The Briefly for May 14, 2019 – The “Four Billion Dollar Leaky Roof” Edition

Bill de Blasio tries to hold a rally, another yeshiva is closed, more speed cameras are coming to the city, a wallaby has a new home, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Video: How much do you love your partner? Enough to get married on the Q train? (ABC 7 NY)

It seems like a bad idea to stop paying your mortgage for five years, but that’s what legendarily stubborn Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer did with her four-story Upper West Side townhouse in protest of a tax issue. (The City)

This is your weekly warning that if you have allergies, never leave the house. This week will bring blooming flowers and misery for you while the tree and grass pollen count remains very high or high through Monday. (Patch)

The Oculus is leaking. After spending $4 billion on the building, $32 million on the skylight, and $30,000 on filling leaks with sealant, you’d think the problem would be under control. The Port Authority will replace the skylight’s rubber seal this summer. (6sqft)

The new Essex Market opened its doors, across the street from the original location. (Eater)

10 fun facts about the new Essex Market. You can’t have an opening without some fun facts! (Untapped Cities)

Video: Watch 24 hours of city transit in one minute. (Will Geary)

Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer accused of choking Eric Garner to death, faces a possible firing during his NYPD internal trial. Pantaleo’s lawyer says he did not use a chokehold and did not have his arm around Eric Garner’s throat when Garner was saying he could not breathe. The trial will last two weeks. (Patch)

With the new price of a MetroCard and no bonuses, does a value or a timed card make more sense? More often than not, even if you commute to work 5x a week, the pay per ride card is a cheaper option. (Gothamist)

Award-winning cocktails and vegan BBQ in the East Village. (Bedford + Bowery)

Mayor de Blasio attempted to create a vision of a man who was running for president by mounting a climate change rally outside of Trump Tower only to be heckled by people with “Trump 2020” and “Worst Mayor Ever” signs. The man no one wants to see run for president said that he’ll make his decision this week about if he wants to spend the next year of his life on a losing endeavor instead of his job as mayor. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio was attempting to tout the city’s New Green Deal’s impact on the Trump Organization, which will cost the company millions of dollars in fines if they don’t renovate their buildings to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030. (Splinter)

Subway maps used to be pretty cool, as evidence of this map from 1958. (Viewing NYC)

It appears that marijuana legalization in New York is on life support. (NY Times)

63% of city voters changing the SHSAT to boost diversity, with 57% willing to scrap the test altogether. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“What the hell does the ‘night mayor’ even do?” No one’s really sure, but at the very least the night mayor’s office has a Facebook and Instagram account now. (BrooklynVegan)

This year a New York Times piece by an Aperol Spritz denier kicked up a city-wide argument in defense of the summer-y drink. There will be a “Rally for Aperol” on Friday, which sounds less like a rally and more like a sponsored event at a bar. (Time Out)

Manhattanhenge approcheth. (I Love the Upper West Side)

An update on Charter Communications, the company trying to buy Time Warner Cable and was subsequently told to leave New York because of poor service, broken promises, and defrauding the state. They’re being allowed to stay after promising they won’t break any more promises. (Boing Boing)

Howie, the wallaby that ended up in the case of the Animal Care Centers of NYC, will find a new home in the Bronx Zoo. (Patch)

The governor signed a bill into law that will increase the number of speed cameras in school zones from 140 to 750 this summer, which makes last year’s fight over cameras feel like an extremely distant memory. The cameras will operate from 6am to 10pm. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here are the eight hopefuls in the 45th Council District in Flatbush’s special election, vying for Jumaane William’s former seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: Is this the subway car of the future? Forget high tech, just give us a place to stand where our crotch isn’t directly in someone’s face while they eat their carton of egg salad. (Cheddar)

If you’re someone who collected limited edition MetroCards, 9/11 Emergency Responder MetroCard will soon be available at 10 stations. If you’d like to avoid a daily reminder of the city’s terrorist disaster, there are 10 stations you should not buy your MetroCard at. (Gothamist)

A yeshiva in Queens was closed as the city’s cases of the measles is nearly at 500 people. Eight of the nine schools and daycare centers previously closed have reopened under Department of Health supervision. (amNY)

Video: A tour from a real New York insider. Richard Splett’s New York Splett of Mind for Splettnet.net. Richard Splett was recently Richard Splett on HBO’s Veep. (Splettnet)

The five best chocolate chip cookies in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for May 10, 2019 – The “Harlem’s WWI War Heroes Who Who Brought Jazz to France” Edition

Closing the Kusher Loophole, OMNY is coming, the officer whose chokehold killed Eric Garner’s disciplinary trial is moving forward, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The subway diversions are minimal this weekend, but when the bar is already so low, it’s hard to get underneath it. (Subway Changes)

Here’s a crazy idea. Is the L train slowdown going okay? (Bklyner)

NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial in the death of Eric Garner will go forward, a New York State Supreme Court judge ruled Thursday. (880 WCBS)

Declawing your cat may soon be illegal. Manhattan Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal’s 2015 bill is gaining traction again thanks to the newly formed Domestic Animal Welfare Committee formed this year. The bill has the support of the Humane Society and Black Sabbath bassist Geezer Butler. (Politico)

The Harlem Hellfighters spent 191 days on the Front during World War I and in their time there, they helped introduce jazz to France and were some of the war’s most decorated soldiers. (6sqft)

It seems like the city shouldn’t have to deter people from parking on sidewalks, but here we are. City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is pushing to put traffic cameras specifically looking to catch drivers who block bike lanes and sidewalks as a part of Transportation Alternatives’ #TechforSafety campaign. (LIC Post)

Scrap the SHSAT test for the city’s elite high schools. That’s the message from Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network chapter in the city. (Politico)

The murder trial of the man accused of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz began with opening statements from the prosecution saying the murder was pre-meditated. (NY City Lens)

Some information about the OMNY system, the new system to replace MetroCards, and how they will work. They’re scheduled to be rolled out at the end of the month, but MetroCards will be around until 2023. (amNY)

The New York Aquarium has four new black-footed penguins, which are endangered. Of course, there are photos of baby penguins. (amNY)

Stop telling people things you heard at parties and actually learn about the city’s tap water. (StreetEasy)

The Soho Grifter was sentenced to 4-12 years, fined $24,000 and ordered to pay back $199,000. The only thing the fake German heiress will inherit is a prison jumpsuit. (NY Times)

The cheapest one-bedroom apartments in the city are, unsurprisingly, in far-flung neighborhoods, but who can argue with a one-bedroom for less than $1500? (Patch)

Here’s a quiz on what you can or can’t do on the subway. If you fail, you have to move to Hoboken. Sorry, those are just the rules. (Gothamist)

As it fights to contain the measles outbreak, the city’s attention is starting to turn towards schools with less than 90% vaccination rates, like the Brooklyn Waldorf School, which 24% of students are unvaccinated. (NY Times)

If you’ve never had the, uh, pleasure of driving in Manhattan, here’s a video to give you an idea of what it’s like. (Viewing NYC)

Here are the neighborhoods where it takes the NYPD the longest to respond to a 911 call. (Patch)

Where to pick up your picnic vittles near to the city park of your choice. (amNY)

Del Posto was named the best Italian restaurant in the nation by The Daily Meal. Eleven restaurants in the city made the top fifty. (Patch)

Take a look inside the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport one week before its opening day. (Curbed)

2019: After the Fall of New York. Imagine an 80s b-movie version of Children of Men, Escape From New York, Mad Max and Beneath the Planet of the Apes, but shittier and you’ll end up with this Italian movie. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s 17 new approved bills is aimed at closing the “Kushner loophole,” which allowed landlords to falsely claim the number of rent-regulated tenants in its buildings. (6sqft)

Shakespeare & Co is opening a bookstore in Brookfield Place in Battery Park, where Amazon just opened a new store. (amNY)

21 of the best LGBTQ bars in NYC to party at right now, depending on the time of day you read this. (amNY)

The mayor is calling the NYC Care card a “new health coverage option,” but it’s more of a public awareness campaign for pre-existed public services form the city. It’s a public awareness campaign that can improve public health, but the mayor is clearly misrepresenting it as health insurance because of his delusional idea that anyone wants to see him run for president. (Gothamist)

A mini-Smorgasburg is coming to Hudson Yards. Heaven forbid that people who live there have to go to Brooklyn for anything. (6sqft)

Rene Samaniego, an NYPD vice detective, admitted to participating in a prolific prostitution ring and gambling enterprise throughout Queens, Brooklyn and Nassau County. (QNS)

Chartwell Booksellers, the world’s only Winston Churchill bookstore, has been nearly hidden for 36 years on E 52nd St. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to rooftop bars and outdoor drinking in 2019. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 8, 2019 – The “If You Have $27,500 to Spend on Rent” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Vision Zero Design push, the measles spreads to public schools, Bluestockings Bookstore launches a membership program, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A Brooklyn building collapsed after a car slammed into it. Of course, it was caught on video and shared to Twitter. No one was home and the driver tried to flee the scene but was caught by the neighborhood patrol. (Gothamist)

A look at Bjork’s ‘Cornucopia,’ which was previewed at The Shed. (BrooklynVegan)

These “What X,000 rents in NYC right now” posts come pretty regularly, but let’s take a look at what you could get if you have $8,000 a month to spend on rent. (Curbed)

Forget $8,000 a month. How about $27,500 a month for this West Village townhouse? (6sqft)

This is the smallest theater in NYC. Take a peek. (Untapped Cities)

Inside The Costume Institute’s CAMP exhibit at The Met. (Gothamist)

Believe it or not, there are neighborhoods where home prices are dropping. It might not be by much, but take what you can get. (Patch)

A Florida Man story ends on the L Train. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you only need a photo. Like this one of Lawrence Fishburne looking cool as hell on a street corner in 1989. (Viewing NYC)

Corey Johnson is going to push forward the Vision Design bill this month, putting him at odds with the mayor. The bill would force the DOT to develop a checklist of street design elements that enhance safety. For each eligible street, the DOT would be required to state which elements were applied, or why not if it wasn’t. Accountability isn’t the city government’s strong suit. (Streetsblog)

Johnson’s not short on presenting big ideas, it’s been two months since his “the city should take over the MTA” plan, which has been largely ignored and not discussed at all by all prominent players involved in state and city government. (Second Ave Sagas)

Amazon is building in Queens, but it’s a $5.6 factory with no high-paying tech jobs. (6sqft)

Amazon’s also coming to Manhattan, but with an Amazon Go store in the Brookfield Mall in downtown Manhattan. (Tribeca Citizen)

Six female corrections officers were arrested and arraigned in New York State Supreme Court following allegations they performed illegal strip searches on women attempting to visit their loved ones in a Manhattan jail. (The Root)

The ultimate guide to the High Line, from the basics to the history to the future. (Curbed)

Explore the city’s worst evictor landlords with the Right to Counsel NYC Coalition, JustFix.nyc, and the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project’s new website and interactive map. (Gothamist)

The Grub Street guide to Mother’s Day. (Grub Street)

Forget DC, Albany could allow Congress to see the president’s federal tax returns. (NY Times)

A guide for tipping in NYC. Send this to anyone visiting so you don’t have to answer their questions. (TripSavvy)

Sharpen your skills with the “Knife Lady of Chelsea Market.” (ABC 7)

Because the city will never be free from the grip of special elections, here are the eight candidates vying for Jumane Williams’s seat on the city council. (amNY)

It’s the seventh edition of NYCxDesign, here’s what to see. (NY Times)

The measles outbreak has grown to 466 cases, expanding into the city’s public schools. The infected students had religious exemptions from the vaccine. The city has given 84 summonses for failing to comply with the vaccine mandate. (amNY)

A photo of a fatberg in a water treatment plant should be enough of a reminder to stop flushing your “flushable” wipes. (StreetEasy)

Bluestockings Bookstore, the radical bookstore, fair trade cafe, and activist center in the Lower East Side, is starting a membership program on the event of their twentieth anniversary to stay a radical outpost in a capitalist world. (Bedford + Bowery)

The best seafood restaurants and dishes in the city. (Thrillist)

10,000 Uber drivers in the city plan to strike on Wednesday morning in solidarity with worldwide drivers’ protest of Ubers SEC filing. (amNY)

The first trans-Atlantic flight was 100 years ago today, originating from Fort Tilden in Queens. It was eight years before Charles Lindburg’s nonstop solo flight. It was six Navy and Coast Guard crewmen and it took three weeks in their NC-4 seaplane. (NY Times)

This week’s featured walk from GoRoam: Scenic Chelsea and Greenwich Village (GoRoam)