The Briefly for February 26-27, 2021 – The “NYC Anarchy No More” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The breakfast burrito worth a wait in the cold, sexual harassment claims against Governor Cuomo, Jojo Siwa plays MSG first, and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 42˚
Possible light rain overnight.
This weekend – Low: 40˚ High: 48˚

• Turns out the Maluma concert in October isn’t MSG’s first show of the year. JoJo Siwa will play MSG on July 30. MSG will have a 10% capacity and everyone will need proof of a negative PCR test within 72 hours, not a rapid test. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

7 queer-friendly barbershops in Brooklyn. (Nick Gallagher for Brooklyn Magazine)

We’re no longer anarchists in the eyes of the federal government. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Former NYPD officer Thomas Webster was turned himself in on charges that he assaulted a Washington police officer during the January 6 insurrection. (Jonah E. Bromwich for NY Times)

The anti-Nicole Malliotakis PAC raised more than $20,000 in three weeks to help push out the freshman Republican congressmember. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

• Malliotakis says she will vote against the Covid-19 stimulus package, citing unspent money from the last relief bill. (Faraz Toor and AP for NY1)

NYC Beer Week will be virtual this year from February 28 – March 7. (Brew York)

• Moynihan Train Hall has a new photo installation, Penn Station’s Half Century, with photos form the original Penn Station from 1910 to 1963. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

• Turns out Century 21 isn’t dead. Without specifics, they announced a relaunch for later this year. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

Tracing the travels of the Frito Pie from the invention from Teresa Hernandez in New Mexico in the 1960s to New York City. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

• Video: Defunctland covers Coney Island’s history. (Defunctland)

• The MTA is trying to keep the pandemic-level of service on the C and F trains moving forward, Transport Workers Union Local 100 is fighting against them. (Jose Martinez for The City)

• The hottest slice of pizza right now is the pizza made from Gabriele Lamonaca’s kitchen in Harlem. How can you get some in your mouth? Bartering! (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

• A survey shows that after restaurants implemented the city’s optional Covid-19 surcharge, restaurant workers tips declined. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

North Brooklyn gay bars to support during the pandemic. (Billy McEntee for Greenpointers)

Cy Vance has eight years of Donald Trump’s tax returns. (Jonah E. Bromwich for NY Times)

A new variant of the Covid-19 virus is spreading in New York. Say hello to B.1.526, which is different fro the UK and South African variants. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

• Dr Howard Zucker, Commissioner of Health for New York State, defended the use of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin in state-run nursing homes early in the pandemic. (Dean Russell for The City)

Lindsey Boylan’s post about her experiences of abuse with Governor Cuomo. (Lindsey Boylan)

• Mayor de Blasio is calling for an independent investigation into the accusations of sexual harassment against Governor Cuomo. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Peter Luger filled its main dining room with wax figures from Madame Tussauds. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A definitive ranking of celebrity wax figures at Peter Luger. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

NYPD Chief Terence Monahan is retiring and taking a new role as senior adviser for public safety under newly-named “recovery czar” Lorraine Grillo. Monahan has been partially blamed for the NYPD’s response to the George Floyd protests over last summer. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Lincoln Center will be opening ten new outdoor performance and rehearsal spaces on April 7, part of their Restart Stages initiative. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

• Since its recovery, the wreckage of TWA flight 800 has been in a warehouse in Virginia, used for training plane crash investigators. It’s scheduled for destruction later this year. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

• Mayoral candidate and City Comptroller Stringer released out a detailed 27-point compendium of progressive housing goals called “Housing is a Right, Not a Privilege,” rebutting Mayor de Blasio’s approach. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

• Podcast: Maya Wiley discusses her run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

The Harlem Chocolate Factory’s Golden Brownstone chocolate bars, inspired by Harlem’s brownstones, landed on Oprah’s favorite things list. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Queens Drive-In will return on March 5 with a free screening of Coming 2 America. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

9 Brooklyn restaurants with great patios for outdoor dining. (Andrew Cotto for Brooklyn Magazine)

• Waiting in line for trendy food is back and Ryan Sutton says the line for a breakfast burrito at Ursula in Crown Heights is worth the wait, even in the winter. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 4 – 5, 2020 – The “A Real Turd of an Idea From Cuomo” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest on indoor dining, mall and gym reopenings, indoor and outdoor schooling, the rolled-up cheese sandwich, 13 to-go negronis, and more

Today – Low: 67˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 66˚ High: 81˚

What’s open and closed on Labor Day. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

62% of New Yorkers believe the worst is yet to come when it comes to Covid-19, according to a Siena College Research Institute poll. 82% believe the state will face another large outbreak in the fall. Who says New Yorkers aren’t optimistic? Apparently New Yorkers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The bonkers story of Gennaro Brooks-Church and Loretta Gendville, the eco-yogi slumlords of Brooklyn. (Bridget Read for The Cut)

A rolled-up cheese sandwich, a cup o noodles, Pop-Tarts, and the other Bushwick-esque foods being offered by bars in, yes, Bushwick. (Jackson Schroeder for Bushwick Daily)

A year ago, the city’s jobless rate was at 4.3%. This year unemployment is sitting at 20%. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The first statue of historical women in Central Park was unveiled, Women’s Rights Pioneers Monument, featuring Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A Ford Taurus drove into a group of protesters on Thursday night in Times Square, injuring multiple people protesting the killing of Daniel Prude. The NYPD declined to say if the driver had been arrested. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The New York City public school system’s reopening will be delayed, with “instructional transition and orientation” starting remotely on September 16th and in-person learning pushed back to September 21st. (Sophia Chang, Jen Chung, and Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

“We’re trying to move heaven and earth to try to get buses in place by the first day of school.” How is it possible that the city has had the entire summer to get ready for schools to open and it’s not a given that the city’s children will have buses to bring them to school. According to the executive director of pupil transportation, “it’s really a day-to-day scenario.” (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The City Council met to hear concerns about Mayor de Blasio’s school opening plans. 140 people spoke, not one of them was a Department of Education official. According to one of de Blasio’s advisors, we’ll see”a resurgence.” Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer said she allocated $12 million for ventilation system upgrades in schools and the money hasn’t been spent, despite the city claiming poverty. School starts on September 21 and in-person classes start one week later. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Success Academy, the city’s largest charter school system, is going completely remote for the remainder of 2020a first look at what Covid-19 outdoor classes will look like. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Several city school teachers are filing for injunctive relief against the city and Chancellor Richard Carranza, asking a judge to block in-person learning at the city’s public schools. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

“Since coronavirus is less likely to spread outdoors, letting all New York City schools hold class in public parks and on cordoned-off city streets, on its face, seems like a positive development. But I didn’t need to read the fine print to know that our immigrant, Black, and brown communities — the ones that have been hit hardest by the COVID-19 crisis — would get the short end of the stick. I didn’t need to know who organized and petitioned for outdoor learning to know that the “nice white parents,” a perennial force for maintaining inequities in one of the nation’s most segregated school systems, would get their way. Again.”
-Lynn Shoh, a public school teacher, I advocate for outdoor learning. But NYC’s plan for it will further privilege ‘nice white parents’ for Chalkbeat

Diddy and educational speaker Dr. Steve Perry announced on Thursday that they are opening their latest charter school, Capital Prep Bronx, which aims to provide “historically disadvantaged” students with a standout curriculum, in order to prepare them with “college and career readiness skills.” (J’na Jefferson for The Root)

J’Ouvert festivities are canceled, but that isn’t stopping the NYPD from stepping up their presence this weekend in Brooklyn. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

A look at the history of the NYPD’s computerized system CompStat and why NYPD captains want to stop its usage. (Alexander Jusdanis for Bedford + Bowery)

The NYPD’s Police Benevolent Association endorsed Donald Trump president, which was a surprise to the Guardians Association, a fraternal order of Black police officers, who called the endorsement a “lack of respect” and takes police to “a dark place.” Let’s be honest here, the NYPD endorsing Trump is as surprising as your very obviously racist uncle from Alabama telling you about his collection of knives from WWII that just so happen to be from Germany. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Bronx Country District Attorney Darcel Clark announced that she would move to dismiss more than 300 of the curfew summonses issued during protests in Mott Haven on June 4. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

In the wake of the death of Layleen Polanco, the mayor said the NYPD should not be arresting people for sex work. The mayor has no authority over what the NYPD does and does not do and it’s up to district attorneys to decide to press charges against people who have been arrested. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

There are 200 people in city jails due to technical parole violations, lower than last year’s 726, but mostly due to Governor Cuomo’s push to reduce jail populations du to Covid-19 fears. Criminal justice advocates are pushing for the number to be zero. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Does the mayor have any authority in this city? Mayor de Blasio asked community boards to voluntarily lay off some of their pad staff to help contribute to the city’s $9 billion budget shortfall. The answer from some boards was “no.” (Kevin Duggan for Brownstoner)

Add the Barclays Center to MSG as a polling site this November, making both the largest polling site in their respective boroughs. (David Gannon for 6sqft)

Noticing a whole lot more “no-fee” apartments throughout the city? Pandemic, pandemic, pandemic. Normally in August, there might be 50% of all apartments in Brooklyn and Manhattan. This year the number is closer to 75 or 85%. (Michael Kolomatsky for NY Times)

RIP Tom Seaver, the Mets’ greatest player. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

Have you received a random copy of The Epoch Times, which is also known as “garbage?” You’re not alone. The pro-Trump newspaper was suddenly delivered to people in multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods surrounding Bed Stuy. (Jessy Edwards for The Brooklyn Reader)

A look at U Thant Island, Manhattan’s smallest island that’s also off-limits to the public. Wanna go visit? U Thant! I’ll be here all weekend. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

I’ll admit this has been a lot of bad news, but here’s a palate cleanser for you. 25 quotes about New York that fill us with immeasurable pride. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Photos: Rockefeller Center’s new major sculpture installation. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Governor is allowing malls will be reopening in the city on September 9. Food courts and other eateries will remain closed and no mallrats. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Myths and secrets of the Grand Central Clock. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The city is lowering the speed limit on nine roads to 25 miles an hour, the standard speed limit on city roads. This includes parts of Riverside Drive, Flatbush Ave, Northern Blvd, Bruckner Blvd, Short Parkway Service Rd, Dahlgren Pl, Webster Ave, and Targee St. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Apartment Porn: Four outdoor spaces, a wine cellar, and a ludicrously large shower can be found in shis $6 million Park Slope brownstone.

Another portion of the Highline, The Spur, is reopening to the public this weekend (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats to Alaska and Montana for making the NY Covid-19 quarantine list. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A makeshift Breonna Taylor memorial has popped up outside St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery. (EV Grieve)

Here’s what to expect inside the city’s newly reopened gyms. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Over 60% of restaurants and bars in the state are “likely” or “somewhat likely” to permanently close by next year, according to a New York State Restaurant Association survey of 1,042 responses. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Over 300 restaurants are suing the city for $2 billion for the city’s ongoing indoor dining plan. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

What’s the latest on indoor dining from the mayor? In his ever-changing public comments about it, he’s now pivoted to saying that there will be an answer by the end fo the month. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Governor Cuomo has a real turd of an idea. According to the governor, indoor dining could resume in NYC if the NYPD enforces compliance of regulations. Maybe he doesn’t remember why the NYPD was pulled from enforcing social distancing in the first place? It looks like an NYPD officer not wearing a mask properly with his knee on the neck of a person of color on the sidewalk. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Eater is keeping a running list of restaurants that have permanently closed. (Eater)

Opposite of that list, here’s a list of new restaurants that opened in NYC. (Eater)

The 21 most in-demand NYC outdoor dining reservations. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

13 to-go Negronis you can grab today. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for February 27, 2020 – The “Who is the Most Powerful Person in New York City?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Staten Island’s rebellion against speed cameras, the F train is headed for construction, the Gowanus Canal cleanup, eating in Mott Haven, and more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 43˚
Light rain in the morning.

Central Park has a turtle problem. The red-eared slider turtle, technically listed as an invasive species, is having its run of Central Park and muscling out the park’s other species of turtles. How did they get there? They’re usually pets who are abandoned in the park because they’ve grown to an unmanageable size, or their humans weren’t ready for a potentially 50+ year commitment to their new shelled friend. (Sarah Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: See life in NYC from 1911 with this colorized and restored 4K footage. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The 100 most powerful people in New York City. The mayor is #4, which seems high. No, I did not make the list as the person who runs The Briefly, maybe in 2021. (City and State)

Pedro Colon, 61, faces criminal charges after his bus hit Patience Albert, 10, and a 15-year-old boy on the corner of Wortman Avenue and Crescent Street in Brooklyn. The 15-year-old survived, Patience Albert did not. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Get ready for over a year’s worth of construction on the F train to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. The 14+ month job will also add cell service and wifi to the tunnel, so the next time you’re imprisoned by the MTA underneath the East River, you’ll also have to endure someone making a FaceTime call at the same time. Work is slated to start sometime later this year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s not time to freak out, but the coronavirus in the United States is “more of a question of exactly when this will happen” and not if, according to the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Here is how to prepare for coronavirus in NYC. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The mayor has been requesting the CDC allow New York City labs to test for coronavirus and that passengers arriving in NYC be screened for it. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

New York, as we know it, will no longer exist tomorrow. […] It’ll be the 1970’s all over again. People will get mean, the streets won’t be safe, graffiti everywhere, and movies will only cost three dollars.” -Tracey Jordan (30 Rock)

Here are NYC’s James Beard Awards semifinalists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

First Lady Chirlane McCray is considering running for Brooklyn Borough President. People of Brooklyn, I implore you to stop electing anyone in the de Blasio family into any public office in New York City. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A look back at the Depression-era shanty towns in New York City parks. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

The NYPD is investigating police union boss Ed Mullins, the head of the Sergeants Benevolent Association. Mullins, who will never be accused of making the rational move, has taken to Facebook to declare “I WILL NOT BE SILENCED BY THE THREAT OF DISCIPLINE, NOW OR EVER!” This is a man who was quoted as saying “Ferguson Missouri was a lie,” declared war on the mayor, NYPD officers should stand “shoulder-to-shoulder” with ICE and the list goes on. The investigation is to see if his views undermine his capacity as a sergeant, where he earns a salary of $133,524. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

State Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron upheld an August 2019 ruling that four towers planned for the Lower East Side Two Bridges development cannot move forward. The ruling says the land-review process was illegally bypassed and that 2,775 new apartments and 2.5 million square feet of new space does not qualify as “minor modifications.” (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The MTA announced 1,800 planned job cuts on Wednesday, but hasn’t said where they are coming from or if they are part of the 2,700 job cuts announced in the summer. The agency is hoping to close the projected billion dollar plus deficit projected by 2023. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Harvey Weinstein may never see the inside of Rikers Island to avoid “another Epstein incident.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A look back on when Mayor Bloomberg wanted poor people to drink less soda. (Arthur Delaney for HuffPost)

Maybe Mayor Bloomberg should never have uttered “we treated our teachers the right way” during this week’s Democratic debate, because NYC’s teachers have the receipts. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Amazon continues to rent buildings across the city, this time it’s a 300,000 square foot space in Middle Village, taking over the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s former space. (Bill Parry for amNewYork Metro)

The Trump administration can withhold millions of dollars in law enforcement grants from so-called sanctuary jurisdictions that refuse to cooperate with immigration authorities, according to a ruling issued on Wednesday from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan, a break from three previous court rulings. NYC received about $4 million a year in law enforcement grants. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The City Council will consider a package of bills aimed at limiting how much food delivery apps like GrubHub and Seamless can charge restaurants. (Jeffery C. Mays and David Yaffe-Bellany for NY Times)

Staging a Broadway should is tough, staging a Broadway show in Madison Square Garden for 18,000 students is tougher. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Staten Islanders have been wrapping yellow ribbons around utility poles to indicate the presence of speed cameras. The argument of the Facebook group behind the effort is that the speed cameras are nothing more than a money grab from the city. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Most elected officials in Staten Island won’t be participating in the island’s St. Patrick’s Day parade because the parade’s organizers will not allow Staten Island’s largest LGBT to march. Republican State Assemblymembers Nicole Malliotakis and Mike Reilly have announced they will be marching, perhaps making the political decision that Staten Islanders hate the LGBT community more than they hate bigotry in general. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Here’s how the Gowanus Canal clean-up will proceed. (Pardon Me for Asking)

Where to eat in Mott Haven. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Camila for today’s featured photo!