The Briefly for October 9, 2019 – The “I Hope Someone Burns It Down” Edition

Alec Baldwin was scammed and the mayor is taking action, $10 million of speeding tickets in Queens, Brooklyn’s best fried chicken sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The pre-Yom Kippur Jewish tradition of “transferring” your sins to a live chicken by swinging it over your head is called kaporos. It’s a barbaric and disgusting tradition that kills thousands of chickens in the streets of Crown Heights. You’ll find people saying if you oppose the tradition you’re anti-Semitic or you’re doing the same thing to the Jewish community that Russia or Germany did by callnig for an end to the tradition. Public streets are not the place for slaughtering animals in 2019. (Gothamist)

The 2019 Miss Subways has been crowned. Congratulations are in order to Ms. Dylan Greenberg, this year’s Miss Subways. (NY Times)

One of this year’s election questions is about ranked-choice voting, here’s an explainer on what it is and a little bit on why it’s a good thing. (amNY)

A community hearing about a homeless shelter in Glendale, Queens started with a moment of silence for the homeless men murdered in Chinatown and then quickly devolved into comments like “I hope someone burns it down,” and “They should be locked away forever.” (Gothamist)

Today’s the day for all working New Yorkers have to have completed sexual harassment training at work. The law was passing in April and gave all New York state employers about six months to have it done. The state senate hasn’t had their training yet. (Politico)

The city revitalized 54-acres of wetlands on Staten Island, with the goal for the first phase being 69 acres. Nice. (Curbed)

Video: A look at the history of tattoos in NYC, which were illegal for nearly 40 years. (Viewing NYC)

The most expensive apartment in the Bronx is on sale for $4.6 Million. (Welcome2TheBronx)

NYC has seen its first vaping death. (Patch)

It’s not only mind-boggling that there are 32 pairs of bus stops less than 260 feet away from each other, but it slows down the routes to have stops that close. (6sqft)

Drivers in Queens racked up over $10 million in speed camera violations in six weeks of the program giving $50 tickets for going more than 10 miles an hour over the speed limit in a school zone. Queens accounts for more than 1/3 of the $28 million total. (LIC Post)

Skunks are common in the city, but for the first time, one has been spotted in Prospect Park. They’re harmless as long as you don’t threaten them, so welcome to our new fuzzy and sometimes stinky park-dwellers. (Patch)

Take a ride in the new Cash Cab. (amNY)

The company operating floating billboards has finally left the city, after the city and state both passed laws making their type of floating billboards illegal. (Patch)

In the dumbest series of events that lead to something good, Alec Baldwin was scammed by the guys selling tickets to boat tours of the Statue of Liberty around Battery Park and Tuesday the mayor said the city will crack down on this type of ticketing scam. If you want to go to the statue, tickets are sold in front of Castle Clinton and on the Statue Cruises website. (NY Times)

What kind of punishment would you assume killing a 10-year-old with a car while driving without a license carries? If you said “a misdemeanor with a maximum punishment of 30 days in jail,” you’re right. (Streetsblog)

Netflix is turning Broadway’s Belasco Theatre into a movie theater to show Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman for the month of November. (Time Out)

A review of Mario Batali’s biggest NYC restaurants in a post-Batali world. (Eater)

The 10 best fried chicken sandwiches in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Briefly for March 7, 2019 – The “Mayor de Blasio Unsuccessfully PEGs the City Budget” Edition

The NYPL is getting a makeover, 248 city buses got graded and it wasn’t pretty, Industry City is starting to sound a lot like Amazon, where do the RHONY live, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Control over the MTA has always been central in the political city vs state fight. Governor Cuomo put his chips on the table by clearly stating if the city wants control of the MTA, they’ll lose the $10 billion the state contributes to the MTA. (amNY)

The New York Public Library is getting a $317 million makeover. (Curbed)

New York really tries hard to hide police misconduct records from the public. The Legal Aid Society created a searchable database of 2,300 lawsuits filed against the city since 2015. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio instituted a Program to Eliminate the Gap (PEG) for the city’s budget. The PEG is meant to cut $750 million from the city’s budget. The mayor’s budget increases the budget by $3 billion and the City Council isn’t pleased. (Gotham Gazette)

How to avoid the bait and switch encroaching into more and more rent agreements. (Thrillist)

Where do the women of RHONY live? Do they live places? Let’s find out. (StreetEasy)

A one-year-old boy rode the 1 train from 96th to 34th after his caretaker suffered a medical episode and was separated from the infant. The caretaker is a family friend and the family won’t press charges. (Gothamist)

A list of all the best new things to eat in New York.(Grubstreet)

After being open since 1977 and months of speculation, Moishe’s Bake Shop on 2nd Ave has closed. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The city’s restaurants, and all restaurants, are free from Mario Batali. Batali, who has more claims of sexual harassment against him than he has crocs, has dissolved his partnership and his old partners have formed a new company without him. (NY Times)

Maybe he can make himself some pizza dough cinnamon rolls to console his sadness. (Everywhereist)

Buying? Renting? What does your numerologist say? (6sqft)

Every beat cop, sergeant and lieutenant are now equipped with body cameras. (NY Post)

George Washington brewed beer, and you don’t believe that you can see his beer recipe in the New York Public Library. (Atlas Obscura)

Residents are fighting the city’s plan to replace the Elizabeth Street Garden with a housing project. A non-profit fighting the development claims the city’s environmental study wasn’t thorough enough, which seems like a good tactic to buy time. (Curbed)

248 city bus routes received grades. Only 1 got an A. (Patch)

“We haven’t spent $850 million. We’ve only spent, by the end of June, we’ll have spent $560 million.” Chirlane McCray’s Fox 5 interview didn’t go as planned. (NY Post)

If you’re under the 7 train in Sunnyside, the sky is falling. More debris fell from the elevated track and this time it hit a moving car. (Sunnyside Post)

The guy who started the Prince Street Pizza knockoff will soon be running the 140-year-old White Horse Tavern. (Eater)

The City Council passed a bill that would allow the Department of Buildings to issue stop work orders to “reckless” developers. (QNS)

Industry City is using Amazonian-like language in expressing their disappointment about their rezoning requests. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca is threatening to kill the rezoning unless the process is delayed. (Curbed)

Watch a cop ride a seized bike past a school without wearing a helmet, lose control, crash, and walk away with a limp before abandoning the bike. (Daily News)

Rape charges were dropped against two Brooklyn cops who admittedly had sex with a teen girl while she was under arrest and handcuffed in their police van in 2017. The cops say that the sex was consensual, the woman disagrees. (NY Post)

It was a miracle on the E/F in Kew Gardens. A woman fell onto the tracks and the train couldn’t stop. She survived by lying on her back between the tracks and the train passed right over her. Don’t try this at home. (QNS)

Canarsie is not amused by the 40 ounce water bottle shaped like a 40 of malt liquor. “Get Ounced?” More like “Get Out.” (Brokelyn)

A judge ruled that the MTA must install elevators as it renovates subway stations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, no matter the cost. Unless technically impossible, it is now legally required. (Politico)

The state’s budget is full of Governor Cuomo’s non-fiscal initiatives, like making it illegal to ride in the backseat of a car without a seatbelt and closing three prisons upstate.

Is it time to install LED lights on the sidewalks to prevent pedestrians with their heads in their phones from getting ruined by vehicles? (Bowery Boogie)

The five best pancakes in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for January 9, 2019 – The “Great Pizza Recipe Caper of 2019” Edition

The mayor wants to give healthcare to all, Corey johnson wants control of the subways and buses, $26 million was saved in rent thanks to the L train shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Threats of the L train shutdown saved renters in Williamsburg over $26 million in rent. A different version of this story could say “The L train shutdown cost landlords over $26 in rent. (Metro)

“Back of a taxi” is becoming a popular birth spot, with the second baby of the year being delivered while the meter was running. (NY Post)

The second large scale project Staten Island has lost in the last few months when the developers of the Riverside Galleria withdrew their plans after facing pressure from politicians. (The Real Deal)

For now, it seems like you can get a taste of Nolita uptown. The man behind Prince Street Pizza is suing a former chef for allegedly stealing the recipe for his famous spicy pepperoni slice and bringing it to the former chef’s new restaurant Made in New York Pizza on the Upper West Side. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announce that the city will spend $100 million to provide health care for undocumented immigrants and others who cannot qualify for insurance. His vision is that the city would provide comprehensive care to everyone, including 300,000 undocumented New Yorkers. (NY Times)

The debate over Amazon’s HQ2 has unions squaring off with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’s opposition at odds over the project with the Service Employees International Union and the Building and Construction Trades Council’s support. (The Real Deal)

The best coffee shops for meetings. (The Infatuation)

Welcome to 2019: the home of New York’s worst measles outbreak in decades. (NY Post)

It’s seemed inevitable that Willits Point was headed towards mega-development, but that inevitability has loomed overhead decades. A stadium for the Mets, a mall, and now the Queensborough Football Club have laid claim to the neighborhood, despite decade-old plans for mixed-income housing. (Gothamist)

SNL’s Michael Che is putting together “A Night for NYCHA” this Friday at Irving Plaza to benefit the Fund for Public Housing, featuring Jeff Ross, Michelle Wolf and a “top secret” lineup of comedians. There is a GoFundMe page for people who can’t attend but still want to donate (amNY)

A lawsuit was dismissed that claimed that Danny Meyer sat atop a New York restaurateur illuminati-esque group which sought to pocket tips intended for their staffs. (Eater)

Whatever happened to the toxic dust the MTA claimed would make a partial L train shutdown impossible? (Gothamist)

A Bronx pedestrian was killed by a driver of a city sanitation truck who was preemptively salting Willis Avenue at E. 138th Street. The driver was suspended and is cooperating with the NYPD. (Streetsblog)

What you need to know about the city’s special election for public advocate. (Curbed)

A dog museum? A dog museum. The AKC Museum of the Dog is opening on February 8 at 101 Park Avenue, bringing paintings, prints, sculptures, porcelain figurines, displays and more to two floors, including the first exhibition “For the Love of All Things Dog.” (USA Today)

Mario Batali, famous for orange Crocs, an apology that pairs with pizza dough cinnamon rolls, and being accused of sexual misconduct, will not be facing criminal charges for two sexual assaults that allegedly took place in 2004 and 2005. (Eater)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will reveal a plan to wrestle control of the MTA’s subways and buses from the MTA within the next two months. Will he shutdown the shutdown of the shutdown? (Streetsblog)

A judge blocked Mayor de Blasio’s attempt to move carriage horses inside Central Park instead of being alongside cars on the streets. A full hearing will take place February 8. (NY Post)

Politicians can’t constitutionally block critics on official social media accounts. Looking at you State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself” Parker and City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. (Metro)

38 essential restaurants, winter edition. (Eater)

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