The Briefly for June 13, 2019 – The “A New Subway Villain Has Emerged” Edition

The governor will sign the rent reform laws, the mayor looks to further restrict Uber and Lyft’s operations, the best veggie burger in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the city’s top ten public high schools. (Patch)

The city’s new mansion tax is hitting on July 1, and sellers are already trying to price their way out of it. (StreetEasy)

New York City has a new subway villain. On different incidents, a man threw a bag of concrete, a fire extinguisher, Christmas lights, and a shovel. (Gothamist)

10 buildings connected to NYC’s maritime past. (Untapped Cities)

The best restaurants of 2019, according to Eater’s Ryan Sutton. (Eater)

“There’s a daunting task ahead of us on this,” is an understatement by the chair of the committee overseeing the $4 billion reconstruction of the BQE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed the mannequin children strewn across the city in small cages? No Kids in Cages is responsible for the 25 protest installations across Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Outside of San Francisco, Brooklyn has the country’s most booming tech sector, growing 356% in the last ten years. (amNY)

Where to eat near the Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. (Eater)

While the Governors Island “urban camping experience” isn’t exactly camping by most stretches of the imagination with miniature cabins, 1500 thread count sheets, wifi, electricity, a spa, and room service, but it does look nice (6sqft)

In the last year, the city ensured a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers and prevented any new drivers from being added to the pool of e-hail vehicles which already makes up 29% of all cars below 60th in Manhattan. The mayor’s next restriction will be limiting the amount of time e-hail vehicles can cruise below 96th in Manhattan without a passenger. Currently, e-hail vehicles spend 41% of their time without passengers. That rate would have to drop to 31% under the coming rule, or companies would face fines or potentially have their licenses to operate revoked. (amNY)

Here is the horseshoe route for the World Pride Parade on June 30, which is expected to be the largest Pride Parade in history. (6sqft)

The DOT unveiled plans for a protected bike lane on Central Park West. The Community Board and City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal had called for a two-way bike lane, similar to Prospect Park West, but the DOT called that idea “psychologically unrealistic.” (Gothamist)

A guide to (responsibly) day drink. (The Infatuation)

I’m bullish on anything that brings more joy and delight to the city in a near-invisible fashion. See Me Tell Me is playing hide-and-seek with her art on Instagram. Right now the has under a thousand followers, but let’s see if we can’t change that. (Bedford + Bowery)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” may be the creed of the postal service, but in the city, it’s the food delivery person that follows that creed to the letter and City Comptroller Scott Stringer is adding his voice to those calling for the legalization of electric bikes with an op-ed for Streetsblog. (Streetsblog)

Take a ride on the 3rd Ave El in a film from 1955, documenting Manhattan’s last elevated subway line. (Viewing NYC)

The governor supports the rent reform bills that are working their way through the legislature and has voiced that once they’re on his desk he will sign them into law, which hasn’t always been a guarantee. (amNY)

When the rent reform bills become law, it will be the signal that the influence that New York’s real estate industry holds over the state’s politics is not untouchable. (NY Times)

Yoko Ono’s ‘The Reflection Project’ is moving into unconventional spaces in lower Manhattan, encouraging you to “rally the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.” Just don’t do it in someone else’s way. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Gem Spa on St Mark’s and Second Ave is in danger of closing. A combination of rising rents and a former employee selling cigarettes to a minor have threatened the iconic store’s 80-year existence. It’s likely the best place you can buy egg creams and fedoras and coffee and candy in the city. (Vanishing New York)

Another detainee died in the custody of the Department of Corrections two days after the death of Layleen Polanco on Rikers Island. The cause of death and name haven’t been released. (Patch)

This new IKEA robotic furniture looks right out of The Fifth Element. (6sqft)

The governor is pushing for the state to extend the statute of limitations for rape victims and change the legal definition of harassment. (Politico)

The new status symbol for performers is a Broadway residency and the latest name to make their way is Dave Chappelle. Dave Chappelle Live on Broadway will happen from July 9-13 with tickets going on same June 18th. (Gothamist)

A guide to Pride in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The House Judiciary Committee passed the bill to reauthorize and fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for about seven more decades after being publicly shamed by Jon Stewart. (Patch)

How did Jon Stewart become the voice of the ongoing victims of 9/11? (NY Times)

“It’s another entertainment show beginning with an overwrought speech of a shaken host.” The first Daily Show with Jon Stewart after the 9/11 attacks is still worth watching. (Comedy Central)

A first look at the new DUMBO library. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Drone photos and videos from high above Green-Wood Cemetery. (Gothamist)

The city’s best veggie burgers. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for April 3, 2019 – The “Ghosting Capital of the World” Edition

The plastic bag ban may birth a paper bag fee, New Yorkers disapprove of congestion pricing, Irving Plaza will temporarily close, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

Bay Ridge’s greatest Italian hero is vegan? Sacrilege! (Eater)

With the eventual plastic bag ban taking place next year, the city is also considering a $0.05 fee for paper bags to benefit the NYC Environmental Protection Fund and go towards giving low-income New Yorkers and the elderly reusable bags for free. (Gothamist)

New York City is the capital of ghosting. 41% of New Yorkers say they’ve been ghosted, higher than any of the other 48 cities surveyed. (Time Out)

The Zagat guide book is coming back for New York City and your vote matters, much like participatory budgeting. You voted for participatory budgeting, right? (NY Times)

Here’s how the new mansion tax will affect luxury real estate. (Curbed)

The 10 best spots for plant classes. (6sqft)

We’re #1! #1 in the highest chunk of our paychecks that go towards taxes. (Patch)

Chanel Lewis is guilty of the 2016 killing of Karina Vetrano. It was Lewis’s second trial. (Gothamist)

Yesterday was one of six Gender Pay Gap days, and in New York, the gap has only gotten worse. (Gothamist)

The Tony Luke’s Philly cheesesteak has arrived in New York. Is it any good? (Grub Street)

So maybe escape rooms are dangerous if you, you know, can’t actually escape? (Gothamist)

Tracy Morgan got a key to Brooklyn, so what did he do with it? (amNY)

Governor Cuomo got an 11.7% raise this year and will get a 12.5% raise next year and an additional 11% in 2021. Not a bad job to have. (NY Post)

There’s a new chairman and CEO of the MTA, but it’s a little weird the state approved Pat Foye for the job on Monday morning at 2am. (Gothamist)

Governors Island’s 2019 season starts in a month and will have expanded hours and an additional ferry from Manhattan. (Curbed)

The Regional Planning Association has a suggestion to reduce traffic on the section of the BQE that needs repairs: reduce the number of lanes. (Curbed)

Missing from the state’s budget? No, not legal weed. No, not a pied-à-terre tax. No, not a ban on bump stocks. No, not increased oversight. Electric scooters. (Gothamist)

A Quinnipiac University poll shows that 54% of New Yorkers are against congestion pricing. The opposition is highest in the Bronx, where 62% disagree with the passing of the new rules. (NY State of Politics)

Also in the poll is that 57% of those surveyed favor changing admissions to the city’s specialized high schools. (NY Post)

Three alleged MS-13 members have been indicted on murder charges for the shooting death of a man on the 7 train platform on February 3. (Jackson Heights Post)

If you’ve ever stepped into the wrong car assuming it was your Lyft or Uber, you’re not alone. After the death of Samantha L. Josephson, who stepped into the wrong car in South Carolina, City council Speaker Corey Johnson says a bill requiring all for-hire drivers to have illuminated signs in their windows makes sense for NYC. (NY Post)

What’s behind the spike in murders in Brooklyn? (NY Times)

We’re just about to get Webster Hall back and now Irving Plaza announced it will close for eight months later this year for renovations. (BrooklynVegan)

The NYPD’s Inspector General’s Office recommended 42 reforms in a report. Of the 42, six have been implemented, 16 have been outright rejected and the rest sit in limbo. Must be nice to make your own rules. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has suspended the proposed cuts to the FDNY, agreeing to meet with the department and unions to figure out a new deal. (NY Post)

Reports of rapes in the city have seen a slight decrease since last year, the second decrease in the last 18 months. Before December of 2018, the last time reported rapes had decreased was August 2017. (Patch)

The state budget called for a reduction of Special Olympics funding by $50,000, but after the federal government pulled all of its funding the state has reversed its decision. (NY State of Politics)

Where to eat and drink with your human (when you’re a dog). (Thrillist)

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