The Briefly for August 8, 2019 – The “Boycotting Mega Rich Trump Supporters is Messy Business” Edition

How to research apartment buildings, One World Trade’s scent, stand-out dishes in the West Village, Cuomo tries to change the gun conversation and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

How should the city’s justice system fight gun violence? The NYPD and Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez have differing opinions, and no matter how difficult it is for them to see eye-to-eye on the matter, no one can ignore that shootings are up 10% and gun arrests are up 91% in Brooklyn. (NY Times)

It was a mass panic in Times Square as people fled for safety, storming bars or theaters, literally anywhere to escape what sounded like gunshots. It was a motorcycle backfiring. (NY Times)

You might be surprised how many playgrounds are built on top of cemeteries. (Untapped Cities)

On Wednesday, the outrage machine was aimed at Stephen Ross, the billionaire behind the Hudson Yards whose company owns Equinox, who is hosting a fundraiser for President Trump this weekend to the tune of a quarter-million dollars per person. People are calling on Equinox members to cancel their memberships, but if you’re looking to boycott businesses Ross has investments in, you better make a list, because it starts with SoulCycle, Momofuku, Milk Bar, &pizza, Beyond Sushi, and Bluestone Lane before you get into the companies his company invested in. When it comes to the mega-rich, boycotting is a messy business. (Eater)

Interested in finding out who you know that donated to Trump? Here’s an easy set of instructions to follow to make family gatherings really awkward this year. (Splinter)

Now that the primary is officially over, Melinda Katz is focused on the Queens DA election. (amNY)

If we’ve learned anything from the Katz/Cabán DA primary battle, it is that all votes count in NYC and everyone has to be extremely careful to make sure they fill out their ballots, affidavit or not, properly. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is attempting to shape the Democratic Primary by asking all candidates to endorse a list of gun reforms including banning assault weapons, creating a database to prevent the mentally ill from purchasing weapons, expanding buybacks, and “red flag” legislation that would allow individuals to seek court orders preventing others from buying guns. (Politico)

After a brief suspension, @placardabuse is back on Twitter, documenting all the different ways that cars with parking placards regularly abuse the privileges their placards may grant them. (Streetsblog)

12 stand-out dishes to try in the West Village. (Eater)

Where does the water go when you flush? Easy question, complex answer. (amNY)

One World Trade’s observatory has a scent, and it’s there on purpose. (NY Times)

How to research a building before you move in. You don’t want the reason that two-bedroom apartment is cheap to be because of the awful history of bedbug infestations. (Curbed)

An interview with State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, Brooklyn’s last standing elected Republican. She’s running for Congress to try to unseat Max Rose, possibly leaving the entire borough solidly blue in the process. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Sunshine Cinema building on the Lower East Side has been completely demolished. (Curbed)

The woman who was arrested and had her one-year-old son pulled out of her hands for sitting on the floor at a benefits office has, as expected, sued the city, the officers involved, the HRA and the NYPD. (Politico)

The city’s taxi regulators voted to approve the cap on ride-hailing app vehicles and limited how long drivers can wait for fares in Manhattan. In six months, the commission will evaluate if they should issue new licenses. (Patch)

Finding a pool table at a bar is getting more and rarer, but the tables are far from gone. (amNY)

Last week a judge recommended Daniel Pantaleo be fired for using an illegal chokehold that lead to Eric Garner’s death. One week later the protests have begun as the mayor has remained silent and the city waits for action from commissioner James O’Neill. (amNY)

The DOT announced a speed-up in the timeline for installing protected bike lanes on 4th Ave in Brooklyn, connecting Bay Ridge to Park Slope and will do so by the end of this year. While the city will never get Em Samolewicz back after she was killed by a driver in Sunset Park, her death isn’t going without action from the city to protect other cyclists from meeting the same fate. (Curbed)

A fund to honor Em at Third Root Community Health Center is being established that will welcome trans women & trans femmes to receive healing services from Third Root at no cost. Em was an admin staff member since 2016. (GoFundMe)

A farm? On Staten Island? Yes, and it’s part of the amenities. (The Real Deal)

Raising the minimum wage for restaurant workers hasn’t hurt the restaurant industry as a whole, despite protests to the contrary every time it’s proposed. (amNY)

A group of rent-stabilized tenants in the Lower East Side and Williamsburg are accusing their landlord of continuing with eviction harassment, illegal overcharges, and preferential rent hikes—despite New York’s recently passed rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

Thousands of children, parents and staff members from the Harlem Children’s Zone marched in this year’s Children’s March for Peace. The match started after an elementary school girl was hit with a stray bullet inside her apartment 25 years ago and with the recent rise in gun violence across the city and country, its message is needed more than ever. (amNY)

The mayor announced $9 million to revitalize social services in Brownsville in response to the recent mass shooting for anti-gun violence programs, to enhance response times from the Brooklyn Action Center, youth education programs, to hire more staff for the recreation center, and more. Last week Jumaane Williams called for more funding and not police to address future problems in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 12 hottest lunch spots right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 5, 2019 – The “Subway Supervillain Has Returned” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo recommended being fired, R Kelly denied bail, how trucks became Vision Zero’s biggest violators, the best lobster rolls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruption lottery winners are the 2, 3, A, #, N and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance Jr. is reviving an investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal from the Trump Organization. The investigation will be looking into if the Trump Organization falsified business records. (NY Times)

The city’s subway supervillain was back at it and was arrested for the seventeenth time for a subway-related offense. Isaiah Thompson is the man who was pulling emergency brakes on multiple subways, causing hundreds of delays. His latest arrest was for subway surfing. (NY Times)

The ten oldest parks in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The 42nd Street Shuttle will be “modernized,” which means some temporary delays and reduction of service. How modern? That’s questionable, but at the very least the trains and platforms will be ADA compliant, widened, and the cars themselves extended from four trains to six. (Second Ave Sagas)

The legal fight over the mega-development in the Lower East Side will continue on, but what started it? A 2016 decision by the de Blasio administration to classify residential buildings over eight stories “minor modifications” to the existing developments and could bypass the land review process kicked it off. The towers planned are 1,004-feet tall, 798-feet tall, 728-feet tall, and 724-feet tall, which all seems a bit more than minor modifications. (Bowery Boogie)

Daniel Pantaleo should be fired. That’s the decision that a police administrative judge came to in a Civilian Complaint Review Board case. Will he be? That’s a decision for James O’Neill, the NYPD commissioner, who can decide “no,” despite the judge’s decision. (NY Times)

Eric Garner’s family promised large protests if Pantaleo isn’t fired. (amNY)

What’s the history of the closet-sized “POLICE” building on Lee Avenue in Williamsburg? (Untapped Cities)

The total number of jobs in the city has gone up, but the total number of hours per week is down, essentially neutralizing the job gain when it comes to wages. The city’s lower than the average number of hours per week compared to the nation is an indicator of a substantial income gap that continues to widen. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio put a freeze on new licenses for Uber, Lyft and the like in a hope to reduce the number of cars on the streets and therefore reduce traffic and pollution. He also said, “We are not here to serve the corporate titans, we are here to serve the people.” Unfortunately, the aftermath of this is that cars that have licenses are rented out, creating corporate titans on a smaller scale and further reducing the wages he was hoping to save. (Kings County Politics)

Where to get fun, non-alcoholic drinks in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health has no 100-point violations, but it does include the Greenwich Social food hall. (Patch)

The Algonquin Hotel Cat Fashion Show featured outfits from Ada Nieves, and of course, there are photos. (Untapped Cities)

Why is it that when you send a piece of mail to someone in Brooklyn, but when you send it to Queens it’s sent to a specific neighborhood? There are myths about the reason and the post office can’t be fully be blamed either. It’s a bit of a mystery. (Gothamist)

An odd opinion piece from Polly Trottenberg, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, which seems to be focused on the difficulty the DOT’s job is when they keep getting sued by NIMBYs. (Streetsblog)

The country’s only floating pool is in the Bronx. fwiw, it’s floating on the East River, not in mid-air. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio is accused of using a state election fund to help his cash-strapped presidential campaign, which is a violation of federal finance laws. Law-breaking fundraising is nothing new to de Blasio. (Patch & NY Times)

Video: The Tiffany clock in Grand Central is worth $20 million, here’s why. (Viewing NYC)

R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking charges. (amNY)

He was denied bail, is being held in Brooklyn, and his lawyer claims that he is the real victim. (NY Times)

What are the most expensive homes for sale in each borough? Come on, you know you’re curious. (Patch)

Despite what this etiquette post from Gothamist says, I disagree and say it’s perfectly fine to read text messages from someone else’s screen on the subway. (Gothamist)

Last summer the water fountains on Roosevelt Island were shut off because the water they were serving up was contaminated. There is no indication that they will be functional in 2019. Pack a water bottle. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Highlighted by the recent killing of Em Samolewicz, how did large trucks become Vision Zero’s worst offenders? (Gothamist)

We need new laws that cause much more consequence if a motorist is negligent and they kill someone, even if it wasn’t their intention.” -Mayor de Blasio, responding to a question about on WNYC’s “Ask the Mayor” (Gothamist)

It is time to stop blaming cyclists for the problems on the city’s roads. (NY Times)

There are many reasons not to swim in the lake in Prospect Park, from the signs instructing you not to swim in the lake to the blue-green algae bacteria blooms that produce deadly toxins. Someone decided to give it a try anyway and he was dragged out of the lake by the NYPD and taken for psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau asks if you see additional police to “not be alarmed” as they engage in security theater after this weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. (amNY)

Gays Against Guns took to Times Square over the weekend to push for more gun control laws. (amNY)

The five best lobster rolls in the city. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for July 19, 2019 – The “It’s Called the Urban Heat Island Effect” Edition

The mayor wasted $220 million, ConEd keeps blacking out, an AriZona Iced Tea pop-up shop ends arrests, the best brunch spots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Portions of the R, L, 1, 5, and N trains are out this weekend, the 3 is out completely and more “fun” in this weekend’s planned subway disruptions and diversions. (Subway Weekender)

The story of Preserved Fish, the man. (Untapped Cities)

If it seems like the city heats up like an oven, you’d be right. The concrete absorbs heat, the glass reflects it, and the lack of open space prevents the heat from dissipating. It’s called the “Urban Heat Island Effect.” (Gothamist)

Quickly, what borough has the highest number of home listings with pools? Turns out it’s the Bronx. (Localize Labs)

This is the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard of, and I wanna be the best at it,” a firsthand account of the ecstasy and the agony of the Brooklyn Air Guitar Championships. (Hard Noise)

In 2015, the mayor spent $220 million to ensure that 5,000 apartments in Stuy Town would remain rent-regulated until at least 2035. When the state passed rent reforms, it made that $220 million irrelevant. (Gothamist)

If you’re on the 1, 2, or 3 lines, you’re gonna get hit with some major subway disruptions for the next month and a half of weekends. (6sqft)

“You’re the mayor. Use your authority. Because nothing has changed.” Protests outside city hall and police headquarters called for justice five years after the death of Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

State Assemblymember Helen Rosenthal wants to end New York state school incubator projects for good. It’s not uncommon for ducks to be dumped in city parks where they are defenseless and wildlife rehabilitators spend time to find, feed, and care for the domesticated ducks that can’t survive on their own. (I Love the Upper West Side)

ConEd’s failures continue as blackouts continue to be a problem in portions of the city. Manhole fires caused outages in Maspeth, Elmhurst, Sunset Park, Borough Park, Flushing, parts of the Bronx, and the Upper West Side (again). ConEd blames the manhole fires on the heat, they also blame manhole fires on the cold when it’s cold. (Gothamist)

American Idol is coming to Greenpoint for auditions on July 23, so get ready to watch a bunch of New Yorkers embarrass themselves on television soon. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: Think about the nightmare of standing on a subway platform looking at the tracks when suddenly a construction wall gives out behind you, sending a flood of water towards you, knocking you off your feet headed towards the tracks. That was the reality at the Court Square-23rd Street subway station on Wednesday night. (Gothamist)

8 things you may not know about the American Museum of Natural History. (6sqft)

AriZona Iced Tea tried to sell 99 cent Adidas shoes at a pop-up shop on the Bowery on Thursday morning. It ended with two assaults, arrests, and the NYPD shutting the whole event down. (Eater)

10 must-see art shows to help beat the heat. (NY Times)

A brief guide to bike etiquette. (Gothamist)

What’s going on in Sunset Park? A second body was found in the waters off Sunset Park in two days. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Lower East Siders don’t argue that their neighborhood needs protection from flooding, but the loudest among them don’t appear to want that protection if it means having to live without the East River Park for three and a half years. (Gothamist)

El Chapo has been taken to an “undisclosed location,” which means he’s finally out of New York City’s hair/a>. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s calls for “due process” when comes to the Eric Garner case are a part of a pattern the mayor executes to avoid taking a stand on controversial issues that arises as a result of potential police misconduct. (The Indypendent)

Everyone be on the lookout for this jerk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What is it about the Brooklyn Youth Chorus that has attracted artists like Beyoncé Elton John, Alicia Keys, Grizzly Bear, and more to collaborate with them? (NY Times)

There are only 24 recognized professional air hockey players in the world. The New York Air Hockey Club is always looking for the next great players. (NY Times)

New York doesn’t discriminate when it comes to what stores get tagged by graffiti artists. Welcome to Ludlow Street, Louis Vuitton. (Bowery Boogie)

The New York City Triathalon has been canceled as a result of the heatwave, scheduled to take place on the city’s first 100-degree day in seven years. (Patch)

“Beautiful,” the Carole King Broadway musical is closing at the end of October after six years and grossing a quarter billion dollars. (NY Times)

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is back in the city filming season 3. (West Side Rag)

Enter Sandman. This Sunday New York Yankee’s closer Mariano Rivera will be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. (amNY)

A new state law prohibits race discrimination based on hair or hairstyles. (The Root)

9 places to enjoy a delicious brunch in the city. (NY Times)

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