The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for May 3, 2019 – The “Eternal Existential Dread of Existing As A Subway Turnstile” Edition

The “Festival of Balls,” the Summer of Hell: Part 2, Democrats are shifting NY’s legal system, an NYU Doctor tells you how to consume CBD, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you’re taking just about any train this weekend, you better check the trains because everything looks like a mess. (Subway Changes)

The city’s fatbergs are costing us $20 million a year, all because we flush wet wipes. Remembe,r only flush your three P’s. (amNY)

The “Festival of Balls” isn’t quite what you think it is. (Time Out)

We all feel this subway turnstile’s existential dread. (Viewing NYC)

The would-be subway bomber was sentenced to a ten-years in prison, but since it happened in 2009, he’s scheduled to get out of prison in a few days. (amNY)

Brooklyn’s comedy scene wouldn’t be what it is without Littlefield, which is celebrating ten years of eclectic fun this month. Here’s an interview with co-owner Julie Kim about the history and future of the Gowanus’ heart. (amNY)

The United Talmudical Academy network of Yeshivas has been cited more than 10 times for failing to turn over medical records showing if its students have been vaccinated. The schools owe over $2,400 in fines and could face an additional $10,000. The school’s new policy will expel children who don’t have the MMR vaccination. (Gothamist)

The mayor’s presidential decision is coming this month, god help us all. The best thing that he’s able to say about it is that his family hasn’t told him not to. (amNY)

The anti-de Blasio presidential train keeps on rolling. A flyer at the gym where the mayor works out accused him of not wiping down his gym equipment after he uses it and for some reason he admitted it was true. (Patch)

Who is this new villain in the city who is stealing eggs from the Prospect Park swans? (Gothamist)

The city’s CBD in food and drink ban was postponed until June but until then, here’s an interview with a doctor from NYU on the best way to consume it. (Gothamist)

Where to find “affordable” housing in NYC. (Curbed)

Is the removal of 17 stops along the 14th St and Lower East Side routes of the M14 bus elder abuse? Depends on who you ask. (Gothamist)

Get into the bathtub and eat this bubble bath. This is art, and no, it is not in Bushwick! (Time Out)

Who loves James Dolan? Literally nobody. He’s being sued by MSG’s shareholders for paying himself a $75.6 million salary and only working part-time because of the time he dedicates to his awful band, JD and the Straight Shot. Anyone with a set of ears should sue him for his band. (Gothamist)

A list of great places to eat ice cream. (Grub Street)

From the “no one asked for your support” files, Morrissey voiced his support for the city’s proposed fur-sale ban. (amNY)

With Democrats in control of the state’s Legislature, they are pushing New York’s legal system in a different direction from its historic tough stance against defendants. (NY Times)

Video from a drone flying over Governors Island. Nothing more, nothing less. (Gothamist)

A look inside the oldest house in Manhattan, with a dash of ghost hunting on the side. (NYC Lens)

Brooklyn’s most prolific developer was handed an eviction notice for its own headquarters. (The Real Deal)

It certainly seems like commuters who take trains into Penn Station are facing a sequel to 2017’s Summer of Hell. (NBC New York)

The 25 best pancakes in the city, ranked. (Grub Street)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for October 24, 2018 – The “Evict Madison Square Garden in 2023” Edition

Fact checking the Molinaro/Cuomo debate, the 2020 census problem, Amazon is opening a cashless store to Manhattan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Watch Tuesday’s debate between Governor Cuomo and Marc Molinaro. (CBS) Fact checking and five takeaways from the debate. (NY Times)

How to vote. (Special Projects)

Is it possible for New York to evict Madison Square Garden in 2023? (Gothamist)

Amazon is opening an Amazon Go store in Brookfield Place near the World Trade Center, which is Amazon’s “no cash, no checkout” stores. What could go wrong? (Tribeca Citizen)

Get ready for a wet, wet, wet Halloween. (NY Post)

The Proud Boy who threw the first punch and triggered the fight on the Upper East Side was 26-year-old Maxwell Hare. The NYPD is conducting a criminal inquiry into the SPLC designated hate group Proud Boys. (Gothamist)

11 additive buffalo wings in the city. (Eater)

As more storefronts become empty throughout the city, something will have to be done. The Small Business Jobs Saving Act was a potential solution, but despite the backing of city council, the mayor is dead set against it and he has the backing of the Real Estate Board of New York. (Gothamist)

There are still hints of the original Penn Station sprinkled throughout the nightmare that sits underground on 34th St. (Curbed)

A tour of the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s New York City. (Vanity Fair)

The 2020 census presents a problem for the city and Brooklyn’s 2.6 million people to be specific. Without proper reporting, the city won’t receive proportional funding or representation in Congress, but proper reporting could put undocumented residents in danger. This is where #MakeItCountBrooklyn comes in. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This isn’t how an ambulance is supposed to find people who need to go to the hospital. (NY Post)

The Staten Island Ferris Wheel is dead. (Curbed) If you’re looking for puns, go no further than Rachel Holliday Smith on Twitter.

Another Brooklyn College professor is in trouble for what he posted online. This time it’s Dr. Rohit Parikh, who posted an anti-Latinx screed on Facebook. Students are demanding sensitivity training and a boost in funding to latino student groups. (NY Post)

The city has granted unlimited sick leave to workers who contracted illnesses from working at Ground Zero after 9/11. (amNY)

How the 1919 “Black Sox” World Series was fixed on 73rd and Broadway. (6sqft)

If everyone who thought James Dolan was an asshole wasn’t allowed into Madison Square Garden, it would sit empty every single night. (Observer)

What happened to the fire extinguishers in subway cars? (@s_nessen)


Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.