The Briefly for January 17-18, 2021 – The “Micheal Scott in Times Square at Sbarro” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: MLK day in NYC, how to get vaccinated in NYC, meet the 38 mayoral candidates, Cuomo’s infrastructure projects, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 43˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

What’s open and closed on Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 18. (Matt Troutman for PAtch)

A list of NYC’s tributes to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

BAM is presenting The 35th Annual Brooklyn Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., which is free and virtual on Monday at 11 am. (BAM)

How to get the Coronavirus vaccine in NYC. (Ron Lieber)

Map: How New York state is doing with its vaccine rollout. (Hint: New York City has the lowest percentage of first doses administered. (Jen Chung and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

On Thursday afternoon a message was going online around that there would be vaccines administered on a first-come, first-served basis at the Brooklyn Army Terminal. This was called a hoax by some but there was truth to the message. Very quickly, the vaccination site was overwhelmed with people. Vaccination sites have the ability to administer “extra” vaccines at the end of the day if they are going to expire but the city isn’t looking for a Black Friday scenario every day at every vaccination site. I’d expect this policy to change as a result of these lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It seems impossible that there are “extra” doses of the vaccine lying around when tens of thousands of vaccination appointments are being canceled in New York due to the limited supply of the vaccine provided by the federal government. The state’s supply was cut from 300,000 per week to 250,000 per week with 100,000 being allocated to the city. (Joseph Goldstein and Sharon Otterman for NY Times)

There are over 30 people running for mayor in 2021. Here’s a quick rundown of them all. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Of the 38 candidates, Eric Adams and Scott Stringer have received the most cash support. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

It is decided that Andrew Yang will be this mayoral cycle’s punching bag. He’s not helping himself when the first question asked of him is “don’t you live in the Hudson Valley?” and the second question is now “don’t you know what a bodega is?” While it’s still early in his campaign, he’s making a few unforced communication errors that are not endearing him to the city as “one of our own.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

Real Estate Lust: This penthouse has so much outdoor space the first photo doesn’t even look real. $12.5 million, 3,500 square feet of outdoor space, and a dining room that can seat 30. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Satire: “My work seeks to interrogate the parameters by which we define and demarcate physical space, exploring the fertile liminal zone between the falsely binary notions of “indoors” and “outdoors” we too often take for granted.” –I Am The Designer Of This Restaurant’s Outdoor Seating Space, And This Is My Artist’s Statement (Simon Henriques for McSweeney’s)

Takeout in Greenpoint for under $10. (Katie White for Greenpointers)

On Tuesday night, the Empire State Building will beat like a heart, bathed in red light, as a part of Joe Biden’s Covid-19 memorial from 5:30 pm to 2 am. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

160 secrets about New York City, enough to impress some of your friends but bore the rest. For instance: Einstein’s eyeballs are stored in a safety deposit box in the city. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A look at ranked-choice voting ahead of the first election to use it in NYC, the February 2 City Council District 24 election. (Pia Koh for Queens County Politics)

Governor Cuomo is floating the idea of using rapid Covid testing to determine entry into live events. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

Four restaurants that recently started selling groceries. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A running list of restaurants that are temporarily closing this winter. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Governor Cuomo unveiled a $306 billion infrastructure plan that would replace the Port Authority Bus Terminal with a new state-of-the-art facility, reconstruct Penn Station and add at least eight new tracks along with 14 new buildings with retail space and up to 1,400 affordable apartments, a new waterfront park at Pier 76, and a $1.5 billion expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Center. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Atlas Obscura usually highlights mysteries or fascinations. There is no fascinating mystery quite like the Gowanus Canal. (Jessica Leigh Hester for Atlas Obscura)

The Times highlights the life and tireless work of Michael Evans, the project manager of the Moynihan Hall transformation. Evans took his own life seemingly due to the stress of the project only ten months before its completion. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The City jumps into NY AG Letitia James’s lawsuit against the city and NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan’s role as the architect of the aggressive and violent response to the city’s protests over the summer and his history of over-policing peaceful protests, directing cops to make unlawful arrests and allowing the use of excessive force going back 16 years. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The visuals of the MTA bus that fell off an overpass are amazing, especially considering no one died and only eight were injured. The bus was going 17-26 mph when it should have been going 3-4 mph. (Jen Chung and Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

More photos from the MTA of the bus incident and the media briefing. (Photographer Marc A. Hermann for MTA on Flickr)

For a laugh, the best pizza places in New Jersey. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Filming locations for Martin Scorsese & Fran Lebowitz’s “Pretend It’s a City.” I’m extremely jealous they got to walk in the Queens Museum’s Panorama of the City of New York. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Deanne Criswell, city’s Emergency Management Commissioner, is Joe Biden’s pick for the next head of FEMA. (NY1)

Kyrie Irving, Brooklyn Nets point guard and complete asshole, was fined $50,000 for breaking the NBA’s Covid-19 protocols. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The argument for Mets owner Steven Cohen to bring Coney Island’s original hot dog, Feltman’s, to Citi Field. (The Coney Island Blog)

The New York City Campaign Finance Board fined current City Councilmember Mathieu Eugene $10,717 for nine violations of campaign finance law, including failure to report transactions and making impermissible post-election expenditures. (Billy Richling for Bklyner)

Here’s wishing Congressmember, Adriano Espaillat, who represents parts of the Bronx and Manhattan, a speedy recovery after testing positive for Covid-19, likely contracting the virus during the attack on the Capitol and sheltering in place with Republicans who refused to wear masks. (Norwood News)

For the spooky set, part four of the GVSHP’s Cemeteries of the East Village. (Sam Moskowitz for GVSHP)

Where to eat when staying warm is a top priority. Restaurants with outdoor heating lamps. (Hannah Albertine and Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Today’s featured photo is by Marc A. Hermann, courtesy of the MTA

The Briefly for December 4-5, 2020 – The “Where to Cry in Public” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The vaccine arrives in NYC by December 15, Marie’s Crisis reopens, the Dyker Heights lights are back (with controversy), and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 51˚
Rain starting in the afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 32˚ High: 46˚

Get a jump on January and learn how to run in the winter. (Jen A. Miller for NY Times)

The state’s Green Light Law, which allowed undocumented immigrants to apply for driver’s licenses, survived a federal appeals court challenge. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

12 new public art installations this month. (Untapped New York)

There’s a screenshot of the best places to cry in NYC making its way around the internet but experienced public cryers will know there was an entire Tumblr account dedicated to places to cry. (NYC Crying Guide)

Gothamist wants your help to write NYC a love letter for 2020. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Video: Did you see (and hear) the terrifying sights and sounds of the Verrazzano Bridge on Monday during the storm? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Remember that guy who experienced a living nightmare of falling 12 feet through the sidewalk into a sinkhole that was full of rats where he was trapped for 30 minutes? He’s suing. It doesn’t matter what the amount is, it isn’t enough. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Meet Charles Barry, who has been scamming subway riders for nearly 40 years and has been arrested about 160 times. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Marie’s Crisis is ready to open again on December 8 at a 25% capacity, allowing only 15 patrons in at a time. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

A list of NYC-themed gifts. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

“These employees allegedly worked very hard – to steal MTA time and money,” say hello to the five MTA employees accused of “brazen, repeated” overtime fraud. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: The construction of the Statue of Liberty. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

It’s the future site of 1,000 below-market-rate apartments and according to the EPA, it’s also home to a ton of toxic pollution a few feet underground. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Staten Island’s Mac’s Public House declared itself an “autonomous zone” from the state’s Covid-19 laws. It’s co-owner Danny Presti was arrested. This was followed by a swam of shitheads gathering to protest. The zip code has the fourth-highest Covid-19 positivity rate in the city. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Two dozen subway cars were hit by a graffiti storm over the weekend, hitting the 1, 6, M, G, and Q lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Photos: The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is lit. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Despite what you may have read in this very newsletter, you don’t actually need a ticket to see the Christmas tree, but they are limiting the number of people who can be in the plaza at once. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The history of the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Looking for a less auspicious holiday light display? Check out this Google Doc with almost 30 holiday light displays across the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Speaking of holiday displays, the Dyker Heights Christmas lights are coming back this year, and people are not happy about it. 2020, amirite? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

6 department store holiday windows to check out. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

RIP Betsy Wade, the first woman to edit news copy for The New York Times. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

The city can’t move the homeless New Yorkers from the Upper West Side’s Lucerne Hotel for at least two more weeks after an Appellate Court issued a temporary stay that prevents the city from moving them. This story has been ongoing since July. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

It’s looking more and more like auditions for city schools’ performing arts programs will be moving online. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Outdoor dining is looking more and more like indoor dining. Bedford + Bowery asks and answers if it’s safe. The answer is that it is not. (Justin McGowan for Bedford + Bowery)

A new report that looks at data from 121 cities over 10 years shows that mass transit is not a significant vector for spreading viruses. That being said, wear your damn masks on the subway. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside NYC’s biggest Covid-19 lab. (Elizabeth Kim with photos by Scott Heins for Gothamist)

78% of the surveyed restaurant workers report hostile behavior from customers when staff try to enforce COVID-19 safety rules according to a new study from the One Fair Wage advocacy group. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

New York will get 170,000 doses of the Covid-19 vaccine by December 15, according to Governor Cuomo. The first phase of distribution will be focused on healthcare workers and residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Unboxing videos on YouTube hit their peak in popularity around 2014, but that didn’t stop Governor Cuomo’s live unboxing of an empty Pfizer vaccine box during a press conference this week. “What’s up, it’s ya boy Gov Cuomo and today we’re unboxing a vaccine. Remember to like, comment, and subscribe if you wanna see more content like this in the future and also to smash that bell icon to get notifications because you might miss a video if you don’t.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The CDC shortened its recommended quarantine to 10 days, but included a plea to just stop traveling. Roni Caryn Rabin for NY Times)

Dr Fauci, who will be staying on with the Biden administration, said we could get “back to normal, or at least approaching close to normal, as you get into the late summer and early fall,” if 75-85% of Americans get vaccinated. This was in response to a question about Broadway reopening, which has been closed since March 12 of this year. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The New York Blood Center fears a blood shortage. Here’s how to help. (Ron Lee for NY1)

10 holiday markets, pop-ups, and sales this weekend. (the skint)

The Briefly for June 8, 2020 – The “I Guess This Is Phase One?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase one kicks off today, the mayor is forced to lift the city’s curfew early, the MTA’s plans for phase one, a protest of the mayor, and more

Are you absentee voting this month? (You should be absentee voting this month.) Here’s how to make sure your absentee vote counts. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

The absentee ballot deadline was extended to June 23. Get your application in now. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Here we go, phase one. Here’s what it means. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The mayor announced he would end the city’s curfew one day early because, according to him, there had been a night without violent protests. In the reality that the rest of us live in, a lawsuit from the NYCLU, the Legal Aid Society, the Thurgood Marchall Civil Rights Center, and the Center for Constitutional Rights were about to force the mayor to lift the curfew and three different district attorneys in the city refused to charge most protestors that were arrested. (Ali Tufan Koc and Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A protest of the mayor is expected on Monday morning (or was expected, depending on when you read this) to push de Blasio into actually enacting police reforms. The march, which includes members of the mayor’s administration, isn’t organized by the same people who wrote the open letter tot he mayor, but it shows how unified the city is in its disgust over the mayor’s ability to talk a lot and do very little. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

As Minneapolis already has, activists are calling on the NYC Department of Education to cut ties with the NYPD. Chancellor Richard Carranza, appointed by the mayor, does not favor a “counselors not cops” approach to school safety. Since 2014 the school safety budget has increased by 25% and while the school budget for next year is decreasing under the budget already revealed by the mayor, the budget for safety is increasing. (Alex Zimmerman for The City)

What can the city do with the NYPD’s $6 billion? Quite a bit. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Thursday night’s NYPD ambush of peaceful protesters was, according to Commissioner Dermont Shea, “executed flawlessly.” It included beating and arresting legal observers, medics, pepper-spraying a pregnant woman, and featured Terence Monahan kneeling with protesters one moment and directing officers to arrest the protest’s leaders the next. The NYPD claimed that “interlopers” were to blame for the police violence but a video of what happened shows otherwise and the NYPD has yet to show any evidence of this. (Jake Offenhartz and Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A look at the NYPD’s strategy of “kettling” protestors, which shows a shift in police tactics towards aggression. Of course, the mayor has defended this practice, saying it is sometimes necessary for public safety. I’m not sure which public he’s referring to. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Does the name Terence Monahan ring a bell? It should because he was the person in charge of the city’s response to protesters during the 2004 GOP convention. In 2004 the protesters had been told they could march and were then arrested en masse. Charges were dismissed against all 227 arrested. The city later settling a lawsuit with the protesters for $18 million. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Terence Monahan has a legacy of brutality. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Governor Cuomo announced a “Say Their Name” package of bills which would criminalize making a false race-based 911 call, ban chokeholds, revise 50-1 (unknown what this means), and assign the Attorney General an independent prosecutor for matters related to the death of unarmed citizens caused by law enforcement. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The state’s Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus has their own package of 13 bills they’ve unveiled which also adds mandates for body cameras for state and MTA police, establishes strangulation as a crime mandates medical attention for people under arrest, and more. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

We’re committed to seeing a shift of funding to youth services, to social services, that will happen literally in the course of the next three weeks, but I’m not going to go into detail because it is subject to negotiation and we want to figure out what makes sense.” -Mayor de Blasio, talking big, one more time. He says “literally in the course of the next three weeks” because it literally has to get done because of the city’s budget, not because he wants to enact reforms quickly. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Two NYPD officers were suspended for violence against protesters. One is the officer who pushed a woman to the ground and the other the officer who pulled down a protester’s face mask and pepper-sprayed him. Just two. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Next, suspend every cop who covered their badge number during the protests with the bullshit excuse of the covers being “mourning bands.” (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: East Village storefronts show their support for Black Lives Matter. (EV Grieve)

In comparison, the award for “the shittiest tribute to victims of racial violence” goes to the Museum of Ice Cream’s “I Scream For…” painted boards. (Elie Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Returning to the subways today? Here’s what you need to know. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The MTA clearly has a plan for people who will be riding the subway. It may not be a perfect plan, but it’s a plan. The mayor? Come on, you know he doesn’t have a plan based in reality. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

“This week and going forward, you might notice some other helpful additions to your local station — like new hand sanitizer dispensers and new signs reminding you how to keep yourself safe. You’ll also see floor markings, floor decals, and new directions aimed at communicating with you clearly about how to safely move around our system.
-Sarah Feinberg, acting President of MTA New York City Transit for amNewyork Metro, MTA is glad to have you back for the NYC reopening

With June 8’s phase one reopening of the city, you might be asking a few questions that are closer to home, like “will my building’s gym/pool be opening soon?” Get ready for a complicated road back. (Joanne Kaufman for NY Times)

The city will begin testing sewage for Covid-19, to get an idea of how the virus is spreading hundreds or thousands of people at a time. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into a law that will grant death benefits to Covid-19 frontline workers’ families. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

A peek into what remains of Park, a Chelsea restaurant that abruptly closed last year and appears to be slowly taken over by trees. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

If you’re like me, at this point in the summer you’d have ridden the Coney Island Cyclone multiple times. If you’ve been missing the anticipation of the climb of the first hill and the exhilaration of the drop, these 360° videos of the Cyclone and Thunderbolt are gonna be as close as we can get for a while. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Last Wednesday night the city’s known Covid-19 death toll hit 0 for the first time since March 12. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

James Bennet, who oversaw the editorial pages of the NY Times, is out. The paper blames it on “a significant breakdown of our editorial process” because of the Senator Tom Cotton editorial which promoted violence against protesters. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

RIP Kanela, a red-headed Siberian husky and the unofficial mascot of Welcome2TheBronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

In 1982, the MTA thought they could paint their cars brilliant white to prevent them from being spray painted. “The Great White Fleet” idea was as stupid as it sounds. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

A bit of news that passed by in the insanity that was Memorial Day weekend and every single day since then, the City Council banned the use of the terms “alien” and “illegal immigrant” on official city documents. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Central Park West’s mystery manhole cover. (Ephemeral New York)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse in Prospect Heights with outdoor space, amazing woodwork, and one of the most wildly-colored bathrooms I’ve ever seen. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A list of lists: A roundup of NYC’s Black-owned restaurant lists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Thank you to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!