The Briefly for June 8, 2020 – The “I Guess This Is Phase One?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase one kicks off today, the mayor is forced to lift the city’s curfew early, the MTA’s plans for phase one, a protest of the mayor, and more

Are you absentee voting this month? (You should be absentee voting this month.) Here’s how to make sure your absentee vote counts. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

The absentee ballot deadline was extended to June 23. Get your application in now. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Here we go, phase one. Here’s what it means. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The mayor announced he would end the city’s curfew one day early because, according to him, there had been a night without violent protests. In the reality that the rest of us live in, a lawsuit from the NYCLU, the Legal Aid Society, the Thurgood Marchall Civil Rights Center, and the Center for Constitutional Rights were about to force the mayor to lift the curfew and three different district attorneys in the city refused to charge most protestors that were arrested. (Ali Tufan Koc and Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A protest of the mayor is expected on Monday morning (or was expected, depending on when you read this) to push de Blasio into actually enacting police reforms. The march, which includes members of the mayor’s administration, isn’t organized by the same people who wrote the open letter tot he mayor, but it shows how unified the city is in its disgust over the mayor’s ability to talk a lot and do very little. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

As Minneapolis already has, activists are calling on the NYC Department of Education to cut ties with the NYPD. Chancellor Richard Carranza, appointed by the mayor, does not favor a “counselors not cops” approach to school safety. Since 2014 the school safety budget has increased by 25% and while the school budget for next year is decreasing under the budget already revealed by the mayor, the budget for safety is increasing. (Alex Zimmerman for The City)

What can the city do with the NYPD’s $6 billion? Quite a bit. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Thursday night’s NYPD ambush of peaceful protesters was, according to Commissioner Dermont Shea, “executed flawlessly.” It included beating and arresting legal observers, medics, pepper-spraying a pregnant woman, and featured Terence Monahan kneeling with protesters one moment and directing officers to arrest the protest’s leaders the next. The NYPD claimed that “interlopers” were to blame for the police violence but a video of what happened shows otherwise and the NYPD has yet to show any evidence of this. (Jake Offenhartz and Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A look at the NYPD’s strategy of “kettling” protestors, which shows a shift in police tactics towards aggression. Of course, the mayor has defended this practice, saying it is sometimes necessary for public safety. I’m not sure which public he’s referring to. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Does the name Terence Monahan ring a bell? It should because he was the person in charge of the city’s response to protesters during the 2004 GOP convention. In 2004 the protesters had been told they could march and were then arrested en masse. Charges were dismissed against all 227 arrested. The city later settling a lawsuit with the protesters for $18 million. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Terence Monahan has a legacy of brutality. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Governor Cuomo announced a “Say Their Name” package of bills which would criminalize making a false race-based 911 call, ban chokeholds, revise 50-1 (unknown what this means), and assign the Attorney General an independent prosecutor for matters related to the death of unarmed citizens caused by law enforcement. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The state’s Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus has their own package of 13 bills they’ve unveiled which also adds mandates for body cameras for state and MTA police, establishes strangulation as a crime mandates medical attention for people under arrest, and more. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

We’re committed to seeing a shift of funding to youth services, to social services, that will happen literally in the course of the next three weeks, but I’m not going to go into detail because it is subject to negotiation and we want to figure out what makes sense.” -Mayor de Blasio, talking big, one more time. He says “literally in the course of the next three weeks” because it literally has to get done because of the city’s budget, not because he wants to enact reforms quickly. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Two NYPD officers were suspended for violence against protesters. One is the officer who pushed a woman to the ground and the other the officer who pulled down a protester’s face mask and pepper-sprayed him. Just two. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Next, suspend every cop who covered their badge number during the protests with the bullshit excuse of the covers being “mourning bands.” (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: East Village storefronts show their support for Black Lives Matter. (EV Grieve)

In comparison, the award for “the shittiest tribute to victims of racial violence” goes to the Museum of Ice Cream’s “I Scream For…” painted boards. (Elie Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Returning to the subways today? Here’s what you need to know. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The MTA clearly has a plan for people who will be riding the subway. It may not be a perfect plan, but it’s a plan. The mayor? Come on, you know he doesn’t have a plan based in reality. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

“This week and going forward, you might notice some other helpful additions to your local station — like new hand sanitizer dispensers and new signs reminding you how to keep yourself safe. You’ll also see floor markings, floor decals, and new directions aimed at communicating with you clearly about how to safely move around our system.
-Sarah Feinberg, acting President of MTA New York City Transit for amNewyork Metro, MTA is glad to have you back for the NYC reopening

With June 8’s phase one reopening of the city, you might be asking a few questions that are closer to home, like “will my building’s gym/pool be opening soon?” Get ready for a complicated road back. (Joanne Kaufman for NY Times)

The city will begin testing sewage for Covid-19, to get an idea of how the virus is spreading hundreds or thousands of people at a time. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into a law that will grant death benefits to Covid-19 frontline workers’ families. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

A peek into what remains of Park, a Chelsea restaurant that abruptly closed last year and appears to be slowly taken over by trees. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

If you’re like me, at this point in the summer you’d have ridden the Coney Island Cyclone multiple times. If you’ve been missing the anticipation of the climb of the first hill and the exhilaration of the drop, these 360° videos of the Cyclone and Thunderbolt are gonna be as close as we can get for a while. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Last Wednesday night the city’s known Covid-19 death toll hit 0 for the first time since March 12. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

James Bennet, who oversaw the editorial pages of the NY Times, is out. The paper blames it on “a significant breakdown of our editorial process” because of the Senator Tom Cotton editorial which promoted violence against protesters. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

RIP Kanela, a red-headed Siberian husky and the unofficial mascot of Welcome2TheBronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

In 1982, the MTA thought they could paint their cars brilliant white to prevent them from being spray painted. “The Great White Fleet” idea was as stupid as it sounds. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

A bit of news that passed by in the insanity that was Memorial Day weekend and every single day since then, the City Council banned the use of the terms “alien” and “illegal immigrant” on official city documents. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Central Park West’s mystery manhole cover. (Ephemeral New York)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse in Prospect Heights with outdoor space, amazing woodwork, and one of the most wildly-colored bathrooms I’ve ever seen. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A list of lists: A roundup of NYC’s Black-owned restaurant lists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Thank you to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 18, 2020 – The “Bored Enough to Give Yourself a Tattoo?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The entire city will take a huge financial hit in 2020, except the NYPD, the late-night delivery guide, the Williams Pipeline is dead, baby bears, and more

Today – Low: 55˚ High: 68˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, hitting only 3 of the 7 metrics necessary to start phase one of reopening.

There will be no city beaches open for Memorial Day weekend. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

As New York state is losing billions of dollars, politicians are turning their eyes towards a source of revenue they’ve failed to pull the trigger on for years: legal marijuana. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Watch Andean Bear cubs Brienne and Benny explore their habitat in the Queens Zoo for the first time. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

How bored are you at home? Are you ready to do your own stick and poke tattoo? (Dani Blum for NY Times)

Will the Covid-19 pandemic mean the end of the walk-in tattoo appointment? When the city’s tattoo shops reopen, there’s a chance. What will all the tattoo parlors do with their very clever Christopher Walken-related signs? (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The city’s park conservancies are expecting a massive financial hit this year, forcing them to drastically alter their organizations, including a reduction of over 350,000 hours of work, a half-million trees not being planted, an 80% reduction of park improvements, with up to a 68% loss of income in the worst case. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Governor Cuomo warned that without the HEROES Act, there would be devastating cuts to the budgets of education and medical programs, as well as local governments. (Robert Pzarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The NYC Ferry system is looking at a 20% reduction on top of the 30% reduction in service, with an intent to save the city up to $10 million. In addition, new ferry locations are being pushed back to 2021. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city is no different. The $10 billion shortfall will impact pretty much everything the city offers, like canceling the youth employment program, freezing new teacher hires, and killing environmental initiatives. As crime is at historic lows, the NYPD is not poised to take much of a financial hit at all, as de Blasio’s administration prioritizes policing its citizens over helping them. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This is the same NYPD that was incapable of enforcing social distancing without immediately reminding us all about its racist enforcement of stop-and-frisk as officers beat and pummeled people of color all across the city while glad-handing white people in parks. The NYPD has shown us the Peter Principle up close, as the mayor has reduced their role in enforcing social distancing because they can’t be trusted to treat all New Yorkers like people. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

This is the same NYPD that can’t be bothered to actually execute the city’s open streets plans while its people are desperate for space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The NYPD won’t even be fully in charge of the city’s plans to limit access to portions of parks to prevent overcrowding. A portion of the work will be going to the city’s 2,260 new “social distancing ambassadors.” (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewyork Metro)

Jadakiss donated 250 pizzas to medicals centers throughout in the Bronx, Harlem, and Yonkers as part of the Pizza vs. Pandemic initiative. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

The Times rides-along with the subway shutdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Photos from the inside of the 30th Street Men’s Shelter on First Avenue in Manhattan show people in close quarters sleeping on stairs and in hallways, proving the city is failing its population of homeless New Yorkers. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

The city’s response to the photos was to put more homeless New Yorkers into hotel rooms but has been pairing them up, which seems counterproductive if you’re trying to prevent the spread of Covid-19. The City Council is preparing a bill that would require hotel rooms used as an alternative to shelters to be single occupancy. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

WNYC and Gothamistreceived an $8.9 million Paycheck Protection Program loan from the federal government to help the $10 million deficit it was projecting, saving many journalism jobs. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

VICE, owned by Refinery29, announced its laying off 155 employees. There is local support to add financial support for digital media in the HEROES Act in Congress, but I can’t fathom a world where the Trump administration does anything to actually help journalists. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

An analysis puts the number of people who fled the city between Match and May at 420,000. In some neighborhoods like the Upper East Side, the West Village, SoHo, and Brooklyn Heights, the population has decreased by up to 40%. It should be no surprise that the more wealthy someone is, the most likely they were to abandon New York City. (Kevin Quealy for NY Times)

The New York Department of Environmental Conservation denied a permit necessary for the construction of the Williams Pipeline, essentially killing the fracked gas pipeline that would have terminated in the Rockaways and was at the center of National Grid’s refusal of service to new customers at the end of last year. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Someone is trying to plan a drive-in festival in “Yankee Stadium’s parking lot,” including live music, movies, games, etc. Take a moment and open up a map app or website and take a look at Yankee Stadium. Try to find “the parking lot.” Yankee Stadium doesn’t actually have a large parking lot. There are parking garages and a few dirt lots that double as parking when there are games, but there isn’t one large parking lot near the stadium like there is at Citi Field where you would think an elevated stage would let anyone see a performance. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Notify NYC sent out a mass text on Saturday saying there’s an “alarming shortage of donated blood.” The FDA amended its homophobic rule about not accepting blood donations from gay or bisexual men (but still won’t accept blood from a man who has had sexual contact with another man in the last three months) but the New York Blood Center says it can’t adopt those changes until June. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

The signs for Gem Spa came down over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

“You could feel it going through your veins and it was almost like someone injected you with straight-up fire.” The new syndrome linked to Covid-19 that is impacting kids sounds like actual hell. (Pan Belluck for NY Times)

New York children of color may be more vulnerable to the toxic shock-like syndrome linked to new coronavirus, according to demographic data released by City Hall. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city closed the field hospital at the Billie Jean King Tennis Center, which housed 79 patients, the last of whom left the hospital on Saturday. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

The late-night delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured flower photo from Grand Army Plaza in Central Park.

The Briefly for April 30, 2020 – The “I Will Report You To 311 For This!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Alternatives for grocery delivery, Governor Cuomo’s quizzical piece of art, 40 inexpensive takeout suggestions, IKEA Rego Park’s opening delayed, and more

Today – Low: 53˚ High: 57˚
Rain until morning, starting again in the evening.

Waiting for an antibody test is the new waiting for a table at brunch. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

One of Brooklyn’s best places to go for peace and quiet is now closed to the public. Floyd Bennett Field is being used to store MTA buses, cutting off access to the Gateway National Recreation Area, Floyd Bennett Gardens Association’s access to their gardens, and some of the city’s best spots for biking. (Gabriel Sandoval and Jose Martinez for The City)

Andrew Yang is suing New York state for canceling the Democratic presidential primary, trying to get it reinstated. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

“I am not happy at all, and this doesn’t have to do with what candidate you are supporting.” –AOC on the primary’s cancelation. (Juan Manuel Benitez for NY1)

Residential noise complaints to 311 have gone up by 22% during everyone’s quarantine. I’m sorry, I’m trying to perfect my tap dancing. I’ll try to keep it down. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

A look inside the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center and how it’s kept itself, and the city’s food supply chain, going during the pandemic. (Gary He for Eater)

VIDEO: “The Central Park,” a mashup of scenes from movies in or around Central Park. (Flaming Pablum)

Major League Baseball continues to think of how to play the remainder of the season, whenever that might start. The latest idea disbands the American and National Leagues in favor of three geographic-based leagues and highlights local rivalries, giving us a season’s worth of Subway Series games. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The cover of the April 15 New Yorker sums life up pretty well right now. An interview with Chris Ware about “Still Life.” (Françoise Mouly for The New Yorker)

Sara Erenthal’s work, which uses the city’s trash as a canvas for years, has been featured multiple times in The Briefly’s daily photos (including one claiming “our president is an absolute piece of shit, which I got an angry email about). Here’s an interview with Erenthal about her art and experience creating it. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A series of interviews with N.Y.U. Langone Health nurses, who bear the burden and weight of the city’s sick and dying. (David Gonzalez and Sinna Nasseri for NY Times)

“You know what it spells? It spells love.” When Governor Cuomo unveiled a wall of masks, I spent a few moments actually searching for the word “LOVE” within it. He was speaking metaphorically and I’m glad no one was around to watch me lean in and squint to try to see it. I wasn’t the only one confused. (Kathleen Culliton for

Go beyond Amazon Prime and Instacart. 10 grocery delivery services that are locally focused. (amNewYork Metro)

The funeral in Williamsburg is putting the NYPD and city officials in a tough spot. More than 2,000 Satmar Hasidic Jewish residents flooded the streets, despite an attempt to work with the NYPD to socially distance, endangering everyone involved. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea stated it bluntly: there will be “zero tolerance” for gatherings like this in the future because the crowds are “putting my cops at risk.” (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

“I have no regrets about calling out this danger and saying we’re going to be dealing with it very, very aggressively” -Mayor de Blasio on future enforcement of social distancing after the funeral. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

CitiBike is expanding into upper Manhattan and the Bronx starting the week of May 4 with 100 new docking stations. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A map of the Bronx’s new CitiBike locations. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The city will offer COVID-19 antibody tests to 150,000 health care workers and first responders to determine whether they’ve been infected. The Department of Defense will also be setting up a program to treat health care workers for “combat stress.” Chirlane McCray is in charge of the mental health program. Hopefully, unlike her past work with ThriveNYC, this will be proven to be effective. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Throughout May, the city will transfer 1,000 New Yorkers living in city homeless shelters every week to vacant hotel rooms, according to the mayor. The city has approximately 30,000 empty hotel rooms. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The YMCA launched YMCA @ Home, free workout classes. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is offering 200 exhibition catalogs from its archives for free, dating back to 1936. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Last weekend you baked Junior’s cheesecake, this weekend are you ready for another challenge? Here’s the recipe for Magnolia Bakery’s iconic cupcakes. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

A closer look at the MTA’s new code of conduct that is written with the explicit intention of clearing homeless New Yorkers from trains and enable daily disinfecting of each car. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

IKEA Rego Park’s store opening has been pushed back to the fall. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

Dozens of bodies — many of which were the remains of coronavirus victims – were seen being loaded from several U-Haul trucks to a refrigerator truck outside of a Brooklyn funeral home on Wednesday. (Todd Maisel and Jessica Parks for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Samuel Hargress Jr., owner of Paris Blues in Harlem and “the soul ambassador of, that culture of community.” (Steven Kurutz for NY Times)

Vox Media furloughed 9% of its staff and will be making Curbed a part of New York Magazine. Starting May 1, Curbed will be completely furloughed for three months. There is a GoFundMe for the Vox staff who have been furloughed. (Vox Media Furlough Fund)

Looking to donate food to the city’s essential workers? Here are eight ways to deliver food without having to leave your couch. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

40 inexpensive dining destinations still open, straight from Robert Sietsema’s inexpensive dining column. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Natalie for today’s featured photo!