The Briefly for June 7, 2019 – The “It’s Better to Work at the MTA Than to Ride It” Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, a Burger King sells fake vegan Whoppers, the world’s largest hot dog, the youths organized, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway work is relatively light thanks to the Puerto Rican Parade, but that doesn’t mean the city is without disruption. (Subway Weekender)

Simply put, this weekend’s weather looks great. (amNY)

This weekend’s forecast might give you a chance to see Jupiter in the sky. It’s close enough to earth to see it with a pair of binoculars, or at one of the multiple events put on by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York. (amNY)

The MTA installed a new time clock at an LIRR station in Queens in order to cut down on the excessive overtime which caused recent controversy, and surprise surprise, it’s already been broken. (Gothamist)

Somehow the MTA made the list of the state’s best employers. (Patch)

Drag Queen Story Hour has remained 100% awesome, but every now and then some jackass comes along trying to put a stop to it. Why should this month be any different just because it’s Pride? (Gothamist)

Does the mayor understand the story of ‘Jekyll & Hyde?’ If the mayor spent any time in the city, he might want to go to the NYPL and read a book or two. (Patch)

A community board district manager in Brooklyn secretly gave himself a raise for the three years in a row by digitally forging the signatures of the board’s chairperson. Between this and the community board district manager who bought himself an SUV, what the hell is going on with Brooklyn’s community boards? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Brazilian street artist Kobra has 18 murals across the city as part of their “Colors for Freedom” series. Here’s where you can find them all, or just look at photos of them if you’re not feeling adventurous. (Untapped Cities)

With the city on the edge of banning fur, seems like a good time to look back at the history of New York’s fur trade. (6sqft)

A Burger King in Williamsburg has been selling the Impossible Whopper on Seamless, the all-plant Whopper, with one problem. They’re selling normal beef Whoppers. (Eater)

It looks like the mayor and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand are qualifying for the Democratic Presidential Debate later this month. (Politico)

Governor Cuomo supports the giving drivers’ licenses to undocumented New Yorkers, but his longtime ally Jay Jacobs (from Long Island, of course) is calling Democrats trying to kill support for the bill. (Gothamist)

Forget all other sports New York is a Musical Chairs city now. (Deadspin)

50 years after the fact, NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill has apologized for the NYPD’s role in the Stonewall Riots. (NY Times)

Turns out trying to actually spending time with an art masterpiece is harder than you’d think. (NY Times)

This weekend’s the Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park, so grab the transit nerd in your life. It’s like Comic-Con for buses! (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re trolling for the world’s largest weiner, it’ll be at Ulysses Restaurant on the 26th as Feltman’s (the original Coney Island hot dog) is bringing a 120 pound of frank and a five foot two inch bun in support of the Headstrong Project. (Coney Island Blog)

An analysis from the Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform shows that neighborhood jails don’t hurt crime rates or property values. (Patch)

The body of Joseph Calabrese, an NYPD detective, was found by Plumb Beach, just off the Belt Parkway. This was the second apparent NYPD suicide this week. (NY Times)

Tom Brady can go to hell for multiple reasons, but this time it’s because he is attempting to trademark “Tom Terrific,” which is, of course, the nickname of New York Met Tom Seaver. (Patch)

“Why are people on bikes in the city so angry?” Maybe because of psychopaths like this who regularly attempt to run them over. (Gothamist)

Youth, who normally spend their time terrifying adult subway goers with their fun-having, organized in City Hall Park to protest the city’s slow approach to integrating public high schools. (amNY)

With a city as old as New York, you’re bound to find a few surprises when you start to dig. For a parking lot near the South Street Seaport, surprise turned to concern when discovering a thermometer factory from the nineteenth century, which contains elemental mercury, the type that becomes airborne and can cause brain damage upon inhalation. (NY Times)

The best first date spots in the city. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for April 2, 2019 – The “Most Expensive Toll Bridge in America is Not What You Think” Edition

Democrats are splintering over the state’s budget, the Pride March route, Harlem’s disappearing apartments, teens can’t legally vape, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Only 61.9% of New Yorkers participated in the 2010 census and to make sure more New Yorkers participate in 2020 the state cut the budget for the census in half. Oh wait, that doesn’t sound right. (Bklyner)

Nude sunrise yoga? Shockingly, we’re not talking about Bushwick. (LICTalk)

The “Clock Tower Buiding” in Tribeca needs a new name. The clock tower is being turned into a penthouse apartment. (Curbed)

The most expensive toll in America takes you to… Staten Island. (Patch)

Sorry, teens, no more vaping for you. In 120 days, the legal age to buy tobacco products, electronic cigarettes and liquid nicotine in New York will be raised from 18 to 21. (NY Post)

A disagreement over sick-leave will mean that the city’s fire engines may be left shorthanded, reducing some teams by 20%. (Patch)

The governor called the state budget the “greatest budget of the past decade,” but 17 Democrats in the state assembly voted against it because it was not progressive enough. (NY Times)

80% of the funds raised from congestion pricing will go towards MTA capital projects, with the remaining 20% being split between the LIRR and Metro North. (Curbed)

Today is one of six Equal Pay Days. (amNY)

Video: This is what the city’s war on electric bikes through the eyes of a Chinese delivery person. (Gothamist)

Rabbi Dovid Feldman is calling on City Councilmember Kalman Yeger to resign after his comment that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Brooklyn Paper)

Kalman Yeger has been removed from the City Council Committee on Immigration. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s new mansion tax will raise $365 million for the MTA. (6sqft)

No one is buying Mayor de Blasio’s claim to be reducing the city’s fleet of cars. (Streetblog)

AOC tweets, the NY Post has to write about it. (NY Post)

Congestion pricing may have passed, but the MTA is looking for technology solutions to implement it. (amNY)

David Blaine is the latest public figure to be under investigation from the NYPD for alleged sexual assault. (Gothamist)

Okay, so there was no legal weed in the state’s budget, but the governor is totally going to do it by June. (NY Post)

Watch: Can you tell the difference between New York pizza and a slice from a chain? (Viewing NYC)

Where to eat at Citi Field, where you can also find a baseball team playing sometimes. (Eater)

Harlem saw a decrease of 831 housing units despite an uptick in construction. Where are the apartments going? (Curbed)

The route for this year’s Pride March has been released, making a “U” starting at Madison Square Park heading down to the Stonewall Inn and coming back up 7th Ave to end at 23rd St. (The Villager)

If you’re on Roosevelt Island, avoid Octagon Field. Two dads and six kids were issued a summons for playing on the field. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Two former NYPD detectives who dodged rape convictions are asking a judge to ban the DNA evidence in that case from being used in the new one against them. (NY Post)

Hunts Point, the neighborhood that feeds NYC. (Streeteasy)

Michael Grimm, the current convicted felon and former member of Congress, is considering running for Congress again. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

21 ideal date-night restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 11, 2019 – The “Long On Promises, Short On Details” Edition

A closer look at the State of the City, “Rhode Island-style” pizza, election reform, UCB East is closing, a “bike mayor” for the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s scheduled subway service changes: The 5 is gonna be super slow, the 7, J and M trains are out between Queens and Manhattan, and that’s just the start of it. (6sqft)


Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2019 State of the City address highlights:

Watch the 2019 State of the City address given by Mayor Bill de Blasio

Five takeaways from the State of the City. (NY Times)

“Plenty of money in the city. It’s just in the wrong hands!” The mayor preached distribution of wealth, came up short on the details. (NY Times)

The speech was focused on equality, workers and tenants’ rights, and income inequality, to go “bigger, bolder, and aim higher.” (Politico)

The city’s free 3-K program will expand to districts 6, 8, 9, 19 and 32. (Bklyner)

Bus speeds should increase 25% by the end of 2020 from 7.44 to 9.03 mph. Some tactics will be adding between 10 and 15 miles of dedicated lanes, revamp five miles, and installing barriers to protect bus lanes from drivers. The NYPD will also add a team of tow truck drivers dedicated to clearing bus lanes. (amNY)

New and modified ferry routes: Staten Island will be connected to Battery Park and W 39th Street and a new Coney Island line will stop at Bay Ridge on its way to Wall Street. The Soundview, South Brooklyn and Astoria routes will be expanded. (Curbed)

The mayor created the Office of Tenant Protection, whose details were long on promises and short on details. The office will seize the buildings of the city’s “worst landlords,” which is an interesting phrase considering the worst landlord in the city was recently declared to be… the city. (The Real Deal & Curbed)

Free eyeglasses will be provided to kindergarteners or first graders need them starting next school year in a partnership with Warby Parker. (Chalkbeat)

While the mayor touted successes on old pledges like the styrofoam ban and a plan to divest the city’s pensions from fossil fuels, there was no plans for new green initiatives. (Politico)

Also missing? The NYCHA crisis. (Gotham Gazette)


Albany is looking to make some sense out of our state’s elections, limiting donations from LLCs, create early voting, combining election days, voting by affidavit, and pre-registering to vote at the age of 16. (Politico)

The modernist treasures of Queens. (Curbed)

A Bike Mayor? Transportation Alternatives has a petition looking to add the position to champion cycling across city agencies. Is it any more odd than a “Night Mayor?” (Streetsblog)

The average jail population in the city is at its lowest since 1980. (Daily News)

UCB will close their East Village theater on February 9 amid financial problems. Some shows will be moved to SubCulture. (Vulture)

LIRR will begin service to Grand Central Terminal by the end of 2022. (6sqft)

The secrets of the St. Marks historic district. (6sqft)

The most dangerous neighborhood to walk in Queens? Flushing. (Streetsblog)

Okay, what the hell is “Rhode Island-style” pizza? (Bedford + Bowery)

A teacher who was fired for allegedly forcing black students to lie on the floor while she stepped on their backs is planning on suing the city for one billion dollars. (NY Post)

The 15 most anticipated restaurant openings this winter. (Eater)

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