The Briefly for August 30, 2019 – The “Celebrations Have Already Begun” Labor Day Weekend Edition

Holiday weekend subway changes, closed streets for J’Ouvert and West Indian Day Carnival, bringing a dead squirrel on the subway, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The first Labor Day celebration took place in Manhattan 130 years ago. (amNY)

Street closings and timings for this year’s J’Ouvert festival and West Indian American Day Carnival. (Curbed)

This weekend is the last big weekend for the Hailstone icehouse in Crown Heights, as they sell ice like it’s going out of style, 40 pounds at a time. (NY Times)

What’s open and closed for Labor Day weekend. (Patch)

This weekend’s weather is looking pretty comfortable. (amNY)

The change from L train shutdown to slowdown is nearly doubling the project’s cost. (Curbed)

Step inside of Sweet Afton and you’ll feel like you’re inside a Wes Anderson movie. It wouldn’t be far from the truth, because the bar’s redesign was put together by Kris Moran, set designer for Moonrise Kingdom. (Time Out)

NYCHA General Manager Vito Mustaciuolo is under investigation for harassment. An expose in the Daily News outlined his misbehavior. The NYCHA hasn’t said if he will continue working full-time while the investigation proceeds. (Patch)

It’s that time of year again: New York Fashion Week starts next weekend. (amNY)

Squirrels can be cute, but bringing a dead squirrel onto the subway is not cute. (Patch)

A look at the rejected ballots from the Katz/Cabán primary in Queens and how easily Katz’s 55-vote lead could have been easily erased. (The Indypendent)

Put Stan Lee on New York’s new license plate, you cowards! (Bronx Times)

A preview of Portal: Governors Island, an art fair which opens on Governors Island this Saturday. (Gothamist)

Where to eat and shop in Hell’s Kitchen. (amNY)

The five-day celebration of J’Ouvert has already begun. (Street Easy)

Brooklyn’s first Chick-fil-A is accused of trying to poach workers from local businesses. (Patch)

The City Council is being accused of trying to bury a public meeting about the plan to replace Rikers Island with four “community” jails by scheduling it on the hectic first day of school. (Queens Eagle)

The number of city classrooms with lead-paint hazards has doubled after a set of inspections, bringing the number to 1,858. The city says all the affected classrooms will be ready for Thursday’s first day of school. The Department of Education is supposed to inspect each classroom annually. (Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has failed to qualify for the next round of Democratic presidential debates in September. The mayor has already said he didn’t plan on dropping out of the race if he didn’t qualify. Mayor, what is so wrong with the city that you lead that you’d prefer to spend this much time away from it? (Patch)

Despite the law signed by Governor Cuomo last week barring them from state waters, the company floating billboards around Manhattan and Brooklyn’s shoreline continues to do so after finding a loophole in the language used in the law. The state has not enforced the new law with any citations. (Gothamist)

The case against Jeffrey Epstein was officially closed by a Manhattan federal judge. (Patch)

One of the hidden gems of the garment district is Acuario Cafe. How can you find it? There no signs and you can only find by walking through a freight elevator of an office building on 37th St. (Viewing NYC)

Do you know about the IFC’s secret peephole? (Bedford + Bowery)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge bike lanes make riding across the bridge easy. Getting to the bridge on a bike? Much more difficult. (amNY)

Two former NYPD Detectives who were initially accused of raping an 18-year-old woman in their custody have pleaded guilty to receiving a bribe and “official misconduct” for having sex with a teenager inside a police van after a traffic stop in Coney Island, and will only serve five years of probation. (Gothamist)

16 fantastic Filipino restaurants. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 8, 2019 – The “Boycotting Mega Rich Trump Supporters is Messy Business” Edition

How to research apartment buildings, One World Trade’s scent, stand-out dishes in the West Village, Cuomo tries to change the gun conversation and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

How should the city’s justice system fight gun violence? The NYPD and Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez have differing opinions, and no matter how difficult it is for them to see eye-to-eye on the matter, no one can ignore that shootings are up 10% and gun arrests are up 91% in Brooklyn. (NY Times)

It was a mass panic in Times Square as people fled for safety, storming bars or theaters, literally anywhere to escape what sounded like gunshots. It was a motorcycle backfiring. (NY Times)

You might be surprised how many playgrounds are built on top of cemeteries. (Untapped Cities)

On Wednesday, the outrage machine was aimed at Stephen Ross, the billionaire behind the Hudson Yards whose company owns Equinox, who is hosting a fundraiser for President Trump this weekend to the tune of a quarter-million dollars per person. People are calling on Equinox members to cancel their memberships, but if you’re looking to boycott businesses Ross has investments in, you better make a list, because it starts with SoulCycle, Momofuku, Milk Bar, &pizza, Beyond Sushi, and Bluestone Lane before you get into the companies his company invested in. When it comes to the mega-rich, boycotting is a messy business. (Eater)

Interested in finding out who you know that donated to Trump? Here’s an easy set of instructions to follow to make family gatherings really awkward this year. (Splinter)

Now that the primary is officially over, Melinda Katz is focused on the Queens DA election. (amNY)

If we’ve learned anything from the Katz/Cabán DA primary battle, it is that all votes count in NYC and everyone has to be extremely careful to make sure they fill out their ballots, affidavit or not, properly. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is attempting to shape the Democratic Primary by asking all candidates to endorse a list of gun reforms including banning assault weapons, creating a database to prevent the mentally ill from purchasing weapons, expanding buybacks, and “red flag” legislation that would allow individuals to seek court orders preventing others from buying guns. (Politico)

After a brief suspension, @placardabuse is back on Twitter, documenting all the different ways that cars with parking placards regularly abuse the privileges their placards may grant them. (Streetsblog)

12 stand-out dishes to try in the West Village. (Eater)

Where does the water go when you flush? Easy question, complex answer. (amNY)

One World Trade’s observatory has a scent, and it’s there on purpose. (NY Times)

How to research a building before you move in. You don’t want the reason that two-bedroom apartment is cheap to be because of the awful history of bedbug infestations. (Curbed)

An interview with State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, Brooklyn’s last standing elected Republican. She’s running for Congress to try to unseat Max Rose, possibly leaving the entire borough solidly blue in the process. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Sunshine Cinema building on the Lower East Side has been completely demolished. (Curbed)

The woman who was arrested and had her one-year-old son pulled out of her hands for sitting on the floor at a benefits office has, as expected, sued the city, the officers involved, the HRA and the NYPD. (Politico)

The city’s taxi regulators voted to approve the cap on ride-hailing app vehicles and limited how long drivers can wait for fares in Manhattan. In six months, the commission will evaluate if they should issue new licenses. (Patch)

Finding a pool table at a bar is getting more and rarer, but the tables are far from gone. (amNY)

Last week a judge recommended Daniel Pantaleo be fired for using an illegal chokehold that lead to Eric Garner’s death. One week later the protests have begun as the mayor has remained silent and the city waits for action from commissioner James O’Neill. (amNY)

The DOT announced a speed-up in the timeline for installing protected bike lanes on 4th Ave in Brooklyn, connecting Bay Ridge to Park Slope and will do so by the end of this year. While the city will never get Em Samolewicz back after she was killed by a driver in Sunset Park, her death isn’t going without action from the city to protect other cyclists from meeting the same fate. (Curbed)

A fund to honor Em at Third Root Community Health Center is being established that will welcome trans women & trans femmes to receive healing services from Third Root at no cost. Em was an admin staff member since 2016. (GoFundMe)

A farm? On Staten Island? Yes, and it’s part of the amenities. (The Real Deal)

Raising the minimum wage for restaurant workers hasn’t hurt the restaurant industry as a whole, despite protests to the contrary every time it’s proposed. (amNY)

A group of rent-stabilized tenants in the Lower East Side and Williamsburg are accusing their landlord of continuing with eviction harassment, illegal overcharges, and preferential rent hikes—despite New York’s recently passed rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

Thousands of children, parents and staff members from the Harlem Children’s Zone marched in this year’s Children’s March for Peace. The match started after an elementary school girl was hit with a stray bullet inside her apartment 25 years ago and with the recent rise in gun violence across the city and country, its message is needed more than ever. (amNY)

The mayor announced $9 million to revitalize social services in Brownsville in response to the recent mass shooting for anti-gun violence programs, to enhance response times from the Brooklyn Action Center, youth education programs, to hire more staff for the recreation center, and more. Last week Jumaane Williams called for more funding and not police to address future problems in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 12 hottest lunch spots right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 7, 2019 – The “A Bizzaro World Financial District” Edition

Gun violence in the city is up, the 14th St busway can move forward, James O’Neill says the decision about firing Daniel Panteleo is difficult, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Tiffany Cabán conceded to Melinda Katz in the Queens DA primary. (amNY)

National Grid is denying new service for restaurants in the city who need natural gas until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation approves a natural gas pipeline that was rejected over water quality concerns in May. (Bedford + Bowery)

If you read the quotes about the Financial District in this Times article about the “Village-like quality” to it, Next Wednesday’s news will be saturated with child sex abuse lawsuits. Under the Child Victims Act, adult victims of child sex abuse will have one year to file lawsuits as the age to file changes from 21 to 55 moving forward. Catholic dioceses, the Boy Scouts, hospitals, and schools are all expected to be on the receiving end of hundreds of lawsuits. (Gothamist)

A woman in Queens’ complaints about her state trooper neighbor’s air conditioner resulted in her being arrested twice and strip-searched, according to a lawsuit against the neighbor, 14 members of the NYPD, and the city. (Patch)

When Bill de Blasio’s daughter moved to Gracie Mansion from an apartment in Brooklyn, she had help from her personal NYPD security detail. According to Citizens Union, having police detectives assist in this would be a violation of the city’s Conflicts of Interest Law. Another violation to add to the growing pile. (NY Times)

Portions of the old Kosciuszko Bridge are being used to form an artificial reef off Fire Island as part of the state’s artificial reef program. Also buried at sea was pieces of the Staten Island Expressway. (Untapped Cities)

Barneys filed for bankruptcy and will close 15 of its 22 stores, but its Madison Ave store will remain open. (NY Times)

It was the focus of a 30 Rock Episode (“Sun Tea” S04E06) and countless other sitcoms. Is it okay to combine two apartments? (StreetEasy)

An NYPD sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two fellow officers, claiming he was told to “go back to where you belong” and that they prevented his career from advancing due to his age and nation of origin. (Gothamist)

On August 8, Burger Kings across the city (and country) will make the Impossible Whopper available for purchase. Where else you can find the Impossible Burger in the city. (Grub Street)

An NYPD judge recommend he be fired, there have been protests for five years calling for his firing, the speaker of the city council has called for his firing, the governor says he should be fired, you can add Elizabeth Warren’s name to the list too, but NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill calls his decision about the cop who used a banned chokehold against Eric Garner that resulted in Garner’s death a “difficult decision.” (Politico)

Special education should be taken from the Department of Education and moved into the oversight of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to Bronx City Councilmember Andy King. The resolution follows 7,500 due process complaints against the DOE and a lawsuit against the DOE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The restraining order against the 14th St busway has been lifted and the city will move forward with its 18-month pilot program on August 12. (Gothamist)

City Councilmember Costa Constantinides is calling for the MTA’s pilot program of installing netting under aging and elevated trains in Queens to be expanded to the entire elevated stretch of the N and W lines. There have been multiple reports of falling debris and construction ephemera, including the car that was impaled on Roosevelt Ave by a wooden beam. (Curbed)

Murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny, and auto theft are down 4% across the city this year, but gun violence is up over 5%. (Patch)

De Blasio scored an impressive 6%, but not in voters who would prefer him as a presidential candidate. 6% of people say he was the worst performer during the Democratic presidential debates. His support is still below 1%. (Politico)

Self-driving cars at the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched, but not without a minor mistake. One of the vehicles reversed into another car. The kicker? It was being driven and was not in self-driving mode at the time. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

NYPD school safety officer Edward Peterson was arrested for allegedly forcing a teenager to perform oral sex on him back in 2013. (Bklyner)

Contact with the NYPD may be bad for your health. Poor physical and mental health, hypertension and binge drinking are all more prevalent among people who have been abused by police, put behind bars or on probation or parole than those who have not, according to a report by the city’s Department of Health. (Patch)

The Metropolitan Opera and Conductor James Levine settled their lawsuit over Levine’s firing after multiple allegations were made of sexual misconduct. The settlement was out of court, so no details are known. (NY Times)

Do you have an idea of how to improve the city’s waterfront? Bring your ideas to a Waterfront Planning Camp on Governor’s Island on August 17 from noon to 4. (amNY)

A guide to surviving the summer in Williamsburg. (6sqft)