The Briefly for January 8, 2021 – The “Call the Terrorists Terrorists” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: “Am I Eligible” Covid-19 website site launches, defending a parking lot of housing, a Tim Burton-themed restaurant opens, and more

Today – Low: 27˚ High: 40˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 27˚ High: 39˚

Between empty offices and Covid-19 restrictions, Financial District restaurants are struggling. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Who would advocate for an NYPD tow pound instead of a residential building? The lunatics in lower Manhattan. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Pro-Trump Terrorist Louis Shenker, 22, of Amherst, Massachusetts was charged with placing a false bomb and making a terroristic threat for a bomb hoax at the Queens Place Mall on Monday. The Gothamist headline claims he was a “Pro-Trump Activist,” but that’s bullshit. Gothamist, you should be better than that. He’s literally being charged for making terroristic threats and has known ties to white nationalists. Louis Shenker is a terrorist and shame on the editors of Gothamist for not acknowledging reality. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

More than 30 percent of New York City’s health care workers remain “hesitant” to get a coronavirus vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city’s schools shortened their quarantine period from 14 days to 10 days after a possible exposure to Covid-19, following a CDC recommendation. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The state has a new “Am I Eligible” website that will notify you when you are eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Beetle House, a Tim Burton-themed restaurant, is open for outdoor dining in the East Village. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Bombora House, an interactive stained glass house installation from Tom Fruin, can be seen at the corner of 13th and Ninth Ave. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side, which closed in October, is reopening next month under new ownership. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Another judge ruled in favor of the homeless New Yorkers that were relocated to the Lucerne Hotel. The case is still working its way through the courts, but they won’t be forced to leave for a few more months. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

The city is moving the homeless New Yorkers in the DoubleTree Hotel on West 36th Street to another hotel on 40th St after a request by the Community Board, claiming density as the main issue. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

10 new delivery-only restaurants born out of the pandemic. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Pixar’s Soul takes place in NYC, eight ways ‘Soul’ gets NYC right. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

There are 100 free car parking spaces for every bicycle spot in NYC, according to a new study from Transportation Alternatives, which asks the city to make the city more bike-friendly by installing 1,500 new bike parking spaces, among other changes. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Actions have consequences, but inaction also has consequences. 66-year-old Eleanor Dowe left her 19th-floor apartment on her way to a dialysis appointment and used the stairs because the elevators were out and slipped and struck her head, causing a severe brain injury. She had made 15 calls about broken elevators to NYCHA since August. Now she’s in a coma. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The NYPD sent around a memo reminding its members that illegal parking is illegal. Mayor de Blasio cut two units from the city’s budget that were dedicated to enforcing placard abuse. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The former tenants of a Dean Street building are looking to be included in the city’s lawsuit against their former eco-yogi slumlords. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

A Trader Joe’s is coming to Harlem. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

“Moynihan is not perfect, and I know better than anyone else that this train hall is technically not Pennsylvania Station. But for the moment it’s close enough.”
-Justin Rivers, Moynihan Train Hall is Not Perfect, But It’s Close Enough for Untapped New York

An NYPD officer was seen on video appearing to kneel on a Black man’s neck during an arrest in Queens last week. You’ve gotta be kidding me with this. The city’s chokehold ban makes kneeling on a person’s back or neck a misdemeanor. The man arrested is said to have suffered knee and neck injuries while being arrested. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Say hello to the latest list of the most expensive neighborhoods in the city, with NoHo taking the top spot with a median sales price of $3,250,000. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo says this is the year for legal weed in New York. But also 2020 was the year for legal weed in New York. But also 2019 was the year for legal weed in New York. What’s different this time? New York needs money. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

In another attempt to make some cash, Governor Cuomo has also stated his support for legalizing online sports betting in New York. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Farewell to Halloween Adventure in the East Village, the city’s only Halloween Store open in January. After 39 years, the store will be closing soon. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Only 52 people were arrested in connection with the attack on the Capitol, compare that to the more than 40 people arrested on the first night of NYC protests after the death of George Floyd. (Rachel Holliday Smith and Eileen Grench for The City)

Queens’ first IKEA is set to open later this month in Rego Center on Queens Blvd. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Have you ever wanted to see what $2 million in heroin and fentanyl looks like? A packaging mill in the Bronx was busted by the DEA and five people are facing criminal charges. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If you missed Mean Girls on Broadway before the pandemic, you really missed it. Mean Girls will not reopen when Broadway returns, whenever that might be. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

[plant-baked] opens today on 7th St, a plant-based bakery. They’re already open and will close when they run out of baked goods to sell. (EV Grieve)

2020’s saddest restaurant closures. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 4, 2020 – The “Batten Down the Hatches!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The reason for the spike in shootings, Open Restaurants will continue next year, how to stay safe on mass transit, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

President Trump and his company are being investigated for possible bank and insurance fraud by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance. (William K. Rashbaum and Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is once again open to visitors. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

The city is getting ready for a storm surge of 1-2 feet during Tuesday’s expected downpour from Tropical Storm Isaias. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Eataly’s new summer rooftop restaurant, opening on August 7. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

According to an NYC Hospitality Alliance survey, only 17.2% of restaurants and bars say they’re able to pay 50% or more of their rent. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

One-third of the city’s small businesses may close forever, according to a report from the Partnership for New York City with job losses already at 520,000. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New York state is extending its unemployment insurance past the 26-week limit through the end of the year. (East New York News)

All about rent increases. When can it happen, how much can it be, and how to check if your apartment is stabilized. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

The NYPD’s 26th Precinct has a Twitter problem. The precinct is in the heart of Harlem and their Twitter account has a history of hitting the like button on tweets about conspiracy theories, QAnon, and Trump. After being caught, the account removed the likes. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Evergreen headline for the moment: “The NYPD is investigating shootings.” (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

The mayor has his own ideas, as does Commissioner Shea, but the data shows the reason for the city’s spike in shootings is a plummeting number of gun crime arrests. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

NYPD officer Richard Catapano was found dead in his Astoria apartment from an apparent suicide. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Enjoying Open Restaurants? They’ll be back next year, starting on June 1. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In addition to Open Restaurants returning next year, the city is making curbside dining permanent from June 1 to October 31. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Photos: See the 193 new Rockefeller Center flags designed by the public. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Photos: 22 new libraries opened this week to offer grab-and-go service. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Maintenance workers and security guards at Columbia University will not be going on strike after TWO Local 241 reached an agreement with the university. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

The most expensive area to live in the city during the first half of the year was the 10014 zip code, covering the West Village and Greenwich Village will set you back a median price of $4.2 million. Tribeca’s 10013 was in second place at $3.1 million. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk through Prospect Park from dog beach to Parkside Avenue. (ActionKid)

A Walgreen grows in Brooklyn. (Greenpointers)

A basket intended to prevent debris from falling off of elevated subway tracks onto pedestrians… fell onto a pedestrian on Sunday. An NYC Transit Interim SVP calling it “a very unfortunate incident.” The person hit was taken to the hospital and was reported to be in stable condition. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

If the city’s schools open, what is the city’s plan to get all 150,000 students who rely on buses to school? “The DOE is recommending that families, wherever possible, help reduce the number of students in need of busing by either transporting their children to school on their own, walking, or biking,” aka “you’re on your own.” Got it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Video: Drone footage of all eight Black Lives Matter murals in NYC. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist, video from @mingomatic)

Despite the city’s plans to reopen the schools for the fall, Governor Cuomo has yet to make a decision to allow any school in the state to reopen. He’s expected to announce a decision this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Shootings jumped 177% in July compared to last year, according to the NYPD. Assaults and reported rapes declined year-over-year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Black Lives Matter mural walls in Gowanus were defaced with the tired response of “All Lives Matter.” This is the wall that was accidentally painted over once, so I have confidence that this will be fixed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Photos and Video: The red-tailed hawks of Governors Island. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Tips on how to stay safer on mass transit. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Photos: What the hell is going on with the splashes of blood outside this meat market in Astoria? (Give Me Astoria)

Can you think of a good reason that Williamsburg has more trash cans than Bed Stuy? No, seriously, it’s not a setup to a joke. “Bed Stuy Strong, Safe and Sanitary” wants your input. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Meet Diana Florence, a candidate for Manhattan District Attorney and a former leader of the Construction Fraud Task Force within the DA’s office. She stepped down in January amid allegations that she withheld evidence. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

Facebook signed its 730,000 square foot lease in the Farley Post Office building. When will it move in? That’s a whole other story. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

A judge weighed in on some disputed ballots in NY-12’s Democratic congressional primary allowing some invalidated votes to be counted, but not enough to sway the primary away from incumbent Carolyn Maloney towards challenger Suraj Patel. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

15 summery brunch options for takeout and delivery. (Eater)

The Briefly for March 17, 2020 – The “Order A Cocktail With Your Take Out” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor was forced into making the decision to close the schools, Barclays Center workers will be paid during the NBA shut down, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 54˚
Light rain in the morning.

Ample Hills Creamery filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, citing cost overruns on its Red Hook factory. Ample Hills has taken $12 million in investments since 2015. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

A woman who was handcuffed by the NYPD during active labor before her son’s birth, as well immediately following delivery, has filed a civil rights lawsuit against the city, saying the incident made her feel “less than human.” (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

An alternate subway map from 1939, which included a plan for the D train to go to Staten Island and the N train going to LaGuardia. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)


Here is a crowdsourced document with resources for everyone ranging from medical and mental health resources, virtual tours, places to donate, etc. (Thanks to Ariana for sending this in)

Caveat, the nerdy and quirky venue on Clinton St in Manhattan, will be streaming its programming this week, including Let’s Play with Comedians with Mark Vigeant tonight (Tuesday) at 7pm. (Caveat)

Tonight Puccini’s “La Bohème” will be streaming for free from the Met Opera tonight. You can catch Bizet’s Carmen until 3:30pm. (Met Opera)

Veselka in the East Village is offering buy one get one for Tuesday. Give them a call if you’re interested. (@veselkanyc)

The city is offering grab and go lunches for students and to aid in remote learning the city is providing as many laptops as possible to households with no internet connectivity. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

What you need to know about NYC’s school closures. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Wu-Tang has some advice about how to Protect Ya Neck Against Coronavirus. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Most co-working facilities are closed. WeWork remains open. But why? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

John Oliver is on hiatus, but not without putting the entirety of his last show for HBO on YouTube. (Last Week Tonight)

Mayor de Blasio has done some stupid things in his time as mayor, but this might take the cake. Despite everything going on, this dope was driven 12 miles to the YMCA in Park Slope to get one last workout session in, despite telling the city to assume that we have already been exposed to the virus. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The response to the pandemic shows us all what is possible but just doesn’t happen. Yes, bars and restaurants are shut down, but now you can order a cocktail to go with your meal. Anything that’s sold behind the bar can also be ordered. This is a good moment to tell you to order directly from the restaurant. Yes, Seamless is easier, but we are in a moment where every small business in your neighborhood needs every dime possible to stay afloat. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The impact of COVID-19 on the city’s economy is likely to be worse than 9/11 with over half a million people losing jobs in the tourism and hospitality sectors alone. (Patrick McGreen for NY Times)

The city’s nightlife industry accounts for $35 billion in revenue, with workers earning $13 billion. There is no timeline for reopening. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s crackdown on electric bikes is on hold. Now would be an excellent time to make them legal instead of illegal, but accepted. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Workers at the Barclay Center will be paid lost wages during the NBA shutdown. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: The Gotham Bar and Grill closed for good on Saturday Night, and they celebrated with a party full of a lack of irresponsible social distancing and a disregard for the long-term consequences for it. (Gary He for Eater)

You’re home, you have your favorite restaurants or bars on the mind. If you’re looking for a way to show your support, get a gift certificate. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

As we learn, the mayor didn’t come to the decision to close schools and bars and gyms himself, he didn’t trust the advice of the people closest to him either, he was forced into the decisions by his staff and a rebellious teacher’s union. (Jeffery C. Mays and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A Department of Correction staffer who tested positive for COVID-19 died on Sunday evening, one of seven deaths of coronavirus patients reported in New York state so far. They supposedly had limited contact with people in custody. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Some photos of Lower Manhattan looking very empty. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: This is what Carroll Gardens looks like during the pandemic. Hopefully showing people what these areas look like without people in them reduces anyone’s need to go to these places. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

Are cancelations newsworthy anymore? Reading through an endless list of things closing or being postponed shows just how much is happening in the city on a regular basis and none of it is happening this year. The Met Gala has been postponed indefinitely. (Vanessa Friedman and Jessica Testa for NY Times)

Get your grocery shopping done and don’t wait until the store’s last listed hours on their Google Maps listing. Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Stop&Shop, and Aldi are reducing hours. As one Trader Joe’s employee put it, it’s like the day before Superstorm Sandy every day for the last three weeks. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Despite everything else being up in the air, there have not been any service changes for the MTA. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the evolving and regularly infinite job of a group station manager for the MTA in the time of a pandemic. (Andy Newman and Earl Wilson)

The Brooklyn Arts Council organized a digital booklet of resources on healthcare, newly available funding, organizing tips, and other critical information for artists. (The Brooklyn Reader)

New York may soon need 18,000 ventilators, right now it’s 15,783 short. The federal government has a stockpile of ventilators, but President Trump’s literally response to a call for them was “try getting it yourselves.” Encouraging. (Brian M. Rosenthal and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A statewide suspension of evictions is in place indefinitely, as all non-essential functions of the courts have been postponed until further notice. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Judges, ICE prosecutors, and immigration lawyers are all asking for the same thing. Shut down the immigration courts. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

18 picks for restaurants offering new takeout and delivery options. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!