The Briefly for July 29, 2020 – The “11% of NYPD Officers Have a Record of Misconduct” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Industry City’s rezoning is dead, Revel is on pause, where to eat in Chinatown, Trash Panda Park, Cuomo fights for control over the city, and more

Today – Low: 77˚ High: 89˚
Clear throughout the day.

Governor Cuomo is expanding his oversight on the city and its finances via three nominations to the seven-member Financial Control Board, which has oversight over the city’s budget. He’s nominated allies to the board and stated he’s looking to scrutinize the city’s fiscal outlook. Other board members are State Comptroller Tom Napoli, Mayor de Blasio, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, and Governor Cuomo. (Zack Fink for NY1)

While Governor Cuomo is fighting to hold more control over the city, the State Legislature is fighting to take control away from Governor Cuomo, seeking to limit his power over the state’s budget. The Budget Equality Act, which hasn’t been voted on yet, would allow the legislature to add to the budget in addition to its powers right now, which only allow a reduction in spending. A change would require an amendment to the state’s constitution, so this will become a multi-year fight. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: It has a 1,000 bottle wine room, a 1,200 square-foot terrace, an outdoor kitchen, and 6,400 square feet of space. All yours in Tribeca for the low, low price of $17.5 million. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

After two recent deaths, Revel has indefinitely suspended its service and review its safety measures in the city. The mayor called this “an unacceptable state of affairs.” Just imagine what he could actually get accomplished if the mayor stepped in when a system within the city is obviously broken and causing pain and suffering on a wide-spread basis. It should be noted that Revel has operated since 2018 and these two are the first reported deaths. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

1 out of ever 9 NYPD officers has a confirmed record of misconduct.3,796 out of 36,000 have at least one substantiated complaint against them. Most have received no penalty at all. (Christopher Robbins, George Joseph, Jake Offenhartz, Zach Gottehrer-Cohen, and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Unsatisfied that Portland get all the country’s attention for people being grabbed off the street, the NYPD has decided to get in on the action. NYPD officers grabbed 18-year-old Nikki Stone tossing her into an unmarked Kia minivan. Reports indicate she’s since been released. (Allyson Chiu for The Washington Post)

91 percent of public drinking tickets in the last six months went to Black and Latinx New Yorkers. Is anyone surprised? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

“With the Senate back in Washington working on another COVID-19 relief package, we at the MTA are fending off a fiscal tsunami. We’re simply trying to survive the rest of this year, and the next one, with our finances mostly intact. But to do that, we need help and we need it now – in the form of another $4 billion in federal aid to get through 2020.”
-Patrick Foye, Chairman and CEO of the MTA, MTA fiscal tsunami requires federal relief for Bronx Times

A little look at NYC’s history using augmented reality. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The history of animals in Central Park from the goat-drawn carriages to Hattie the snowplow elephant to the camels that helped plow the soil for planting. (Sam Neubauer for I Love The Upper West Side)

The city has suspended its brown bin composting program, but the LES Ecology Center is rolling out a phased reopening of food scrap drop-off sites with a few sites accepting scraps. (Tequila Minsky for amNewYork Metro)

The Yankees’ second game in two days was postponed while MLB tries to come to grips with the outbreak in the Marlins’ locker room. (Joe Pantorno for amNewyork Metro)

Governor Cuomo made the offer that New York state hosts the games for any MLB team that wants to play them, boasting the state’s infection rate is currently below 1%. For players, Cuomo would carve out a new exception from his out of state quarantine rules. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, DC, and Puerto Rico were all added to New York’s quarantine list, bringing the total up to 34 states. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

I nominate that Riverside Park be renamed Trash Panda Park after racoons have taken over. (Mike Mishkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

The Industry City rezoning is dead. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca is the deciding vote when it comes to the proposal and he has come out in strong opposition to it. Menchaca has laid out multiple conditions for his support and he says they were not met. ITs only hope is that Speaker Corey Johnson step in to rally the council against Menchaca, which seems unlikely. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

A moment of cute! A duck built a nest on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The staff is keeping an eye on it and the new family will be moved to Central Park when they’re ready to leave. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

“I don’t think this is the type of job we should just ‘wing it,’ and that’s the sense I’ve been getting sometimes.” The city’s contact tracing program is not off to a great start. (Sharon Offerman for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio says that unless the federal government’s new stimulus package includes more state aid, the city will be forced to layoff up to 22,000 workers. These are the jobs that he said could be saved with if the city can successfully renegotiate worker contracts with unions by October 1. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Thinking about heading to Long Island to go to the beach to avoid the city’s beaches? Good luck with those sharks. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

12 more bars have had their liquor licenses suspended by the State Liquor Authority, mostly in Jackson Heights, bringing the total to 29. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

For almost $1,000 you can enjoy a three-night stay in the Wythe Hotel, complete with a movie or TV show screening in the hotel’s private screening room. They’ll even throw in popcorn for free. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A federal judge granted a preliminary injunction instructing New York State to begin unemployment payments to Uber and Lyft drivers immediately and promptly. (Noam Scheiber for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Chintatown. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 15, 2019 – The “Cuomo Enters the Chazz Palminteri/Mayor De Blasio Feud” Edition

National Grid is told to hook-up new customers, a death at the Brooklyn Museum, Letitia James wins another fight against the Trump Administration, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late-night subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Common Cause New York is suing the state because it says New York’s law that allows the removal of voters from the list of “active” voters used at voting sites, which it says is a violation of the National Voter Registration Act. The federal court case begins today. (Gothamist)

Corey Johnson’s “master plan” a) needs a better name and b) will be voted on by the City Council, according to Corey Johnson. (Gotham Gazette)

If you’re here for the Chazz Palminteri/Mayor De Blasio feud in 2019 over a potential statue of an Italian-American saint, here it is. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, never one to not pile on the mayor, says he wants the statue honoring Mother Frances Cabrini in the city. (Patch)

Here’s a reminder of Corey’s Master Plan. (Curbed)

1,136 words from the Times, all to say riding the 14th St bus is good after the street was shut down to traffic. (NY Times)

Is it time to kill NYPL late fees? (Gothamist)

It’s been two weeks since NYPD officer Brian Mulkeen and Antonio Williams were killed by the NYPD and there are still large gaps of information missing about the incident. (Gothamist)

An NYCHA development is selling its air rights for $25 million, but over the next five years, it needs about $159 million in repairs. Can they sell their air rights seven times? (Curbed)

Real estate porn: A West Village townhouse built in 1822 with a basement library and prohibition-era secret tunnel that leads to a speakeasy down the street. (Viewing NYC)

Uber wants to expand its bike-share program in Staten Island, but also wants to severely limit its users’ ability to sue the company. Citi Bike, which is operated by Lyft, does not use forced arbitration, but it does force mediation. (Politico)

Governor Cuomo, never one to not pile on the mayor, says he wants the statue honoring Mother Frances Cabrini in the city. (Patch)

A man died at the Brooklyn Museum in a “freak accident” that involved him trying to slide down a banister and falling backward three stories to the ground on Saturday night. (Gothamist)

Schneps Media bought amNewYork and they’ve been dark ever since with the number of newsroom layoffs rumored to be between seven and 16. (NY Times)

Patch was less gentle, calling the newsroom “gutted.” (Patch)

The five men convicted of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman were sentenced on Friday. Martinez Estrella was sentenced to life without parole and the other four co-defendants received 25 to life. (Gothamist)

Attorney General Letitia James won another court battle against the President Trump administration with a federal judge blocking the “public charge” rule on Friday. (Politico)

Brooklyn Supreme Court Justice Sylvia Ashe was arrested on Friday for obstruction of justice which stems from an alleged scheme to cover up an embezzlement scandal involving MCU’s former CEO. Ashe is a former chair of the board of MCU’s directors. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York is the first state in the nation to require all ingredients to be listed on tampons, pads, menstrual cups, and period underwear. (Gothamist)

Before The Rolling Loud festival, the NYPD, the figurative and literal cops, asked organizers to remove 22Gz, Casanova, Pop Smoke, Sheff G, and Don Q from the lineup. (NY Times)

Bogdan Darmetko is the 25th cyclist killed in 2019 by a driver on the streets of the city. (Streetsblog)

Four men were killed in a shooting at an illegal social club in Crown Heights over the weekend. The police chief of patrol, Rodney Harrison, gave a quote that blamed the community for the illegal clubs’ continued operation and the deaths. (NY Times)

The governor ordered National Grid to stop playing games a provide gas to more than 1,100 new customers. The governor, never to get a job 100% done, and his demands only apply to the backlog of customers and don’t apply to new ones. (Brooklyn Paper)

Broad City’s Abbi & Ilana are back… to tell us all about the ballot questions on this fall’s elections. (Gotham Gazette)

15 cozy restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 11, 2019 – The “A Questionable Subject for a Broadway Musical” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway closures, what’s closed on Columbus Day, Tad’s Steaks is closing, the West Side Highway is slowing down, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Briefly will be taking Columbus day off this year. See you on Tuesday morning!

This weekend’s subway disruptions are on the 2, 5, A, D, E, F, J, N, Q, R, and W trains. (Subway Weekender)

A look around the city for what will be closed on Columbus Day. (Patch)

A Michael Jackson musical is headed to Broadway next summer. Yikes. (NY Times)

The tree-killing beetle that was infesting the city’s forests for two decades has finally been beaten, according to the Parks Department, who hasn’t seen the bug in the city since 2010. (Patch)

Gem Spa, its egg creams, and the constant fight for survival were put on the Atlas Obscura map. (Atlas Obscura)

The City Council voted to prohibit Rikers Island from housing any incarcerated individuals past 2026, giving the city very little wiggle room when it comes to closing the jail. Nothing like a deadline to keep you motivated. (Gothamist)

There are groups and elected officials in the city that are pointing out that if the city’s jail population can be reduced from 7,000 (where it is today) down to about 3,000 we can shut down Rikers Island without a need to build any community jails. (Jackson Heights Post)

Keith Haring’s “Crack Is Wack” mural is back in the appropriately named Crack is Wack Playground on E 129st St and Second Ave. (Gothamist)

Summer is barely over and here comes winter. The rink at Rockefeller Center opens this weekend. (amNY)

The 10 best apple and pumpkin picking spots near NYC. (6sqft)

In an attempt to lower the number of fatalities along the West Side Highway, the city will lower the speed limit from 35 to 30. There have been ten people killed by drivers on the West Side Highway since 2013. (Curbed)

The city’s last Tad’s Steaks, on Seventh Ave near Times Square, will close in January. (Gothamist)

Peter Luger launched online reservations to alleviate the stress of being one of the 6,000 daily phone calls they get to attempt to get a table. They aren’t fully joining the 21st century, as they still cash only. (amNY)

16 and 17-year-old are no longer supposed to be automatically prosecuted as adults, but Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Staten Island’s courts have been seemingly unable to follow the law. (The City)

There is no easy way to check liquor licenses and a new law seeks to change that. The governor signed a bill into law that will create a public database of information for on-premises liquor licenses. (Bowery Boogie)

Finding a new apartment sucks, but now it quantifiably sucks. (StreetEasy)

How Uber and Lyft cheat drivers out of minimum wage, explained. (The Indypendent)

The 19 best beer bars in the city. (Eater)