The Briefly for August 5, 2019 – The “Subway Supervillain Has Returned” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo recommended being fired, R Kelly denied bail, how trucks became Vision Zero’s biggest violators, the best lobster rolls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruption lottery winners are the 2, 3, A, #, N and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance Jr. is reviving an investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal from the Trump Organization. The investigation will be looking into if the Trump Organization falsified business records. (NY Times)

The city’s subway supervillain was back at it and was arrested for the seventeenth time for a subway-related offense. Isaiah Thompson is the man who was pulling emergency brakes on multiple subways, causing hundreds of delays. His latest arrest was for subway surfing. (NY Times)

The ten oldest parks in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The 42nd Street Shuttle will be “modernized,” which means some temporary delays and reduction of service. How modern? That’s questionable, but at the very least the trains and platforms will be ADA compliant, widened, and the cars themselves extended from four trains to six. (Second Ave Sagas)

The legal fight over the mega-development in the Lower East Side will continue on, but what started it? A 2016 decision by the de Blasio administration to classify residential buildings over eight stories “minor modifications” to the existing developments and could bypass the land review process kicked it off. The towers planned are 1,004-feet tall, 798-feet tall, 728-feet tall, and 724-feet tall, which all seems a bit more than minor modifications. (Bowery Boogie)

Daniel Pantaleo should be fired. That’s the decision that a police administrative judge came to in a Civilian Complaint Review Board case. Will he be? That’s a decision for James O’Neill, the NYPD commissioner, who can decide “no,” despite the judge’s decision. (NY Times)

Eric Garner’s family promised large protests if Pantaleo isn’t fired. (amNY)

What’s the history of the closet-sized “POLICE” building on Lee Avenue in Williamsburg? (Untapped Cities)

The total number of jobs in the city has gone up, but the total number of hours per week is down, essentially neutralizing the job gain when it comes to wages. The city’s lower than the average number of hours per week compared to the nation is an indicator of a substantial income gap that continues to widen. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio put a freeze on new licenses for Uber, Lyft and the like in a hope to reduce the number of cars on the streets and therefore reduce traffic and pollution. He also said, “We are not here to serve the corporate titans, we are here to serve the people.” Unfortunately, the aftermath of this is that cars that have licenses are rented out, creating corporate titans on a smaller scale and further reducing the wages he was hoping to save. (Kings County Politics)

Where to get fun, non-alcoholic drinks in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health has no 100-point violations, but it does include the Greenwich Social food hall. (Patch)

The Algonquin Hotel Cat Fashion Show featured outfits from Ada Nieves, and of course, there are photos. (Untapped Cities)

Why is it that when you send a piece of mail to someone in Brooklyn, but when you send it to Queens it’s sent to a specific neighborhood? There are myths about the reason and the post office can’t be fully be blamed either. It’s a bit of a mystery. (Gothamist)

An odd opinion piece from Polly Trottenberg, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, which seems to be focused on the difficulty the DOT’s job is when they keep getting sued by NIMBYs. (Streetsblog)

The country’s only floating pool is in the Bronx. fwiw, it’s floating on the East River, not in mid-air. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio is accused of using a state election fund to help his cash-strapped presidential campaign, which is a violation of federal finance laws. Law-breaking fundraising is nothing new to de Blasio. (Patch & NY Times)

Video: The Tiffany clock in Grand Central is worth $20 million, here’s why. (Viewing NYC)

R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking charges. (amNY)

He was denied bail, is being held in Brooklyn, and his lawyer claims that he is the real victim. (NY Times)

What are the most expensive homes for sale in each borough? Come on, you know you’re curious. (Patch)

Despite what this etiquette post from Gothamist says, I disagree and say it’s perfectly fine to read text messages from someone else’s screen on the subway. (Gothamist)

Last summer the water fountains on Roosevelt Island were shut off because the water they were serving up was contaminated. There is no indication that they will be functional in 2019. Pack a water bottle. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Highlighted by the recent killing of Em Samolewicz, how did large trucks become Vision Zero’s worst offenders? (Gothamist)

We need new laws that cause much more consequence if a motorist is negligent and they kill someone, even if it wasn’t their intention.” -Mayor de Blasio, responding to a question about on WNYC’s “Ask the Mayor” (Gothamist)

It is time to stop blaming cyclists for the problems on the city’s roads. (NY Times)

There are many reasons not to swim in the lake in Prospect Park, from the signs instructing you not to swim in the lake to the blue-green algae bacteria blooms that produce deadly toxins. Someone decided to give it a try anyway and he was dragged out of the lake by the NYPD and taken for psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau asks if you see additional police to “not be alarmed” as they engage in security theater after this weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. (amNY)

Gays Against Guns took to Times Square over the weekend to push for more gun control laws. (amNY)

The five best lobster rolls in the city. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for June 13, 2019 – The “A New Subway Villain Has Emerged” Edition

The governor will sign the rent reform laws, the mayor looks to further restrict Uber and Lyft’s operations, the best veggie burger in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the city’s top ten public high schools. (Patch)

The city’s new mansion tax is hitting on July 1, and sellers are already trying to price their way out of it. (StreetEasy)

New York City has a new subway villain. On different incidents, a man threw a bag of concrete, a fire extinguisher, Christmas lights, and a shovel. (Gothamist)

10 buildings connected to NYC’s maritime past. (Untapped Cities)

The best restaurants of 2019, according to Eater’s Ryan Sutton. (Eater)

“There’s a daunting task ahead of us on this,” is an understatement by the chair of the committee overseeing the $4 billion reconstruction of the BQE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed the mannequin children strewn across the city in small cages? No Kids in Cages is responsible for the 25 protest installations across Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Outside of San Francisco, Brooklyn has the country’s most booming tech sector, growing 356% in the last ten years. (amNY)

Where to eat near the Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. (Eater)

While the Governors Island “urban camping experience” isn’t exactly camping by most stretches of the imagination with miniature cabins, 1500 thread count sheets, wifi, electricity, a spa, and room service, but it does look nice (6sqft)

In the last year, the city ensured a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers and prevented any new drivers from being added to the pool of e-hail vehicles which already makes up 29% of all cars below 60th in Manhattan. The mayor’s next restriction will be limiting the amount of time e-hail vehicles can cruise below 96th in Manhattan without a passenger. Currently, e-hail vehicles spend 41% of their time without passengers. That rate would have to drop to 31% under the coming rule, or companies would face fines or potentially have their licenses to operate revoked. (amNY)

Here is the horseshoe route for the World Pride Parade on June 30, which is expected to be the largest Pride Parade in history. (6sqft)

The DOT unveiled plans for a protected bike lane on Central Park West. The Community Board and City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal had called for a two-way bike lane, similar to Prospect Park West, but the DOT called that idea “psychologically unrealistic.” (Gothamist)

A guide to (responsibly) day drink. (The Infatuation)

I’m bullish on anything that brings more joy and delight to the city in a near-invisible fashion. See Me Tell Me is playing hide-and-seek with her art on Instagram. Right now the has under a thousand followers, but let’s see if we can’t change that. (Bedford + Bowery)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” may be the creed of the postal service, but in the city, it’s the food delivery person that follows that creed to the letter and City Comptroller Scott Stringer is adding his voice to those calling for the legalization of electric bikes with an op-ed for Streetsblog. (Streetsblog)

Take a ride on the 3rd Ave El in a film from 1955, documenting Manhattan’s last elevated subway line. (Viewing NYC)

The governor supports the rent reform bills that are working their way through the legislature and has voiced that once they’re on his desk he will sign them into law, which hasn’t always been a guarantee. (amNY)

When the rent reform bills become law, it will be the signal that the influence that New York’s real estate industry holds over the state’s politics is not untouchable. (NY Times)

Yoko Ono’s ‘The Reflection Project’ is moving into unconventional spaces in lower Manhattan, encouraging you to “rally the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.” Just don’t do it in someone else’s way. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Gem Spa on St Mark’s and Second Ave is in danger of closing. A combination of rising rents and a former employee selling cigarettes to a minor have threatened the iconic store’s 80-year existence. It’s likely the best place you can buy egg creams and fedoras and coffee and candy in the city. (Vanishing New York)

Another detainee died in the custody of the Department of Corrections two days after the death of Layleen Polanco on Rikers Island. The cause of death and name haven’t been released. (Patch)

This new IKEA robotic furniture looks right out of The Fifth Element. (6sqft)

The governor is pushing for the state to extend the statute of limitations for rape victims and change the legal definition of harassment. (Politico)

The new status symbol for performers is a Broadway residency and the latest name to make their way is Dave Chappelle. Dave Chappelle Live on Broadway will happen from July 9-13 with tickets going on same June 18th. (Gothamist)

A guide to Pride in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The House Judiciary Committee passed the bill to reauthorize and fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for about seven more decades after being publicly shamed by Jon Stewart. (Patch)

How did Jon Stewart become the voice of the ongoing victims of 9/11? (NY Times)

“It’s another entertainment show beginning with an overwrought speech of a shaken host.” The first Daily Show with Jon Stewart after the 9/11 attacks is still worth watching. (Comedy Central)

A first look at the new DUMBO library. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Drone photos and videos from high above Green-Wood Cemetery. (Gothamist)

The city’s best veggie burgers. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 31, 2019 – The “Stuyshwick? This is a Joke, Right?” Edition

The weekend subways, the NYPD has been lying to the public about rape numbers, a look at the art in the echoes of the Stonewall Inn riots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions have been pretty light for the last few weeks. That ends this weekend with 13 different subway lines carrying some variety of change in service to kick off June. (Subway Weekender)

The NYPD has been lying to the public for years about the number of rapes committed in NYC. While telling the public there were 6,626 rapes in a four and a half year span, they told federal officials there were 10,649 rapes. What the hell is going on with the 38% discrepancy? The NYPD only reports vaginal penetration as rape, not anal or oral. This would preclude the inclusion of any rape committed against men from this number. With this uncertainty, the one thing that is clear is that the NYPD is setting itself to fail when it comes to cases of rape in the city. (Gothamist)

Oh god. Someone is sincerely trying to make Stuyshwick a thing (where Bushwick and Bed-Stuy meet on Broadway under the J train). Anyway, here’s a “guide” to the “neighborhood.” (Grub Street)

Whoever thought of this moronic name should look back to 2013, when BEDWICK topped Time Out’s list of the dumbest fake neighborhood names. (Time Out)

After nearly a decade in the making, a pedestrian bridge replacing the Rector Street bridge finally open this fall. (Curbed)

Seven places to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman today. (Untapped Cities)

The City Council approved two bills aimed at making streets safer. One will hold the DOT accountable to add safety design elements to any street being redesigned and the second would require any contractors to create temporary bike lanes when disrupting any pre-existing lanes. (Curbed)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 9 appears to be on the verge of falling apart, as the search to fill the empty since 2015 role of district manager was about to be debated, three board members staged a walkout. The walkout resulted in less than a quorum, ending the meeting immediately. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Everyone wants a say in the Gowanus rezoning, the latest voice to want a seat at the table is the EPA. (Curbed)

The beginning of the end of the MetroCard officially begins today. (Gothamist)

If you’re confronted with an OMNY screen, here’s how to use your phone to pay for your subway ride. Until it is available at every station you can only pay per ride. (Patch)

You’ve probably heard that the city’s water is the cleanest of anywhere in the state. It’s not a rumor. It’s the truth. (Patch)

A look inside the $5.5 million makeover of Central Park’s SummerStage. (amNY)

Brace yourself, this one’s got a sad ending. The eight-month-old puppy who escaped his harness and jumped down onto the subway tracks at Herald Square was found dead near where he first escaped. Marley’s human companions are blaming the MTA. (Gothamist)

Seventeen years after the cleanup of Ground Zero was completed, a modest ceremony was held at the new Memorial Glade dedicated to the people whose related illnesses and deaths have followed in the subsequent years. (NY Times)

Following yesterday’s assessment of how NYU and Columbia’s neighborhoods are fresh hell when it comes to renting, here are the most affordable neighborhoods for fresh college graduates. (Curbed)

It’s the city’s fanciest McDonald’s, three stories tall, walls of glass, and open 24 hours a day. (Eater)

“Tastes of Brooklyn” is coming to Crown Heights’ Franklin Ave this Sunday, a street that inspired a joke of a podcast. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The city’s Lyft and Uber cars cause more pollution than cabs, thanks to the city’s hybrid fleet. The city’s 13,500 taxi emissions dropped 82% in 15 years. (Gizmodo)

Gravity knives are no longer illegal in New York. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Measles cases are at a 25 year high, with more than half of the nation’s cases being in the city. (NY Times)

The World Pride Mural Project Initiative has brought a new Buff Monster mural at the corner of Chrystie St & Broome St to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. (Brooklyn Street Art)

As we roll into June, the city’s streets, art galleries, and museums are focusing on the art centered on the riot/rebellion/resistance/uprising at the Stonewall Inn 50 years ago. The Times’ co-chief art critic looks at the historical significance that moment at the Stonewall Inn has had and how it has reverberated through art for half a century. (NY Times)

The BQX is such a pipe dream that advocates are pinning their hopes on a Democrat taking over the presidency in 2021 so the project has a remote chance of receiving the $1.3 billion necessary to cover just under half of the cost of the project. (Gothamist)

17 LGBTQ landmarks of Greenwich Village (6sqft)

Stolen: One orange bearded dragon. (Gothamist)

Behind the scene photos from Hart Island: The city’s mass burial ground. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to Jacob Riis Park Beach for the summer of 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go on a Saturday when you want to do something but don’t have plans. (The Infatuation)

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