The Briefly for March 17, 2020 – The “Order A Cocktail With Your Take Out” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor was forced into making the decision to close the schools, Barclays Center workers will be paid during the NBA shut down, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 54˚
Light rain in the morning.

Ample Hills Creamery filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, citing cost overruns on its Red Hook factory. Ample Hills has taken $12 million in investments since 2015. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

A woman who was handcuffed by the NYPD during active labor before her son’s birth, as well immediately following delivery, has filed a civil rights lawsuit against the city, saying the incident made her feel “less than human.” (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

An alternate subway map from 1939, which included a plan for the D train to go to Staten Island and the N train going to LaGuardia. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)


Here is a crowdsourced document with resources for everyone ranging from medical and mental health resources, virtual tours, places to donate, etc. (Thanks to Ariana for sending this in)

Caveat, the nerdy and quirky venue on Clinton St in Manhattan, will be streaming its programming this week, including Let’s Play with Comedians with Mark Vigeant tonight (Tuesday) at 7pm. (Caveat)

Tonight Puccini’s “La Bohème” will be streaming for free from the Met Opera tonight. You can catch Bizet’s Carmen until 3:30pm. (Met Opera)

Veselka in the East Village is offering buy one get one for Tuesday. Give them a call if you’re interested. (@veselkanyc)

The city is offering grab and go lunches for students and to aid in remote learning the city is providing as many laptops as possible to households with no internet connectivity. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

What you need to know about NYC’s school closures. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Wu-Tang has some advice about how to Protect Ya Neck Against Coronavirus. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Most co-working facilities are closed. WeWork remains open. But why? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

John Oliver is on hiatus, but not without putting the entirety of his last show for HBO on YouTube. (Last Week Tonight)

Mayor de Blasio has done some stupid things in his time as mayor, but this might take the cake. Despite everything going on, this dope was driven 12 miles to the YMCA in Park Slope to get one last workout session in, despite telling the city to assume that we have already been exposed to the virus. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The response to the pandemic shows us all what is possible but just doesn’t happen. Yes, bars and restaurants are shut down, but now you can order a cocktail to go with your meal. Anything that’s sold behind the bar can also be ordered. This is a good moment to tell you to order directly from the restaurant. Yes, Seamless is easier, but we are in a moment where every small business in your neighborhood needs every dime possible to stay afloat. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The impact of COVID-19 on the city’s economy is likely to be worse than 9/11 with over half a million people losing jobs in the tourism and hospitality sectors alone. (Patrick McGreen for NY Times)

The city’s nightlife industry accounts for $35 billion in revenue, with workers earning $13 billion. There is no timeline for reopening. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s crackdown on electric bikes is on hold. Now would be an excellent time to make them legal instead of illegal, but accepted. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Workers at the Barclay Center will be paid lost wages during the NBA shutdown. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: The Gotham Bar and Grill closed for good on Saturday Night, and they celebrated with a party full of a lack of irresponsible social distancing and a disregard for the long-term consequences for it. (Gary He for Eater)

You’re home, you have your favorite restaurants or bars on the mind. If you’re looking for a way to show your support, get a gift certificate. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

As we learn, the mayor didn’t come to the decision to close schools and bars and gyms himself, he didn’t trust the advice of the people closest to him either, he was forced into the decisions by his staff and a rebellious teacher’s union. (Jeffery C. Mays and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A Department of Correction staffer who tested positive for COVID-19 died on Sunday evening, one of seven deaths of coronavirus patients reported in New York state so far. They supposedly had limited contact with people in custody. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Some photos of Lower Manhattan looking very empty. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: This is what Carroll Gardens looks like during the pandemic. Hopefully showing people what these areas look like without people in them reduces anyone’s need to go to these places. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

Are cancelations newsworthy anymore? Reading through an endless list of things closing or being postponed shows just how much is happening in the city on a regular basis and none of it is happening this year. The Met Gala has been postponed indefinitely. (Vanessa Friedman and Jessica Testa for NY Times)

Get your grocery shopping done and don’t wait until the store’s last listed hours on their Google Maps listing. Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Stop&Shop, and Aldi are reducing hours. As one Trader Joe’s employee put it, it’s like the day before Superstorm Sandy every day for the last three weeks. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Despite everything else being up in the air, there have not been any service changes for the MTA. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the evolving and regularly infinite job of a group station manager for the MTA in the time of a pandemic. (Andy Newman and Earl Wilson)

The Brooklyn Arts Council organized a digital booklet of resources on healthcare, newly available funding, organizing tips, and other critical information for artists. (The Brooklyn Reader)

New York may soon need 18,000 ventilators, right now it’s 15,783 short. The federal government has a stockpile of ventilators, but President Trump’s literally response to a call for them was “try getting it yourselves.” Encouraging. (Brian M. Rosenthal and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A statewide suspension of evictions is in place indefinitely, as all non-essential functions of the courts have been postponed until further notice. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Judges, ICE prosecutors, and immigration lawyers are all asking for the same thing. Shut down the immigration courts. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

18 picks for restaurants offering new takeout and delivery options. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 21, 2020 – The “Go Back to Iowa, Go Back to Ohio” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The pink gumball machine mystery has been solved, the secrets of the city’s oldest comedy barker, the true history of Central Park’s Great Lawn, and more

Today – Low: 21˚ High: 32˚
Clear throughout the day.

A longtime staffer to Assemblyperson Catherine Nolan and Long Island City resident, Edwin Cadiz, has been named the 2020 NAACP “Man of the Year.” (QNS)

The origin of the pink gumball machines that popped up around Manhattan and Brooklyn has been revealed. They were installed in promotion of Strokes’s drummer Fabrizio Moretti’s new project called machinegum. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

“”Go back to Iowa, you go back to Ohio. New York City belongs to the people that were here and made New York City what it is,” is a fine thing for your local loon to scream on a corner, but not for Eric Adams, the current borough president of Brooklyn and mayoral hopeful in 2021. The comments came at an event in Harlem about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s impact, where more than a few speakers spoke about gentrification without weirdly xenophobic comments. He followed it up with “I’m a New Yorker. I protected this city. I have a right to put my voice in how this city should run.” (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

Internal emails show that New York City’s special drug prosecutor has a database of police officers with potential honesty problems. Similar databases from the DA’s office from each of the five boroughs’ offices have been released thanks to Freedom of Information requests. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

Video: Inside Staten Island’s secret Chinese Scholar’s Garden. (ActionKid)

The Union Square Coffee Shop neon “COFFEE” sign was replaced with a Chase bank sign. (EV Grieve)

Apartment Porn: Go inside this $4 million custom build Williamsburg penthouse loft apartment. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Gospel Missionary Baptist Church was booted from West 149th Street near Riverside Drive after a foreclosure sale, despite more than two decades in the neighborhood, thanks to a foreclosure sale due to unpair condo fees. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

89.5% of jaywalking tickets in 2019 went to blacks and Hispanics and the city’s politicians are taking notice of the seemingly racist enforcement by the NYPD. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The home of “The Original Spaghetti Donut” is coming to Smith St in Brooklyn. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

An interview with the New York Knicks’ Reggie Bullock about Pride Night at MSG and his LGBTQ activism since the murder of his transgender sister Mia. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The city’s 30 most dangerous school zones for pedestrians and cyclists. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

You know what’s better than camera enforcement of cars blocking bus lanes? Streets without cars. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Video: Watch the day turn to night behind lower Manhattan in a time lapse. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

After two water main breaks in one week caused extensive delays across the MTA, the MTA announced they’ll be examining the infrastructure in hopes of avoiding similar situations in the future. They also put blame on the city for slow response times to the broken water mains. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

In praise of the long dessert menu. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The secrets of Pete Burdette, the elder statesman of the city’s comedy club barkers who always keeps a rubber chicken in his pocket. (Alex Taub for NY Times)

Central Park’s Great Lawn began its existence not as a place to exercise or relax, but as a symbol of crippling poverty during the Great Depression. (Sam Neubauer for I Love the Upper West Side)

Nightmare: Your AirPods Pro headphone falls out of your ear and down a sidewalk grate. What do you do? Here’s how to get them back. (Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

The best speakeasy-themed bars in the city. (Amber Sutherland-Namako for Thrillist)

The Briefly for June 27, 2019 – The “If the City is One Big Mall, Are We All Mallrats?” Edition

Tiffany Cabán’s victory in Queens, The New Museum outlines its expansion, the MTA takes a dump on the morning commute and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Public defender Tiffany Cabán won the election for Queens DA, despite Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s unwillingness to concede for many hours. (amNY)

Tiffany Cabán’s victory, aided by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, was another failure of the Quens Democratic establishment as the borough continues to push even further to the left. (Politico)

Five things to know about Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

20 things Tiffany Cabán promised to do if elected as Queens DA, including declining to prosecute many non-violent crimes, change the charge standard for misdemeanors, hold the NYPD accountable, decriminalize marijuana, and more. (Gotham Gazette)

Councilwoman Farah Louis won her primary to all but secure the 45th District City Council seat, formerly held by Jumaane Williams. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York City isn’t becoming a mall. We’ve been in denial long enough, it’s time admit that New York City is a mall. All of the “retail hubs” like the ones at the World Trade Center, Essex Crossing, PIer 17, and the Hudson Yards? They’re all malls. (Curbed)

The 10 oldest churches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Those bus signs with the timers in them are great, except that 20% of them don’t work. (The City)

The Yankees are honoring the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots with a plaque in Monument Park. This isn’t the first non-Yankee plaque, with others honoring Nelson Mandela, the victims and rescue workers of 9/11, and popes Paul VI, John Paul II, and Benedict XVI. (Huff Post)

The Rent Guidelines Board approved rent increases of 1.5% for one-year leases and 2.5% for two-year leases for rent-stabilized apartments. (Gothamist)

19 fantastic LGBTQ bars in New York City. (Eater)

How to dress for a New York summer, from costume designer Luca Mosca, who happens to be John Wick’s tailor. (Gothamist)

Can you imagine the burden of always being right? There have been nearly 2,500 complaints of racial bias in the city since 2014 and the NYPD has not investigated a single one because the department hasn’t found anything wrong. (Gothamist)

The MTA Board is looking to ban repeat criminals from using the subway. Is it possible? “We can’t ban anyone right now and we won’t be able to.” Good thing the board is tackling the most important things first. (Patch)

The B, D, and F had awful mornings on Tuesday, with some trains sitting with closed doors for 45 minutes. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo, who says he doesn’t control the MTA, directed the MTA to create a task force to examine speed across the entire subway system, MetroNorth and the LIRR. (Politico)

40 years is a lot to do anything, which makes Peter Tsoumas’s run selling flowers at the First Ave L train station monumental. He has his first six months of retirement planned. After that, he’s open for suggestions. (Bedford + Bowery)

Step inside The Bureau of General Services — Queer Division, the bookstore on the second floor of The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Community Center on W 13th. (amNY)

A-Rod is slowly trying to become the A-Rod of NYC real estate with a plan to purchase multiple multi-family homes in the city. (6sqft)

Employment in Lower Manhattan has reached pre-9/11 levels for the first time since the attacks, according to the Alliance for Downtown New York. (Chelsea Now)

An updated list of what art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

The man who gave us I Heart NY was Milton Glaser, a New Yorker from the East Village. Another piece of work from Glaser is the murals of the Astor Place station. (GVSHP)

New York’s richest person shouldn’t surprise you. (Patch)

You’ll find Fredd E. “Tree” Sequoia behind the bar of the Stonewall Inn, the same man who was behind the bar on June 28, 1969. (amNY)

It’s been a years-long fight, but the Elizabeth Street Garden in Nolita will become affordable housing for seniors after approval from the city council. (Curbed)

Perry Rosen is one of Brooklyn’s last jukebox and pinball repairmen. (Viewing NYC)

Despite rejection by the community board and objection from Staten Island Borough President Jimmy Oddo, Staten Island’s Bay Street’s rezoning was approved by the city council, guaranteeing to change the neighborhood. (Curbed)

The Islanders will continue to split their home games between Long Island and the Barclays Center, being in the unique position to disappoint multiple crowds throughout the season. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The New Museum revealed its plans for its 2022 expansion. (EV Grieve)

With the state’s 2019 legislative session over, what’s next for Democrats in 2020? (Politico)

Where to Eat and Drink in Dumbo. (Eater)

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