood. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Ferry buffs, sorry to see that Hurricane Michael forced a delay in the delivery of new boats for the Staten Island Ferry. The first boat was opting in late 2019 and there is no new delivery date yet. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is actually praising Mayor de Blasio. Cuomo is joining de Blasio in calling for a boycott of NY1 by any state officials over an ongoing strike by the electrical workers union. (NY Post)

A new audit of the MTA between 2015 and 2017 shows, surprise surprise, the MTA has not properly maintained the system. 76% of inspections are not completed on time and thousands of inspections never happened at all. (NY Post)

Low-level offenders (disorderly conduct, littering, drinking alcohol in public) with outstanding warrants have the opportunity to clear their record in Woodside on Saturday. (Sunnyside Post)

Trump Place at 200 Riverside Blvd will now be known as…200 Riverside Blvd. The building is the latest of many in Manhattan to dump Trump signage due to the actions of our current president. (NY Times)

The former NYPD detective on the Harvey Weinstein case allegedly told one of his victims that she could delete text messages from her phones before turning them over to prosecutors. She didn’t, but that sounds shady to say the least. (Gothamist)

The baby Trump balloon is making its way to the city for the Impeachment Parade on October 27. (amNY)

10 spots that will reveal the city’s haunted history. (6sqft)


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