The Briefly for July 24, 2019 – The “You Can Beat This Bus in A Walking Race” Edition

A tale of two kinds of fare evasion, an alligator on Staten Island, the Queens Night Market in Manhattan, the Goop of pot, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer asked the MTA board to slow down their reorganizing plan, requesting that it be thoughtful, thorough, and transparent, three words that do not describe the MTA. (Streetsblog)

The Jet Ski Invasion seems to be just about as punk rock as the East River can get, and for two hours at the end of June, controlled chaos ruled the water. (NY Times)

Want to see the Department of Sanitation’s new trash bins being field-tested? If you’re near Castle Hill in the Bronx, you can keep a lookout for them. (Bronx Times)

The city’s slowest and least reliable bus is the M14A-SBS, at a blazing speed of 4.3 mph. This is the bus is feeling the effect of the petitions and legal arguments to turn 14th St into a busway. (amNY)

If you ask the CEO of the Emerald Media Group, someone who is trying to “make pot pretty” and appears to be trying position herself the Gweneth Paltrow of pot, about privilege and incarceration rates in NYC for people of color, you should expect a goopy answer. (Bushwick Daily)

Who will have the final say over the fate of the Industry City rezoning? Councilmember Carlos Menchaca. The community board will vote, which is purely advisory, the borough president will make a recommendation, but it’s only a recommendation. From there it goes to the City Planning Commission, which can approve, strike down, or make changes, and then it goes to the City Council, which will defer to the local councilmember for approval. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

More rain, more power outages. ConEd hadn’t fully restored power from its man-made power outage on Sunday before Monday’s storm knocked out thousands of more customers’ power. (Curbed)

One of the main issues that the city has been having with heavy rain is that the sewers and grates were not built with this kind of volume in mind. Monday night’s storm dumped over three inches of water, an amount we haven’t seen since 1996. If the grates are clogged, the streets can’t drain. That was the case on the Long Island Expressway near Utopia Parkway, and it would have stayed that way if not for Daphne Youree’s work to clear the grates herself. (Gothamist)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance announced last year that he would stop prosecuting subway fare evasion due to the racial bias that came along with the arrests and arrested dropped by 96%. Meanwhile, the Manhattan DA has prosecuted 100% of the people who were caught evading fares on buses, and those people happen to have disproportionately low income and are people of color. (Streetsblog)

If the New York Times is covering it, you know the trend already crested. The Gray Lady says traditional Irish sessions, a gathering where people perform traditional Irish music, are thriving. (NY Times)

If you’re received preferential rent, described as rent below the legal maximum allowed and accounts for about a quarter of all rent-stabilized apartments, your preferential rent is now your base rent and your rent increases are limited by the Rent Guideline Boards instead of your landlord’s whims. Anything above a 1.5% increase for a one-year lease (or 2.5% for a two year) is illegal. (Gothamist)

The weather-made and ConEd-made blackouts have been devastating to restaurants. It goes beyond the loss of business during the blackouts, like equipment damaged as a result of losing power, or food spoiled by a lack of power. (Eater)

The MTA hired a contractor to handle its homeless outreach in Penn Station and Grand Central Terminal. Is anyone surprised that the MTA’s pick, Bowery Residents Committee, was slacking on the jobs, reporting false data, and regularly ignored people asking for help? A report from the state’s comptroller audit shone a spotlight on the shameful performance. (amNY)

The recount rages on between Queens Borough President Melinda Katz and Public Defender Tiffany Cabán. Cabán’s campaign has spent over $70,000 on its attorneys, while Katz has spent a total of $0 because hers are being provided by the Queens Democratic Party. How does this seem remotely fair? Blame a loophole in the state’s election laws. (Gothamist)

Will the Queens Night Market retain its name when it opens an output in Manhattan? (Time Out)

Pity the real estate developer who might not “break-even” on their plan to build a 105,000 square foot underground gym at the Atlantic Yards. The plan was postponed by the site’s board of directors who are investigating why an environmental impact study was not conducted. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

They won’t be able to legally drink for another six years, but Control the Sound is already playing bars and opening for Questlove. (Bedford + Bowery)

Okay, here are some answers about drinking alcohol on the city’s beaches. Here’s a hint: don’t make it obvious if you won’t want a fine. (amNY)

How to spend 10 hours in the Rockaways. (Brooklyn Based)

The 16th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets in 2019 was 17-year-old Alex Cordero on Castleton Ave on Staten Island. (Streetsblog)

The 17th cyclist killed by a driver was being withheld, but they were killed on McGuinness Blvd in Williamsburg. There were a total of 10 cyclists killed by drivers in 2018. (Gothamist)

An oral history of Margot Gayle, an author, city councilmember, activist, and preservationist. (GVSHP)

The Fraunces Tavern unveiled a new exhibition, celebrating the 300 years of history that the building has witnessed and been a part of/a>. (amNY)

Traffic news rarely makes it into The Briefly, but the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade will have multiple lanes shutdown overnight every night for the next month. (Brooklyn Paper)

The president is suing New York state for its recently passed law that would allow his tax returns to be made public. (Politico)

The Bronx Zoo will be bringing back its holiday light show now that LED technology will allow the Wildlife Conservation Society to run the show without violating its core mission of conservation. (amNY)

An alligator was found in the woods of Staten Island. How the hell did it get there? (SI Live)

It’s time to up your bar game, here are the best boat bars in the city. (6sqft)

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The Briefly for July 2, 2019 – The “One of the Worst Run Big Cities in America!” Edition

The CBD ban is kind-of in effect, the 14th St busway lawsuit gets pushback, the best lunch spots in Midtown East, the Seamless controversy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Start putting your July 4th travel plans together, even if you’re not planning on leaving the city, because subways, streets, buses, and ferries will all be affected by holiday changes. (Curbed)

Congrats to presidential candidate and sometimes-in-NYC mayor Bill de Blasio. New York City is one of the worst run big cities in America! (Patch)

After the Shalimar Diner closed in November, a Facebook group called “Save the Shalimar Diner” wanted to… you know, save the Shalimar Diner. Cue 1986 Met Lenny Dykstra, who is (kind of) saving it by moving the whole thing to Long Island. (Untapped Cities)

Construction debris fell from the 12th story of a nearby apartment building still being finished through the roof of Mission Delores, the popular Park Slope bar, on Sunday, seriously injuring a woman who was in the bar. Mission Delores is closed until further notice and the woman who was struck is breathing with the assistance of a tube at Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. (Eater)

8 new outdoor art installations for July. (Untapped Cities)

Dante de Blasio wrote an op-ed in today’s USA Today about “the talk” his father had with him about dealing with the police that was mentioned in last week’s presidential primary debate. The head of the Police Benevolent Associaton called the mayor’s remarks “shameful.” (USA Today)

Eater wanted to know if L&B Spumoni Garden is still good. Turns out it is! (Eater)

The city is nearly doubling its monetary support for the LGBT community with funding for Trans Equity Programs, LGBT community services, and LGBT inclusive curriculums in public schools. (6sqft)

Here’s what you need to know about the Grub Hub/Seamless website buying controversy that erupted last week. Grub Hub has been finding new and creative ways to rip off local restaurants, including registering fake websites in their names and tricking customers. (Grub Street)

Playing ping-pong on the subway. Fun idea or public nuisance? (Gothamist)

The president doesn’t seem to know Letitia James’s name, but he certainly knows he thinks she’s being used by Governor Cuomo against him. (Patch)

The count of people who’ve died in car crashes while riding bicycles is up to 15 in 2019. 29-year-old Devra Freelander was hit and killed by a 70-year-old cement truck driver in Bushwick. (Streetsblog)

The number of dead bicyclists on city streets was 10 for all of 2018, the mayor says Vision Zero, which strives to “use every tool at its disposal to improve the safety of our streets,” will still be viewed as a success this year. (Gothamist)

The opposition to the 14th Street busway has some opposition of its own. An advocacy group supporting the busway slammed the lawsuit that blocked the busway from taking effect on July 1 as classist, citing the average rider of the M14 has an income of $28,455/year and are people of color. (amNY)

Reaching-Out in Bensonhurst is a food pantry that has provided food and social service referrals to people in need for 30 years but due to a shortage of funds has had to turn away hungry families. The shortage is due to stagnant funding. They currently serve 9,800 families and are always open to donations. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you have $13 million, you can own something almost no one in NYC has: your own set of private islands. (NY Times)

The city’s ban on CBD was promised at the beginning of the year for July 1. Now that it’s July, the Department of Health claims that it is cracking down, but they won’t issues fines until October 1. (amNY)

If you’re looking for the city’s biggest asshole, you wouldn’t be wrong to start looking at whoever decided to create this $250 hot dog. (Gothamist)

What does Midtown need? How about an 800-foot tall tower right on top of Macy’s? (NY Times)

The mayor will honor the late Det. Luis Alvarez, who recently died at 53 due to 9/11-related cancer, with a key to the city. (amNY)

A former high school student was awarded nearly $60 million in damages on Monday after a Manhattan jury found the city’s Department of Education and his former teacher liable for an accident that left much of his body scarred from third-degree burns. (NY Times)

A non-NIMBY argument against City Councilmember Brad Lander’s “YIMBY Junk.” (Red Hook Star-Revue)

The days of speeding without consequence in the city is coming to an end. The city is installing 2,000 speed cameras within a quarter mile of schools, which are practically everywhere. Anyone going 10 mph over the posted speed limit will get a $50 ticket. Critics say that turning the entire city into a speed trap won’t save lives, but anyone who gets a $50 ticket in the mail will start driving differently. (NY Times)

Where to get lunch in Midtown East. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for April 18, 2019 – The “Tough Talk From A Mayor Who Can’t Back It Up” Edition

A five-alarm fire in Marine Park, poking more holes in congestion pricing, the view from Brooklyn’s tallest tower, universal rent control and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The view from the top of Brooklyn’s tallest tower is magnificent, but it’ll only be the tallest tower for a short period of time. (Curbed)

The latest hole poked in the city’s congestion pricing condom is for Bronx residents, who will not have to pay to cross the Henry Hudson Bridge. (Streets Blog)

Mayor de Blasio touts the NYC Ferry system for addressing some of New York’s “historic inequities,” despite having literally zero evidence to back up his claim. (amNY)

The mayor claims the reason for his crackdown on electric bikes has been safety, but he’s either willfully lying or he’s pathetically uninformed. Neither option is great. There were 45,775 motor vehicle collisions that resulted in injuries, 31 of those involving electric bikes and 23 of those were injuries to the rider of the bike. Zero pedestrians were killed by bikes, electric or otherwise. (Streetsblog)

The NYPD only cost the city $230 million in settlements last year. $25.4 million of that was a settlement in a federal class-action lawsuit related to the NYPD’s illegal arrest quotas, which the NYPD denies is still happening, while it is still very much happening. (Gothamist)

The mayor declared Tuesday “Jin Park Day” in honor of Harvard student Jin Park, the first undocumented Rhodes scholar in history who has been a longtime NYC resident. (Huff Post)

The 16 best French restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

The $3 billion Amazon tax subsidy is dead. Are any lawmakers daring enough to go after the film tax credit, which has given out $6.5 billion in subsidies in the last fifteen years? (Gothamist)

Take a video tour of Brooklyn… from 1949. (js4653)

How to find temporary student housing in the city. (StreetEasy)

Long Island City’s Noguchi Museum is making a 6,000 square foot expansion and opening Noguchi’s original studio building. The expansion is expected to be finished by 2021. (Curbed)

10 iconic Bushwick landmarks. None of them involve unicycles, Four Loko can structures, mustache wax, or eight people living in a two bedroom apartment. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With the Democrats in firm control of New York, tenants are seeing more protections, which may include “universal rent control.” (NY Times)

Rent control is good for cities according to a new study. The city’s welfare went up when rent control increased. The reduction of the housing supply was outweighed by the positive effect of not worrying about losing your home. (Gothamist)

A closer look at how Oregon implemented Universal Rent Control to stop a crisis of displacement and gentrification. (Curbed)

Surprise the Harry Potter fan in your life with reservations to The Wizard Brunch when it hits NYC, which recreates an experience that is close but not to an infringing level, of eating at Hogwarts. (Time Out)

Avoid spicy tuna rolls and all raw tuna for a while. The CDC and FDA flagged it as part of a recall of Salmonella-tainted tuna coming from a company in Louisiana. New York was one of 13 states affected. Go for vegetarian options. (Gothamist)

Where to get rid of your unwanted shit when doing your spring cleaning. (6sqft)

Continuing his Justice 2020 push to move away from an over-reliance of jailing people, Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez announced a softer parole policy for Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The City’s Board of Health mandatory measles vaccination was upheld in a unanimous Health Department vote. No one has been fined $1,000, but over 500 children have been vaccinated in the last week. (Gothamist)

Street vendors will take over empty subway storefronts in Corona, thanks to a partnership with the MTA announced State Senator Jessica Ramos. (Curbed)

Where to get a Passover meal in the city. (Patch)

A Brooklyn Supreme Court judge temporarily blocked a plan to build two 16-story rental buildings, the construction of the buildings is opposed by activist groups and the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Gothamist)

We are one step closer to a five-cent fee for a paper bags once the plastic bag ban is enacted. (amNY)

It took about four hours, but nearly 200 firefighters put out a five-alarm fire in Marine Park. (Bklyner)

The M14 needs to step it up before the L Project ruins your trip to Williamsburg for brunch according to Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. Maybe she didn’t say the brunch part. (amNY)

A new law will prevent ICE from making arrests inside courthouses without judicial warrants. (TIme)

Happy Easter this Sunday, that’s also the day the city’s subways and buses will rise. (amNY)

A man was arrested for trying to carry two gas cans, two bottles of lighter fluid, and two butane lighters into St. Patricks Cathedral. He claims he was just cutting through the Cathedral to Madison Ave. Dude, come on. (NY Times)

Rents in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens have hit an all-time high. Prices dropped in Williamsburg and Greenpoint, but now that Cuomo’s L Project has taken over for the L Shutdown, kiss that trend goodbye. Where is Jimmy McMillan when we need him? (StreetEasy)

Where to eat regionally inspired Mexican food in the city. (Eater)

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