The Briefly for July 16, 2019 – The “No One Knows What Caused the Blackout” Edition

ConEd is not untouchable, the Queens DA race is giving Bush v Gore vibes, the best restaurants in the East Village, the ice cream wars of Dumbo have begun, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Deep below the Flatiron Building, there’s an unused coal-fueled power plant that pre-dates the building’s steam systems. You probably will never get a personal tour of it, so experiencing it through this photo gallery is the closest you’ll get. (Untapped Cities)

The pizza wars of Dumbo continue on, but the ice cream war between Ample Hills and the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory are only just beginning. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Want to prepare for the next (inevitable) blackout? Here’s a list of six things you can do to get yourself ready. (Curbed)

Why are so many of the escalators in the new Q train subway stations broken so often? Don’t ask the MTA, because they can’t figure it out. (amNY)

Put ConEd down in the same category as the MTA, because they can’t seem to get their story straight about what caused this blackout. (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo appears to be sick of ConEd’s shit between this outage, the fire in Astoria that lit the sky, and transformer fires in Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, and he’s open to replacing them. (Gothamist)

How has ConEd responded to this massive outage? By making a public statement that the heat this week could cause more outages. Lovely. (Huff Post)

The cost of the blackout was $3.5 on Broadway alone, with 26 of 30 possible performances being canceled. Saturday in July is Broadway’s most popular night in the most popular month. (NY Times)

A brief history of blackouts in New York City. (amNY)

The NYPD won’t share details about an off-duty Queens cop who was arrested on charges of false imprisonment and assault, calling it a “confidential investigation” while flagrantly showing the NYPD’s “fundamental and pervasive lack of transparency,” as cited in a report earlier this year. (Gothamist)

From romantic to the club to sporty to outdoors: where to go for date night in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

Staten Island politicians are urging the governor to start a “microtransit” pilot program to expand transit options throughout the city’s largest borough. Microtransit refers to buses and not alternative modes of transportation, as Staten Island remains a borough without any bike lanes. (Curbed)

With Jeff Bezos buying a Manhattan apartment, protestors of Amazon have a new target to make their voices heard. (Patch)

It seemed the public call for volunteers worked, the Giglio Lift went off without a hitch last weekend, which is the largest of the lifts during Williamsburg’s Giglio Feast. The feast continues through the weekend with more lifts on Wednesday and Sunday nights. (Gothamist)

There is a fight for survival happening all around us, as invasive species are threatening the city’s flora. The problem is only a biodiversity one, but fighting invasive bugs and plants can be costly. The treatment and removal of ash trees due to a beetle infestation will cost the city nearly $10 million over three years. (amNY)

What’s the latest on the Mandarin Duck? He seems to have left the city a few months ago and we should expect him back after the summer. Ducks molt in the summer and while they’re flightless they look for safer and more private bodies of water. (Gothamist)

Residents of the financial district are trying to get the city to pump the brakes before construction begins on the last building in the World Trade Center in an attempt to keep the project selection process fair and to ensure the neighborhood benefits from another massive construction project. (amNY)

Photos from the Queens DA primary recount is giving off major Bush v Gore vibes. (NY Times)

The next expansions of CitiBike’s coverage will be painfully slow. The current roll-out will take until 2023– the service’s decade anniversary– to complete. (Streetsblog)

The statue outside of the Museum of Natural History of Teddy Roosevelt atop a horse, flanked by an African-American and a Native American was one of the monuments the city was reconsidered in 2017. The statue has attracted negative attention for Roosevelt’s racist views and statements about Native Americans and Africans and has been the target of protest multiple times since installation in 1940. The museum is leaning into controversy by highlighting the criticism of the statue and of the museum’s history to complicate and contextualize without glorification. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in the East Village. (The infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 25, 2019 – The “Next Neighborhood to be Gentrified” Edition

Central Park has a new hot bird, the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, the Gandalf of Greenpoint, the man caught kicking a woman in the head arrested, and more in today’s daily NYC news brief.

Bad news for you if you’re on one of the seven subway lines with late night closures and service changes this week. (Subway Changes)

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire was 108 years ago today. (The Forward)

A look at 100 years of progress for women in New York’s political positions of power. (NY Times)

Eight monuments dedicated to real women. (Untapped Cities)

Is Brownsville going to be the next target for gentrification? The National Community Reinvestment Coalition’s “Shifting Neighborhood” report says it’s already begun. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Turns out Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick aren’t great as neighbors. (NY Post)

DUMBO’s cobblestone streets are disappearing. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Forget the hot Mandarin Duck, this season’s new hot bird is the Central Park Great Blue Heron. (Gothamist)

Yeah, birds are cool but how about the rise in the population of seals? (Viewing NYC)

The Gandalf of Greenpoint is the subway wizard we need. (Bedford + Bowery)

What constitutes a museum? Does a collection of 100 mugshots displayed in a Prospect Heights apartment count? (Gothamist)

Eat in Greenpoint like you’re Polish. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Sacred Sites Open House weekend is on May 18 and 19 if you’ve been looking to get a look behind the scenes of the city’s houses of worship. (amNY)

The man who was allegedly shown kicking an elderly woman in the head on the subway was arrested. He claims the old woman threatened to stab him, his wife, and his daughter and that’s why he kicked her in the face. (NY Post)

The prosecutor supervising Michael Cohen’s case is leaving his job in April. (Politico)

Remember last week’s proposal to put a bike lane on the Verrazzano Bridge? It’s dead. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A bunch of buzzkill doctors issued a joint statement opposing marijuana legalization in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Delaware. (NY Post)

MTA Unveils New Designated Seating For Commuters Who Look Like They’re About To Snap” (The Onion)

People in East Flatbush are so comfortable with the low crime rates in their neighborhood they are leaving their cars unlocked, causing an uptick in crime. *shakes head* (Bklyner)

The house belonging to Michael Corleone in ‘The Godfather’ is for sale. Perhaps you’d like to make them an offer they can’t refure? (NY Post)

Better get your Zyrtec, Claritin, and whatever else you can think of now. This year’s allergy season is going to be hell. (Patch)

The city’s trash panda population are getting more and more brazen with every passing day. This time they claimed ownership of the A train tracks in Queens. (Patch)

Despite saying the death of the Amazon deal has been “talked to death,” the governor couldn’t help but talk about it even more, saying the opposing politicians engaged in a “form of corruption.” (28.2% of our readers said they blame Cuomo and de Blasio for the collapse of the deal) (NY Post)

The Guggenheim will no longer accept money from the Sackler family, the family who profited heavily from the opioid crisis. It follows the Tate and the British National Portrait Gallery. (NY Times)

Don’t call for robocall scams this tax season. Actually, don’t answer your phone until the fall. (Viewing NYC)

HUD Administrator Lynne Patton continued her tour of NYCHA facilities, finally hitting Staten Island, where she said the development was “inhumane” and a “humanitarian crisis.” (NY Post)

If you rent an apartment, do you have a right to a key? As keyless systems are on the rise, some tenants don’t have keys to their homes. (NY Times)

How bad is Amtrak service at Penn Station? How about a maintenance train derailed over the weekend. (NY Post)

A man wearing only a shirt (the full Donald Duck”) was shot by the NYPD in Queens after setting a car on fire outside a police precint. He was arrested and is expected to survive. (NY Times)

A goat escaped a slaughterhouse in the Bronx. Seeking asylum, the goat found sanctuary at a farm upstate, and that’s not a euphemism. (NY Post)

Say hello to four of the city’s newest restaurants. (amNY)

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The Briefly for March 20, 2019 – The “The Bronx is the Sickest Borough” Edition

Manhattan’s IKEA has an opening date, the 7 train continues to crumble, a history of farm animals on the lamb, a car crash in Times Square, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

11 suggestions of where to go in Queens once it isn’t miserable outside. (QNS)

The Underbelly Project documented a night of literal underground art. Somewhere in the subways is an abandoned tunnel full of art created in one night. (Untapped Cities)

When The Met decided to give up its pay-what-you-wish admission for $25, it also agreed to share $2.8 million of the revenue with over 175 cultural institutions across the city. (6sqft)

People in the Bronx are the sickest in all of New York state. Sick as in ill, not sick as in “siiiiick skateboard, bro! Let’s go drink some SoBe” (Patch)

Cast in point. The Bronx is better than the rest of the city and state… at getting chlamydia. The three counties with the highest infection rates in the state are the Bronx, Manhattan, and then Brooklyn. (Patch)

How Orwashers has made the most legendary bread in the city for over a century. (Food Insider)

15 architects whose work shaped the look of historic Brooklyn. (Brownstoner)

FLÄRKEN! The Upper East Side’s IKEA opens on April 15. (6sqft)

Meet Charlie, the Golden Retriever who thinks he’s the mayor of the Upper West Side. What’s his stance on congestion pricing? (West Side Rag)

To all the young geniuses breaking into this building” (EV Grieve)

The case of Jeffrey Blount, the Parks Department employee who resigned in exchange for the city not telling his future employers that he was fired for threatening the jobs of multiple women to pressure them into having sex with him, is one example of how the city enables abusers to get away with their actions. (Jezebel)

So what’s with his gun case mounted to the wall on the subway platform? (Gothamist) http://gothamist.com/2019/03/19/gun_case_subway.php

Did you know it’s legal in New York for medical students to conduct a nonconsensual pelvic exam on an unconscious patient? The state’s legislature is looking to change that. (Gothamist) http://gothamist.com/2019/03/19/pelvic_exam_bill_ny.php

Only 12 of 803 students admitted to Bronx Science for the fall of 2019 are black. (Welcome2TheBronx) https://www.welcome2thebronx.com/2019/03/19/only-12-out-of-803-students-admitted-to-bronx-science-for-fall-2019-are-black/

Mostly Motzart announced this summer’s festival and will finally bring “The Magic Flute” to the city. (NY Times)

Cobble Hill came to a standstill on Tuesday morning while the NYPD stood off with a man who barricaded himself in his apartment with a baseball bat and what was believed to be a gun. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Central Park mandarin duck, and all of the city’s wildlife, is for everyone. Don’t harass them. (New York Cliche)

American Woodcocks, the Eastern Phoebe, American Robins, Blue Jays, and more. How to spot birds in the city during the spring migration. (amNY)

This year’s flu was a mild one, but the season ain’t over yet. (amNY)

Kushner Companies is illegally operating nine apartment buildings in the East Village and Williamsburg, according to an investigation by City Council member Ritchie Torres and watchdog group Housing Rights Initiative. (Curbed)

The 7 train just won’t stop crumbling. (Gothamist)

In honor of the cow that got loose in the Bronx, a brief history of farm animals loose in the city, including a cameo by Jon Stewart. (amNY)

Two people were injured when a car hit a concrete barrier in Times Square on Tuesday morning. (NY Post)

Would the Financial District be better off without cars? The Financial District Neighborhood Association is calling for a slow street” pilot from City Hall to Pearl Street. (Curbed)

The owners of the Vessel have reversed course when it comes to owning any photos you take while visiting. (NY Times)

The Governor will sign legislation adding hundreds of new speed cameras near schools across the city. The bill leaves the cameras active for a longer period of the day and widens the area around schools cameras can be placed, among other reforms. (Brooklyn Paper)

Ranking the city’s most notable mob funerals. (NY Post)

“Do Both” is the mashup of a TED Talk and burlesque show created by a Ph.D that’s expanding to New York this weekend. No, it’s not happening in Bushwick. (Sex with Timaree)

The best bars for singles who are ready to mingle. (Thrillist)

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