The Briefly for July 30, 2019 – The “Never-Ending DA Election is Going to Court” Edition

Where rents are rising and falling, the top binge drinking neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the governor changes pot possession laws, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Members of The Proud Boys, a hate group according to the SPLC, are headed to trial for rioting for their fights with antifa protestors from an Upper East Side event in October. They’be being charged with rioting rather than assault because the antifa members who were involved are not cooperating with the NYPD. (NY Times)

Dave Chang has a new restaurant in the South Street Seaport. Is Bar Wayō enough to make you want to go to the financial district or will the neighborhood continue to be I Am Legend after 6:00? (Grub Street)

The New York City Board of Elections unanimously certified the results of the full, manual recount in the race for the Democratic nomination for Queens District Attorney. Melinda Katz won the primary. (Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán and Melinda Katz’s campaigns will head to court on Wednesday to continue the June 25 Democratic primary until the bitter end. (NY Times)

Brooklyn Heights/Fort Greene and Park Slope/Carroll Gardens are the current kings of Kings County binge drinking, which also happen to be the two wealthiest districts in the borough. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Is public shaming enough to get NYC to change the name of “Negro Point,” which is a real spot on Randall’s Island? (Huff Post)

A $24 million dollar offer for his four-story building in the Upper East Side, denied. The story of one man who refuses to sell out in an attempt to preserve a neighborhood he perceives to be disappearing. (NY Times)

Hail seitan! Brooklyn is getting the first fully vegan sandwich shop in Seitan’s Helper at Precious Metal. (Bushwick Daily)

In an attempt to make the waiting experience less boring, the Empire State Building has a new gallery that is part Instagram-bait and part waiting area. (amNY)

Congressperson Yvette Clark introduced a bill that would ban the use of facial recognition technology from public housing. Face, voice, fingerprint and DNA identification tech would be banned from any housing that receives federal aid. (Curbed)

What’s in a name like Stone Street, Waverly Place, or Gold St? The hidden history behind 15 street names in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The South Bronx, Concourse Village, and Brownsville are the neighborhoods with the fastest rising rents. The biggest drops were in Maspeth (post-Amazon related?) and Borough Park. (Patch)

If you don’t know the name Sam Rudy, you know his work. His 40 years as a theater publicist included recent work on shows like Hamilton and Avenue Q. The Times interviewed him as he retires to Pennsylvania. (NY Times)

The Williamsburg Bayside Oil Depot is scheduled to be demolished. What’s that? Yes, of course, there is someone arguing that they should be saved. (6sqft)

The governor signed the bill into law that changes possession of up to two ounces of pot to a violation instead of a misdemeanor, meaning you’ll be fined instead of sent to jail. It also creates a process for records of certain charges of possession to be expunged. (Patch)

When he was 26, Carmine Cataldo thought his job running the newsstand at the Brooklyn Supreme Court was temporary. 36 years later, he’s retiring. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to the Rockaways. Start planning your weekend. (6sqft)

It’s not summer until the nutcracker vendors hit the beaches. Unfortunately, the NYPD is attempting to change that in Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

People of color were significantly underrepresented in the city’s arts organizations and city government is starting to ask them to find ways to change. (NY Times)

The president signed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund into law, providing financial support through 2090 to those injured or developed diseases due to their work after the attacks. (amNY)

Unsurprisingly, Trump made the signing of the bill about himself, continuing his history lying and exploitation of the 9/11 attacksthe city’s 18th cyclist killed by a driver. Em was doored by a driver and sent into the street where she was hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

After the killing of Em Samolewicz, here is the city’s most dangerous intersections. (Curbed)

A palate cleanser. Three baby ducks were rescued from a sewer drain in Park Slope after being spooked by a dog. The ducks are recovering at the Sean Casey Animal Rescue. (Gothamist)

Emily Waters is giving away her art on Instagram. Meet the artist who is trying to assuage the constant stress of life with delight. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd “identified a flawed connection between some of the sensors and protective relays” which caused the July 13 blackout in Manhattan. (amNY)

The best museums in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for February 7, 2019 – The “Wait, What is a Pizza Sauna?” Edition

The Public Advocate debate, the porta-potty king, a rooftop glamping sauna, the NYPD targets Waze, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest.

Watch the full Public Advocate debate or read the live blog. (NY1)

Amazon HQ2 was the common punching bag during the debate. (NY Post)

At 115 years, Maspeth’s Grant Street Bridge is ready for a makeover. (QNS)

The MTA’s 24% accessibility at subway stations should be embarrassing enough before the truth comes out about how those numbers are inflated. The subways are planned to be fully accessible by 2034 at a cost of $40 to $60 billion. (Curbed)

The BQX is taking a baby step forward. The city’s Economic Development Corporation is expected to approve a contract that will allow an environmental review. It’s only the first step of a $2.73 billion plan, which is what you might call “one full Amazon.” (Curbed)

This profile of the porta-potty king of New York City is full of crappy puns. (NY Mag)

The best bagels in Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

“Yes, I broke your window because Barack Obama was talking to me and I didn’t like what he was saying.” A perfectly understandable excuse for breaking the window of a Harlem adult shop. (Gothamist)

Lincoln Center has a new president. Henry Timms, who helped create #GivingTuesday, will leave the 92nd Street Y to take the position. (NY Times)

Releasing a banner buoyed by balloons into Grand Central Terminal is a pretty good way to make sure your protest can’t be easily removed. (Gothamist)

Waze is about to get less useful thanks to an . (NY Post)

Google to the NYPD: No thanks. (amNY)

The city is getting a pizza sauna. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The BronxCare Health System will repay sexual assault patients for illegally billing them for rape exams after settling a lawsuit by the NYAG’s office. (amNY)

The state legislature is looking to raise the prison minimum wage to $3/hour. Inmates work six hours a day, five days a week between $0.10 to $1.14/hour. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Pizza sauna not your thing? You could spend time in a sauna while glamping on the roof of a Williamsburg hotel. (Time Out)

Ever wonder how the city’s greenmarkets continue to have fresh produce in the winter? Here’s your answer. (amNY)

Is anyone surprised that the state’s police unions oppose legalizing marijuana? (NY Post)

The Astoria Boulevard N/W station will close for nine months starting in March as elevators are installed. (TimesLedger)

A look at The Pirates, an enclave of fans of of F.C. St. Pauli, a German anti-fascist soccer team. (NY Times)

8 highlights from the new Museum of the Dog. (Untapped Cities)

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