The Briefly for December 20, 2018 – The “Elon Musk Does Not Have An Office on the Lower East Side” Edition

The mayor supports legal pot, Amazon can’t save the BQX, WeWork may be headed for a rude awakening, three boozy Taco Bells are headed to Manhattan and more in todays daily NYC news digest.

If you’ve paid for Spectrum internet access, you are owed between $75 and $150. The $62.5 million direct refund is a result of Spectrum’s settlement with the NY Attorney General’s office. (Gothamist)

Plotting the city’s parks in the only universally understandable way: a subway-style map. (6sqft)

WeWork is growing at an alarming rate. Is the boom headed for a bust? (The Real Deal)

That “Boring” company on the Lower East Side isn’t Elon Musk, it’s an art installation that requires an appointment and an NDA. (Gothamist)

The mayor is throwing his weight behind legal marijuana with a 71-page report that also makes recommendations like a NYC sales tax, a minimum age of 21, encouraging diversity in the pot business, and more. (amNY)

If you missed the Nitehawk cinema opening in Park Slope, there are photos. (Brownstoner)

From 0 to 20 in 15 seconds! These new “faster” subways aren’t exactly… fast. (Curbed)

The site of the holy matrimony between Billy Joel and Christie Brinkley will become part of Amazon’s HQ2. (Untapped cities)

Why doesn’t NYC have micro-apartments like other cities? It’s all about the price per square foot. (StreetEasy)

The Frigid Fyre Fest has hit a new low. The WinterFest organizers are now threatening vendors who speak to the press. (Gothamist)

Landlords don’t like legislation that limits their ability to raise commercial rent. (The Real Deal)

The city’s worst landlord isn’t someone named Trump or Kushner, it’s the the city. (Curbed) An example? Meet the Moran family, who has been without heat for nearly 20 years. (NY Post)

Part bar, part retail and part… Taco Bell!? Yup, three boozy Taco Bells are headed for Manhattan so you can Live Más. (Eater)

Two bills are headed for City Council that could reshape safety in bars (and three Taco Bells in Manhattan) by making “harassment free” signage mandatory and mandatory sexual harassment prevention and intervention training for all nightlife security. (Brokelyn)

19 curries to try in NYC. (Eater)

The Brooklyn District Attorney is set to wipe out 1,400 warrants in misdemeanor weed possession cases and 28 convictions in the next 90 days. (NY Post)

The death of a woman found in the trash chute of a luxury building was ruled an accident. Here’s no answer about how it happened, but there is no suspicion of foul play. (NY Post)

The lawsuit preventing the American Museum on Natural History from expanding was appealed and construction is suspended until the case is settled. (Curbed)

Shekema Young, who was arrested for allegedly slashing two women on the bus, says she’s innocent and the two victims were threatening to take Miss Beezy, her shih tzu yorkie mix. (Gothamist)

The NYPD rescued a frightened and freezing kitten from the undercarriage a car. Nothing else, just some good news for your Thursday. (NY Post)

Even Amazon’s money can’t save the mayor’s pricey and ill-advised BQX streetcar plan. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York’s rape shield laws are supposed to protect victims, but in most cases it makes it “almost impossible to successfully prosecute rapists, let alone millionaire celebrity rapists” like Harvey Weinstein. (Gothamist)

The president and CEO of New York Public Radio, Laura R. Walker, will be stepping down after 23 years. Walker acknowledged during her time she prioritized growth over people, and the last year of her employ was highlighted with accusations of harassment and discrimination against hosts of popular shows. (NY Times)

The best bars in the city, according to Thrillist.

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The Briefly for November 19, 2018 – The “MTA is On the Edge of a Death Spiral” Edition

Holding affordable housing hostage in Brooklyn, Prospect Park Lake’s “Floating Goat,” plans to privatize the NYCHA’s operations, the best burgers in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The house of the man who designed Central Park and Prospect Park sits in ruin on Staten Island. The New York Landmarks Conservancy is looking to restore Frederick Law Olmsted’s house and launched a Kickstarter to get it started. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the two options for the MTA fare hikes headed our way in 2019 as the entire system sits on the edge of a death spiral. (Second Ave Sagas)

A developer in Crown Heights is holding affordable units hostage if the city does not approve an upzoning their new development. (Bklyner)

In some parts of the city, limits on Community Board term-limits is a cause for concern when board seats already have a difficult time being filled. (Bronx Times)

If you’re questioning just how progressive de Blasio really is based on his support of Amazon’s LIC HQ2, you’re not alone. (The Real Deal)

The 24 best burgers in the city. (Eater)

Does the Sanitation Department’s boss, Kathryn Garcia, have too much on her plate? On top of being responsible for the city’s trash removal and snow-removal, the mayor also named her as the person to combat toxic lead across the city. (NY Post)

Can the private sector save the NYCHA? That’s exactly what is being considered. The plan would hand over management of repairs and renovations, but it will also sell unused air rights to develop new apartments on underused NYCHA land. (Curbed)

Signal work on the 7 train that started in 2010 is finally scheduled to finish at the end of the month. The work will allow extra trips when the L train shuts down in April. (Jackson Heights Post)

Why are some portions of Manhattan devoid of skyscrapers? The reason is less geological and more financial. (Laughing Squid)

1,500 affordable apartments were headed for LIC, but a certain online retailer’s plans for new offices have put that in jeopardy. (6sqft)

Breathe in, watch the mandarin duck in Central Park swimming in the snow, breathe out. (@notfapgod69)

What is “The Floating Goat” in Prospect Park Lake? (amNY)

The 25-year history of the Union Square Holiday Market. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio fired the chief of the Department of Investigations, and it’s hard to see that it was anything but a personal vendetta against a former friend. (NY Times)

The North Face’s new prototype store in Williamsburg includes a custom-scent made to remind you of Yosemite National Park. (Bedford + Bowery)

The stories of the stray cats of Red Hood. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

A checklist of restaurants and bars to check out before the L train shuts down, but make sure to check that the L train is actually running before venturing out. (amNY)

The best (and worst) spots to watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. (amNY)

The city is no longer without an FAO Schwarz. (Untapped Cities)

The chief responsible for the Harvey Weinstein case who led the NYPD’s special victim’s division (not executive produced by Dick Wolf) has been ousted. His replacement will be Deputy Chief Judith Harrison. (NY Times)

Despite the chaos and insane traffic during last week’s snow storm, the subway was… surprisingly functional. (NY Post)

Panna II, one of the city’s worst-reviewed restaurants, is one of the hottest reservations in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for October 25, 2018 – The “Signs of the L-pocalypse” Edition

Expect multiple fare hikes in the coming years from the MTA, the most annoying woman in Crown Heights, inside the collapse of PilotWorks, the Squirrel Census, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Inside the sudden collapse of Pilotworks, the food incubator that housed about 175 small businesses. (The Bridge)

Bike lanes have been painted on 12th and 13th St, one of the first signs of the L-pocalypse. (Chelsea Now)

The MTA’s new station managers are focusing on making the subways look cleaner, but the results aren’t easily seen. Will a visible difference on the platform make more of an impact than noticeably better service? (Gothamist)

“Unless we get a sustainable new source of revenue, we have no other options to balance our budget after 2019.” Expect fare hikes and service cuts in the coming years as the MTA won’t be able to fill their budget gap. Where’s that $37 billion going to come from to fix the subways? (amNY)

11 NYC restaurants made it on to OpenTable’s 50 best vegetarian restaurants list. (amNY)

Meet Kathleen Reilly, the most annoying woman in Crown Heights. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Thousands of new apartments are being built on the Lower East Side, here is a map of all of them. (Curbed)

After his failed Lieutenant Governor Democratic nomination bid, Councilmember Jumaane Williams has his eyes set on NYC’s Public Advocate position. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The thrill of the Central Park Squirrel Census is real, and it goes beyond the pencils and pins given to the volunteers (but they’re pretty cool too). (Atlas Obscura)

The city’s worst landlords are costing us $300 million annually. (Curbed)

Dean Skelos, once one of the most powerful men in Albany, will be going to jail for over four years for abusing his office to benefit his son. Speaking of his son, he’s going to jail for four years too. (NY Post)

TapeScape, at the Brooklyn’s Children’s Museum, looks like an Instagram-bait installation but in a real museum. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The anti-MAGA #KeepNYCTrashFree posters popping up around the city is the work of artist Winston Tseng, who was the man behind the parody “Your Train is Delayed” ad campaign. (Gothamist)

Will Brooklyn’s Watchtower sign be replaced? The Board of Standards and Appeals will make the decision on November 8. (Curbed)

The race between Marty Golden and his Democratic opponent Andrew Gounardes is one of the city’s most interesting. Their debate, covering gender identity, abortion, state-wide health insurance, and more. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The morning after their debate, Golden’s office had the words “Marty Golden defends Nazis” in chalk in front of his district office, a criticism of his refusal to fire a campaign staffer who invited the leader of the Proud Boys to speak at the GOP club on the Upper East Side. (Kings County Politics)

Consent is mandatory. (Bedford and Bowery)

Two women were found dead and duct-taped together under a pier at W 68th and Riverside Park South on Wednesday afternoon. The NYPD are investigating. (NY Post)

Rent is at an all-time high in Manhattan ($3,247!), but the borough’s home sales in saw their largest drop in Q3 since the financial crisis. (StreetEasy)

Fort Greene’s Great Pupkin Dog Halloween Costume Contest was moved from this Saturday to Sunday. Plan accordingly! (Gothamist)


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