The Briefly for August 22, 2019 – The “Advertisements on Advertisements” Edition

A bloody night in Queens and Brooklyn, the mayor wants to save Di Fara, the governor invites him to pay their taxes, the best ice cream sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos: Take a look inside the Watchtower’s old headquarters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Elyse Marks is not your average restoration architect and an Instagram account full of photos repelling off of some of the city’s more well-known buildings proves it. (Untapped Cities)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

The landmarked Long Island City Pepsi-Cola sign is now brought to you by JetBlue. (amNY)

Tuesday night was a bloody one in Queens and Brooklyn, with four unrelated shootings resulting in five homicides. Gun violence is up over 25% from last year. (Gothamist)

A report by Coalition for the Homeless shows the city’s housing plan is actually making the city’s homelessness problem worse. (Curbed)

“New Yorkers are very, very spoiled,” Mr. Toma said, seated in the driver’s seat of a black Rolls-Royce Wraith, as he waited for the club to fill. (NY Times)

Harvey Weinstein wants his rape trial moved out of New York City because of the city’s “inflammatory press coverage.” (Gothamist)

The quarter-billion-dollar overhaul of the Grand Central Shuttle has begun. (amNY)

An 11-year-old border-terrier mix and very good boy named Theo was stolen from outside a grocery store in Williamsburg on Monday night. Theo is suffering from arthritis, liver issues, tumors, and more, but one thing he won’t have to worry about is being away from home because he was reunited with his human on Wednesday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The atmosphere is “salon-like” in this “hidden gem” where women swap makeup tips and the lighting is good and there is open space. Where is this? Apparently, it’s the second-floor women’s bathroom at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. (NY Times)

The last of the pay-by-the-hour hotel to the history of the New Victory Theater, 10 seedy remnants of old Times Square you can still see today. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the ways landlords are trying to get around the new rent reform laws in order to screw you. (The Real Deal)

Legendary pizzeria Di Fara was seized by the state for owing $167k in taxes dating back to 2014. The mayor responded by saying he’s “ready to do anything I can to get them reopened.” (Grub Street)

“Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that.” -Governor Cuomo (amNY)

Mystery solved. The staff of Dean & Deluca’s says the store is so empty because they are going through a renovation, but will stay open as a coffee shop during the renovation. (Gothamist)

Lyft is partnering with GrowNYC and BMS Family Health and Wellness Centers to offer discounted rides to low-income New Yorkers in Brownsville to improve access to healthy food options at the green and farmer’s markets and Project EATS. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Andrew Herman is illustrating every Mets home game this season. (New York Cliche)

The driver whose recklessness lead to the death of cyclist Jose Alzorriz on Coney Island Avenue is facing charges of manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, vehicular assault, and reckless endangerment. Mirza Baig, 18, is one of the few drivers facing prison after killing a cyclist or pedestrian. (Streetsblog)

The city has lowered the requirements necessary to enter its affordable housing lotteries, lessening barriers that discourage undocumented immigrants from applying. (LIC Post)

There’s a GoFundMe for just about anything, including one for fired NYPD officer Daniel “Chokehold” Pantaleo. (Patch)

10 things you absolutely have to do in NYC before summer ends. (Time Out)

If you’ve ever been anywhere near Battery Park, you know the routine of ignoring the aggressive ticket sellers for trips around the Statue of Liberty. The ticket sellers are confusing at best and deceptive at worst. The city has terminated any docking permits to companies who accept tickets sold by street vendors. (Curbed)

The Fraunces Tavern, the oldest building in Manhattan, will celebrate its 300th anniversary with a party on October 1. (amNY)

The NYPD sergeant at the scene where Eric Garner was killed will not face a trial for her role in his death. Instead, Sgt. Kizzy Adonis will lose 20 vacation days. Eric Garner’s mother said the NYPD is “actively participating in an ongoing cover-up” and the police union that represents Adonis said she was “scapegoated.” (Patch)

If you go to Union Hall in Park Slope in September or October, there’s a 1/6 chance that David Cross will be performing. He’s announced 10 dates in the two months where he’ll be testing out new material on stage. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Video: Mike Chen of Strictly Dumpling takes you on a tour of his four favorite Brooklyn pizzerias. Di Fara was not on the list. (Viewing NYC)

Meet the subway’s “happiest conductor.” (Gothamist)

The mayor was a laughing stock in Iowa, but for once it wasn’t his polling numbers or debate performances. (Patch)

If you must get caught in a storm (that was me walking home from the subway last night before hosting John Trivialta at Parklife), Domino Park in Williamsburg is, at the very least, picturesque before the rain comes down. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Democrat councilman Andy King was charged by the Standards and Ethics Committee with harassment, disorderly conduct, conflict of interest violations and retaliation, from Minority Leader and Republican Steven Matteo. Specific details of the allegations were not disclosed. (amNY)

The best ice-cream sandwiches in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for August 5, 2019 – The “Subway Supervillain Has Returned” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo recommended being fired, R Kelly denied bail, how trucks became Vision Zero’s biggest violators, the best lobster rolls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruption lottery winners are the 2, 3, A, #, N and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance Jr. is reviving an investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal from the Trump Organization. The investigation will be looking into if the Trump Organization falsified business records. (NY Times)

The city’s subway supervillain was back at it and was arrested for the seventeenth time for a subway-related offense. Isaiah Thompson is the man who was pulling emergency brakes on multiple subways, causing hundreds of delays. His latest arrest was for subway surfing. (NY Times)

The ten oldest parks in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The 42nd Street Shuttle will be “modernized,” which means some temporary delays and reduction of service. How modern? That’s questionable, but at the very least the trains and platforms will be ADA compliant, widened, and the cars themselves extended from four trains to six. (Second Ave Sagas)

The legal fight over the mega-development in the Lower East Side will continue on, but what started it? A 2016 decision by the de Blasio administration to classify residential buildings over eight stories “minor modifications” to the existing developments and could bypass the land review process kicked it off. The towers planned are 1,004-feet tall, 798-feet tall, 728-feet tall, and 724-feet tall, which all seems a bit more than minor modifications. (Bowery Boogie)

Daniel Pantaleo should be fired. That’s the decision that a police administrative judge came to in a Civilian Complaint Review Board case. Will he be? That’s a decision for James O’Neill, the NYPD commissioner, who can decide “no,” despite the judge’s decision. (NY Times)

Eric Garner’s family promised large protests if Pantaleo isn’t fired. (amNY)

What’s the history of the closet-sized “POLICE” building on Lee Avenue in Williamsburg? (Untapped Cities)

The total number of jobs in the city has gone up, but the total number of hours per week is down, essentially neutralizing the job gain when it comes to wages. The city’s lower than the average number of hours per week compared to the nation is an indicator of a substantial income gap that continues to widen. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio put a freeze on new licenses for Uber, Lyft and the like in a hope to reduce the number of cars on the streets and therefore reduce traffic and pollution. He also said, “We are not here to serve the corporate titans, we are here to serve the people.” Unfortunately, the aftermath of this is that cars that have licenses are rented out, creating corporate titans on a smaller scale and further reducing the wages he was hoping to save. (Kings County Politics)

Where to get fun, non-alcoholic drinks in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health has no 100-point violations, but it does include the Greenwich Social food hall. (Patch)

The Algonquin Hotel Cat Fashion Show featured outfits from Ada Nieves, and of course, there are photos. (Untapped Cities)

Why is it that when you send a piece of mail to someone in Brooklyn, but when you send it to Queens it’s sent to a specific neighborhood? There are myths about the reason and the post office can’t be fully be blamed either. It’s a bit of a mystery. (Gothamist)

An odd opinion piece from Polly Trottenberg, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, which seems to be focused on the difficulty the DOT’s job is when they keep getting sued by NIMBYs. (Streetsblog)

The country’s only floating pool is in the Bronx. fwiw, it’s floating on the East River, not in mid-air. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio is accused of using a state election fund to help his cash-strapped presidential campaign, which is a violation of federal finance laws. Law-breaking fundraising is nothing new to de Blasio. (Patch & NY Times)

Video: The Tiffany clock in Grand Central is worth $20 million, here’s why. (Viewing NYC)

R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking charges. (amNY)

He was denied bail, is being held in Brooklyn, and his lawyer claims that he is the real victim. (NY Times)

What are the most expensive homes for sale in each borough? Come on, you know you’re curious. (Patch)

Despite what this etiquette post from Gothamist says, I disagree and say it’s perfectly fine to read text messages from someone else’s screen on the subway. (Gothamist)

Last summer the water fountains on Roosevelt Island were shut off because the water they were serving up was contaminated. There is no indication that they will be functional in 2019. Pack a water bottle. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Highlighted by the recent killing of Em Samolewicz, how did large trucks become Vision Zero’s worst offenders? (Gothamist)

We need new laws that cause much more consequence if a motorist is negligent and they kill someone, even if it wasn’t their intention.” -Mayor de Blasio, responding to a question about on WNYC’s “Ask the Mayor” (Gothamist)

It is time to stop blaming cyclists for the problems on the city’s roads. (NY Times)

There are many reasons not to swim in the lake in Prospect Park, from the signs instructing you not to swim in the lake to the blue-green algae bacteria blooms that produce deadly toxins. Someone decided to give it a try anyway and he was dragged out of the lake by the NYPD and taken for psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau asks if you see additional police to “not be alarmed” as they engage in security theater after this weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. (amNY)

Gays Against Guns took to Times Square over the weekend to push for more gun control laws. (amNY)

The five best lobster rolls in the city. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for June 13, 2019 – The “A New Subway Villain Has Emerged” Edition

The governor will sign the rent reform laws, the mayor looks to further restrict Uber and Lyft’s operations, the best veggie burger in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the city’s top ten public high schools. (Patch)

The city’s new mansion tax is hitting on July 1, and sellers are already trying to price their way out of it. (StreetEasy)

New York City has a new subway villain. On different incidents, a man threw a bag of concrete, a fire extinguisher, Christmas lights, and a shovel. (Gothamist)

10 buildings connected to NYC’s maritime past. (Untapped Cities)

The best restaurants of 2019, according to Eater’s Ryan Sutton. (Eater)

“There’s a daunting task ahead of us on this,” is an understatement by the chair of the committee overseeing the $4 billion reconstruction of the BQE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed the mannequin children strewn across the city in small cages? No Kids in Cages is responsible for the 25 protest installations across Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Outside of San Francisco, Brooklyn has the country’s most booming tech sector, growing 356% in the last ten years. (amNY)

Where to eat near the Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. (Eater)

While the Governors Island “urban camping experience” isn’t exactly camping by most stretches of the imagination with miniature cabins, 1500 thread count sheets, wifi, electricity, a spa, and room service, but it does look nice (6sqft)

In the last year, the city ensured a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers and prevented any new drivers from being added to the pool of e-hail vehicles which already makes up 29% of all cars below 60th in Manhattan. The mayor’s next restriction will be limiting the amount of time e-hail vehicles can cruise below 96th in Manhattan without a passenger. Currently, e-hail vehicles spend 41% of their time without passengers. That rate would have to drop to 31% under the coming rule, or companies would face fines or potentially have their licenses to operate revoked. (amNY)

Here is the horseshoe route for the World Pride Parade on June 30, which is expected to be the largest Pride Parade in history. (6sqft)

The DOT unveiled plans for a protected bike lane on Central Park West. The Community Board and City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal had called for a two-way bike lane, similar to Prospect Park West, but the DOT called that idea “psychologically unrealistic.” (Gothamist)

A guide to (responsibly) day drink. (The Infatuation)

I’m bullish on anything that brings more joy and delight to the city in a near-invisible fashion. See Me Tell Me is playing hide-and-seek with her art on Instagram. Right now the has under a thousand followers, but let’s see if we can’t change that. (Bedford + Bowery)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” may be the creed of the postal service, but in the city, it’s the food delivery person that follows that creed to the letter and City Comptroller Scott Stringer is adding his voice to those calling for the legalization of electric bikes with an op-ed for Streetsblog. (Streetsblog)

Take a ride on the 3rd Ave El in a film from 1955, documenting Manhattan’s last elevated subway line. (Viewing NYC)

The governor supports the rent reform bills that are working their way through the legislature and has voiced that once they’re on his desk he will sign them into law, which hasn’t always been a guarantee. (amNY)

When the rent reform bills become law, it will be the signal that the influence that New York’s real estate industry holds over the state’s politics is not untouchable. (NY Times)

Yoko Ono’s ‘The Reflection Project’ is moving into unconventional spaces in lower Manhattan, encouraging you to “rally the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.” Just don’t do it in someone else’s way. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Gem Spa on St Mark’s and Second Ave is in danger of closing. A combination of rising rents and a former employee selling cigarettes to a minor have threatened the iconic store’s 80-year existence. It’s likely the best place you can buy egg creams and fedoras and coffee and candy in the city. (Vanishing New York)

Another detainee died in the custody of the Department of Corrections two days after the death of Layleen Polanco on Rikers Island. The cause of death and name haven’t been released. (Patch)

This new IKEA robotic furniture looks right out of The Fifth Element. (6sqft)

The governor is pushing for the state to extend the statute of limitations for rape victims and change the legal definition of harassment. (Politico)

The new status symbol for performers is a Broadway residency and the latest name to make their way is Dave Chappelle. Dave Chappelle Live on Broadway will happen from July 9-13 with tickets going on same June 18th. (Gothamist)

A guide to Pride in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The House Judiciary Committee passed the bill to reauthorize and fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for about seven more decades after being publicly shamed by Jon Stewart. (Patch)

How did Jon Stewart become the voice of the ongoing victims of 9/11? (NY Times)

“It’s another entertainment show beginning with an overwrought speech of a shaken host.” The first Daily Show with Jon Stewart after the 9/11 attacks is still worth watching. (Comedy Central)

A first look at the new DUMBO library. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Drone photos and videos from high above Green-Wood Cemetery. (Gothamist)

The city’s best veggie burgers. (Grub Street)

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