The Briefly for August 7, 2020 – The “Mess With the Bull, Get the Horns” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo gets petty, de Blasio breaks another promise, eight NYC rooftops, how to renegotiate rent, the NYPD fights the chokehold ban, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 80˚
Rain in the morning and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 71˚ High: 84˚

A guide to renegoiate your rent. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

An executive order will allow the courts to suspend eviction proceedings through September 4. It’s not a complete ban on eviction hearings, but it gives the courts leeway to suspend deadlines. (Sydney Pereira with Beth Fertig and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Do not buy a car,” says mayor who gets driven literally everywhere. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Lucky, the East Village bar that started a petition calling for Governor Cuomo to reverse his “substantial amounts of food” mandate with drink orders, had its liquor license suspended for not serving food with its drink orders. Classic petty Cuomo. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state attorney general’s office is suing to dissolve the NRA. AG Letitia James made the announcement on Thursday. Washington DC is also suing the NRA. 148 years ago the NRA was chartered in New York, giving the state the jurisdiction over it. (Danny Hakim for NY Times)

A look at another broken promise of Bill de Blasio: release a complete history of all complaints against every officer in the NYPD and how his corporate counsel made the decision not to release anything for the time being. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

NYPD unions brought a lawsuit seeking to stop a new city law that makes it a crime for police officers to use chokeholds or kneel on a suspect’s neck or back. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are over 900 NYPD officers that have refused to participate in investigations into alleged misconduct, creating an immense backlog for the Civilian Complaint Review Board. Cowards. If a private citizen doesn’t want to participate in an investigation into alleged wrongdoings on their part, they don’t seem to have a choice. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Even as its population is shrinking, the use of force against inmates at Rikers Island is at an all-time high. (Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Have you taken to indoor gardening? You’re not the only one. You might say that the hobby is… growing on New Yorkers. (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

Apartment Porn: A $3.25 million Brooklyn Heights waterfront loft. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at the opening of Rangoon, one of NYC’s strictly Burmese restaurants. (Sai Mokhtari for Gothamist)

Welcome to the neighborhood Any Thing, a new bar in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, whose bar features only distilled and/or supported spirits that are women-owned. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Something’s wrong in your rented apartment. Who should pay for repairs? (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

Dr. Oxiris Barbot is only the latest high profile woman of color to leave the de Blasio administration. She joins Deputy Mayors Lilliam Barrios Paoli and Herminia Palacio, mayoral aide Rachel Noerdlinger, his first Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett, Children’s Services Commissioner Gladys Carrion, and NYCHA Chair Shola Olatoye. Maybe it’s time to ask the question: Does the mayor have a problem with women of color? (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The Black Tap is starting up CrazyShake deliveries on Monday. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Exploring NYC’s iconic works of public art. (Untapped New York)

It’s an unremarkable building in St Louis, but it once stood as one of the pavilions at the World’s Fair in 1964. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

The world’s largest bronze gorilla sculpture, titled King Nyani by Gillie and Marc Schnatter, is coming to Hudson Yards’ Bella Abzug Park. Once installed later this month, three people will be able to fit in the gorilla’s hand. The sculpture is part of an awareness campaign to raise funds for the critically endangered gorilla species. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Next week is the peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower, which you’ll be able to see on a clear night. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Hulu’s High Fidelity series, which eschewed Chicago for Brooklyn, is canceled. (Bill Pearis for BrooklyVegan)

We have anything that you’d find at a New York bodega, turned vegan,” – Jeremy Dean, owner of the newly opened Vodega in DUMBO. I know where I’m going this weekend. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Remember gyms? Governor Cuomo says you won’t see a gym open in New York anytime soon. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

That won’t stop everyone, as some gyms like BYKlyn Cycle in Park Slope (of course, it’s Park Slope) opened a pop-up outdoor spinning studio. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything you need to know about the NYC quarantine checkpoints. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in Greenpoint. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

While the mayor didn’t come out and directly support a tax on the city’s mega-rich, he went as far as to say that he won’t cater the city’s policies around trying to lure them back. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

List: Recent restaurants and bars that closed, including Jack the Horse Tavern in Brooklyn Heights, 88 Lan Noodle in Chinatown, Fonda in the East Village, and more. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The MTA is expanding its program of putting cameras on buses to ticket drivers parked in bus lanes. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The 8 rooftops now open with the best views of NYC. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

There has been a years-long fight to grant Ezras Nashim, an all-female Orthodox volunteer emergency medical service and focus of the documentary 93 Queen, an ambulance license. They have been using their own vehicles to respond to emergencies and were denied a license last summer due to objections from the Hatzalah emergency medical service. Within the Orthodox community, modesty is a real issue, and women can be forced to make a choice between their modesty and a real medical emergency. That is a position that no one should have to be in. Women are not allowed to join the Borough Park chapter of Hatzalah, exacerbating the issue. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Are NYC schools ready to handle students and teachers? Here’s a better question: Do their HVAC systems work at all? (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

On its 100th birthday the Wonder Wheel stands silent. (John Freeman Gill for NY Times)

A guide to the city’s food halls that have reopened for outdoor dining, takeout, and delivery. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Briefly for July 19, 2020 – The “Phase Four Starts Monday” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A look at phase four, Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars, how to see the comet Neowise before it disappears, Metro-North has an awful new superhero & more

Hey! The Briefly is still a one-man hobby, and I overslept on Friday!

Phase four will start on Monday, but it’s been modified. Initially, phase four was supposed to include indoor venues, building on phase three’s indoor dining. No indoor activities are included in phase four. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The official list of what qualifies for phase four: Higher Education, Pre-K to Grade 12 Schools, Low-Risk Outdoor Arts & Entertainment, Low-Risk Indoor Arts & Entertainment, Media Production, Professional Sports Competitions With No Fans, and Malls. The indoor arts and entertainment is pertaining to museums and galleries and not seeing your favorite band play for a dozen people. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

New York City has public-drinking laws, of course, which include the regulation of open containers. Some New Yorkers have treated the city’s temporary takeout-cocktail laws as a cause for celebration, an opening of the streets. New Orleans meets Manhattan. But not me. While bars and restaurants reopen, the lines between which people get to enjoy these laws and which people do not are clearer than ever before. There are no alfresco dinner parties in the projects.
– Christian Rodriguez, Who Really Gets to Drink Outside in New York? for Eater

The rollout for Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars and restaurants was a bit shaky. There’s a new three-strike system, where noncompliance with to-go alcohol mandates or social distancing will earn an establishment up to three strikes before having its liquor license suspended, but also egregious violations could mean an immediate suspension. The new rules will mean that you’ll likely see a few small bullshit food items handed out alongside a to-go drink. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coverage of closing restaurants:

An ode to Odessa. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

What to order from Angkor before it closes on August 1. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Hunky Dory is reopening, but without tipping. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Lilia is reopening for outdoor dining in Williamsburg and there’s already a multi-week wait. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Dirt Candy is back with takeout and outdoor dining. (Scott Lynch and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Smorgasburg is coming back too, with takeout only. Does takeout exist from an outdoor tent? (Erika Adams for Eater)

Grand Central Terminal’s food hall is open again. With no possible way to participate in outdoor dining at Grand Central, is it the only place in the city with indoor dining? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

20 Michelin-starred restaurants that are open for outdoor dining. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The Bronx’s Little Italy on Arthur Avenue, aka “Piazza di Belmont” is taking over the street for most of the weekend over the summer. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

The 9 best streets for outdoor dining in NYC this summer. Glad to see Arthur Ave is at the top of this list. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

How to see the comet Neowise in the city. You’ve got about a week to try to see it before it leaves for 6,000 years. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The mayor is calling for all 1,349 curfew protesters to face charges. Curfew violations are a Class B misdemeanor and punishable with up to a $500 fine and three months in jail. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

One bad take deserves another. Here’s a bad take from Governor Cuomo, who opposes a billionaire’s tax because he says the ultra-rich will just leave New York. New York has 118 billionaires who increased their wealth by $77 billion over the four months of staying at home. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A review of Brooklyn Noosh on Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn and it’s “secret garden” for outdoor dining with a recommendation for the Flamin’ Hot Cheeto Wings. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

How to order takeout from Rao’s Italian food in East Harlem since landing one of the restaurant’s ten coveted tables is out of most of our grasp. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A fascinating question. Without food service jobs to subsidize their lives and art, what will happen to New York’s creative class? (Deepti Hajela for AP)

Metro-North now has its own extremely lame superhero. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The New York Botanical Garden is opening up on July 28. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in the West Village. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 30, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining on July 6? Not So Fast.” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor announces moving $1 billion from the NYPD’s budget, a peacock escapes the Prospect Park Zoo, Broadway stays dark, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 79˚
Possible light rain in the evening.

The mayor announced that he’s committed to redirecting $1 billion of the NYPD’s funding to other city resources. This is a move that both the police unions and police protestors are upset with. The perfect de Blasio move, creating as much anger as possible on all sides. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Brooklyn got a second Black Lives Matter street mural last week, this one outside of Borough Hall. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

“We don’t need more Black Lives Matter signs painted on streets. We need a real, true cut, and this money laundering ain’t it.” -Nelini Stamp on the mayor’s $1 billion announcement. The announcement includes the transfer of fringe benefits for school safety agents to the DOE, which move around money, which accomplishes literally nothing. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“The purpose of this article is to outline five specific, systemic, attainable reme­dies to the epidemic of police abuse.” This is from May 28, 1985. (David Swanson for Village Voice)

Maybe we won’t have indoor dining starting on July 6? We’re less than a week away from the city’s supposed start of indoor dining and the mayor says he needs to “examine closely and come to a decision in the next couple of days.” The wavering is due to the spike in Covid-19 cases nationwide, not necessarily in the city. When will a decision be made? You’d assume before July 6. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The NYPL lions, Patience and Fortitude, are wearing masks like all good New Yorkers. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An interactive map of apartment prices at each subway stop in the city, with the 2020 edition showing 36% of subway stops experiencing drops in rent. (RentHop)

How much are you supposed to tip movers? The American Moving and Storage Association suggests $25 per person, which doesn’t seem like much for NYC. Here are some things to keep in mind when calculating a tip. (Rita Cidre for StreetEasy)

Tens of thousands of New Yorkers are facing possible eviction without city, state, and federal aid. The stat’es eviction moratorium ends in August, the federal government’s regular Covid-19 assistance ends in July, creating a perfect storm for evictions. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Making the case why New Yorkers won’t actually move to the suburbs. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

With an unsure future ahead for the city’s schools, the Department of Education purchased an additional 40,000 iPads for students for summer school students, adding to the 300,000 it’s already purchased. (Reema Amin for The City)

Interview: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Black Lives Matter, representing NYC in Congress, her first two years in Congress, and more. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

We don’t have results from the June 23 primaries and elections yet, and it still may be a while until we get results. There were 765,000 absentee ballots distributed, but only 471,000 votes were cast in person, so when it comes to results we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg. (Jim Brennan for Gotham Gazette)

Broadway will be closed through at least the end of the year. All tickets through January 3 have been refunded, but there’s been no statement on a return date. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Remember how the MTA was in the process of re-designing Brooklyn’s bus systems? Forget it. The MTA says Covid-19 has forced them to put a hold on the plans and they’ll publish a revised timeline in “the next few months.” An announcement to say they’ll make an announcement about an announcement in a few months. The original plan was due at the end of the second quarter. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Will 24-hour subway service ever return? Maybe. The governor is leaving a lot of wiggle room in all of his answers. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Will offices ever go back to normal? amNY looks at the Empire State Building as a bellwether for recovery. Only 15-20% of the building’s occupants that could return have returned during phase two. (Imani Moise and Echo Wang for Reuters)

Crown Heights Caribbean spot Glady’s is shutting its doors permanently due to Covid-19. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Downtown Brooklyn Public Art + Placemaking Fund award in Brooklyn is giving grants of up to $50,000 for public art and performance projects looking to revitalize portions of Downtown Brooklyn. Applications are open through June 25, 2020. (BKLYNER)

Around the city, you’ll find flyers for someone selling flan. A look at New Yorkers who have started businesses making cooking and baking during the pandemic. (Devorah Lev-Tov for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio wants to do something about solitary confinement. He’s assembled a “working group” whose job it will be to create a plan to end solitary confinement and “punitive segregation.” (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Interview: Milton Glaser, shortly before his death, talking about a design idea to unify the city around the word “together.” (Jeremy Alias for NY Times)

13 things you didn’t know about the Woolworth Building. (Michele Cohen for 6sqft)

The city will take over more streets in the evenings to combine Open Streets and Open Restaurants to push restaurant seating into the car lanes and create pedestrian walkways down the center of the street. The streets haven’t been announced but will begin this weekend and run through Labor Day on Friday nights, and all day on Saturdays and Sundays. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The City Council unanimously passed the COVID-19 Funding Tracker Bill to establish a public database to track city spending in an attempt to provide balance for relief throughout the city. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

After the police’s violent actions against the Queer Liberation March, Washington Square Park’s statues of George Washington were splattered with red paint in protest. Washington was targeted for his ownership of slaves. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

On Saturday the Covid-19 death toll in New York was down to five, the lowest since March 15. With the United States’ cases hitting new all-time highs, will the people who left the city return and bring new cases with them? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

In a ramp-up to the weekend and lifeguards returning to beaches, food vendors have returned to Jacob Riis Beach. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A parakeet has been spotted hanging out in Tompkins Square Park. (EV Grieve)

Photos: A peacock escaped from the Prospect Park Zoo. It checked out Flatbush Ave, was chased around by the NYPD, and flew back home. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Thanks to reader Zlata for the photo of last night’s “surprise” fireworks on the East River!