The Briefly for April 8, 2020 – The “Attention Art Thieves: Please Stay Home” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Speeding is up, the mystery of the Anti-COVID-19 Volunteer Drone Task Force, the era of polite social distancing is over, and more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 63˚ Rain in the morning.

We are past politely asking for social distancing. We are in the “get the f**k back” era of NYC during COVID-19. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city is cutting this year’s summer youth jobs program, removing 75,000 minimum wage jobs from the city’s job pool. (Reema Amin and Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

A look at the building, and rebuilding, and rebuilding, of the Gowanus Canal bridges. (Joe Enright for Red Hook Star-Revue)

It’s been two months since Mayor de Blasio nominated Victor Calise and Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez to the MTA’s board, but Governor Cuomo hasn’t submitted them to the state senate, which is now in an indefinite recess. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

At least 1,167 MTA workers have tested positive for the coronavirus, 33 have died, and 5,604 others have self-quarantined because they are showing symptoms., essentially crippling the MTA’s ability to operate. (Christina Gildbaum for NY Times)

Attention art thieves: please stay home. (Colin Moynihan for NY Times)

One of the USNS Comfort’s crew members tested positive for COVID-19. That didn’t take long. (Lara Seligman for Politico)

Cathedral of St. John the Divine is the largest cathedral in the world, and fo Easter this year it will become an emergency hospital for up to 200 in partnership with Mount Sinai Morningside Hospital. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A guide to restaurants selling their wine cellars. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

This year’s Obie awards, which celebrates Off Broadway and Off Off Broadway theater, will be broadcast online this year, and the money intended for the production will be given to the artists whose plays couldn’t be staged. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

From a warehouse to your door, portraits of the people keeping restaurants coming. (Gary He for Eater)

Automobile traffic is down 30-35%, but speeding is up 12%. Who are these assholes? (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

The city will be releasing data on the racial breakdown of coronavirus cases that will show racial disparities among those who are affected by the pandemic. (Elisha Fieldstadt for NBC News)

The “Tenant Safe Harbor Act” is an effort from the state to prevent a tidal wave of evictions once the eviction moratorium is lifted. The bill would give tenants six months after the moratorium to catch up on their rent. It’s not perfect, but it’s a step in the right direction. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The official Met gala is postponed forever, so maybe an online-only gala from an unaffiliated Twitter account is a good idea? They’ll be using this year’s theme, “About Time: Fashion and Duration.” Can’t wait to see all those outfits inside a bedroom that’s been very lived in for two months. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Brooklyn’s got a new cookie delivery service. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

“In short, the mayor had no interest in doing anything real, and he created something destined to fail.” A look at Mayor de Blasio’s doomed open streets program. (Gersh Kuntsman for Streetsblog)

The FAA is looking into whoever was behind the “Anti-COVID-19 Volunteer Drone Task Force” that was out yelling at people with a drone over the weekend at East River Park. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The city will start to report suspected COVID-19 deaths alongside the confirmed cases This would include New Yorkers that die at home without a positive test. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

40 restaurants that are giving back. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thin sliced large-bore salami, Portuguese rolls, chourico, hot roast beef, and more. In praise of the “Meat Sandwiches” at M&O Market in the Village. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 17, 2020 – The “Order A Cocktail With Your Take Out” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor was forced into making the decision to close the schools, Barclays Center workers will be paid during the NBA shut down, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 54˚
Light rain in the morning.

Ample Hills Creamery filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, citing cost overruns on its Red Hook factory. Ample Hills has taken $12 million in investments since 2015. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

A woman who was handcuffed by the NYPD during active labor before her son’s birth, as well immediately following delivery, has filed a civil rights lawsuit against the city, saying the incident made her feel “less than human.” (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

An alternate subway map from 1939, which included a plan for the D train to go to Staten Island and the N train going to LaGuardia. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)


Here is a crowdsourced document with resources for everyone ranging from medical and mental health resources, virtual tours, places to donate, etc. (Thanks to Ariana for sending this in)

Caveat, the nerdy and quirky venue on Clinton St in Manhattan, will be streaming its programming this week, including Let’s Play with Comedians with Mark Vigeant tonight (Tuesday) at 7pm. (Caveat)

Tonight Puccini’s “La Bohème” will be streaming for free from the Met Opera tonight. You can catch Bizet’s Carmen until 3:30pm. (Met Opera)

Veselka in the East Village is offering buy one get one for Tuesday. Give them a call if you’re interested. (@veselkanyc)

The city is offering grab and go lunches for students and to aid in remote learning the city is providing as many laptops as possible to households with no internet connectivity. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

What you need to know about NYC’s school closures. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Wu-Tang has some advice about how to Protect Ya Neck Against Coronavirus. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Most co-working facilities are closed. WeWork remains open. But why? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

John Oliver is on hiatus, but not without putting the entirety of his last show for HBO on YouTube. (Last Week Tonight)

Mayor de Blasio has done some stupid things in his time as mayor, but this might take the cake. Despite everything going on, this dope was driven 12 miles to the YMCA in Park Slope to get one last workout session in, despite telling the city to assume that we have already been exposed to the virus. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The response to the pandemic shows us all what is possible but just doesn’t happen. Yes, bars and restaurants are shut down, but now you can order a cocktail to go with your meal. Anything that’s sold behind the bar can also be ordered. This is a good moment to tell you to order directly from the restaurant. Yes, Seamless is easier, but we are in a moment where every small business in your neighborhood needs every dime possible to stay afloat. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The impact of COVID-19 on the city’s economy is likely to be worse than 9/11 with over half a million people losing jobs in the tourism and hospitality sectors alone. (Patrick McGreen for NY Times)

The city’s nightlife industry accounts for $35 billion in revenue, with workers earning $13 billion. There is no timeline for reopening. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s crackdown on electric bikes is on hold. Now would be an excellent time to make them legal instead of illegal, but accepted. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Workers at the Barclay Center will be paid lost wages during the NBA shutdown. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: The Gotham Bar and Grill closed for good on Saturday Night, and they celebrated with a party full of a lack of irresponsible social distancing and a disregard for the long-term consequences for it. (Gary He for Eater)

You’re home, you have your favorite restaurants or bars on the mind. If you’re looking for a way to show your support, get a gift certificate. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

As we learn, the mayor didn’t come to the decision to close schools and bars and gyms himself, he didn’t trust the advice of the people closest to him either, he was forced into the decisions by his staff and a rebellious teacher’s union. (Jeffery C. Mays and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A Department of Correction staffer who tested positive for COVID-19 died on Sunday evening, one of seven deaths of coronavirus patients reported in New York state so far. They supposedly had limited contact with people in custody. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Some photos of Lower Manhattan looking very empty. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: This is what Carroll Gardens looks like during the pandemic. Hopefully showing people what these areas look like without people in them reduces anyone’s need to go to these places. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

Are cancelations newsworthy anymore? Reading through an endless list of things closing or being postponed shows just how much is happening in the city on a regular basis and none of it is happening this year. The Met Gala has been postponed indefinitely. (Vanessa Friedman and Jessica Testa for NY Times)

Get your grocery shopping done and don’t wait until the store’s last listed hours on their Google Maps listing. Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Stop&Shop, and Aldi are reducing hours. As one Trader Joe’s employee put it, it’s like the day before Superstorm Sandy every day for the last three weeks. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Despite everything else being up in the air, there have not been any service changes for the MTA. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the evolving and regularly infinite job of a group station manager for the MTA in the time of a pandemic. (Andy Newman and Earl Wilson)

The Brooklyn Arts Council organized a digital booklet of resources on healthcare, newly available funding, organizing tips, and other critical information for artists. (The Brooklyn Reader)

New York may soon need 18,000 ventilators, right now it’s 15,783 short. The federal government has a stockpile of ventilators, but President Trump’s literally response to a call for them was “try getting it yourselves.” Encouraging. (Brian M. Rosenthal and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A statewide suspension of evictions is in place indefinitely, as all non-essential functions of the courts have been postponed until further notice. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Judges, ICE prosecutors, and immigration lawyers are all asking for the same thing. Shut down the immigration courts. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

18 picks for restaurants offering new takeout and delivery options. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 8, 2019 – The “The Subway Psychic and El Bloombito Returns!” Weekend Edition

A push to lift the street vendor cap, the end of the food hall gold rush, the pumpkin smasher arrested, the Rockefeller Center tree is on its way, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Just as your schedule is really getting busy, here comes a weekend of heavy subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Finding Keano, New York’s most elusive subway psychic. (NY Times)

Monday is Veterans Day, here is what will be closed as a result of either the holiday or the Fifth Avenue parade. (Patch)

The return of El Bloombito!!! (@ElBloombito)

Have you ever heard Mayor Bloomberg try to speak Spanish? Then you’ll understand why Rachel Figueroa-Levin’s Twitter parody account exists. (Salon)

Mayor Bloomberg’s possible announcement that he will be joining the Democratic presidential candidates can mean one thing. (Patch)

5 NYC buildings that changed American history. (NY Times)

There are an estimated 20,000 food and non-food street vendors in the city, but the number of permits has been capped at 5,100 since the 1980s. State Senator Jessica Ramos wants to bring the city’s rules about street vendors into the 21st century. Her bill would lift the cap but also enforce the rules and permitting on everyone and allow municipalities to decide where vendors could and couldn’t set up shop. (Gothamist)

Five reasons to lift the street vendor cap. (Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: Twelve bathrooms, an indoor pool, eleven thousand square feet, a glass elevator, six floors, a theater, glassed garage, and the former home of Lady Gaga. All yours for $18 million. (StreetEasy)

Going deep with Jacqueline Novak on the success and bringing her show ‘Get On Your Knees’ back to Off-Broadway. (Gothamist)

Bumper. Cars. On. Ice. (amNewYork)

Photos: Inside Flushing’s Hindu temple, completed in 1977, which possibly makes it the first in the country. (Gothamist)

Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Here is where you can see pieces of the wall in the city. (6sqft)

You can either go to FAO Schwarz, or you can book the $3,000/night suite at the Conrad New York Midtown, which is filled with FAO Schwarz toys where you can order toy room service and get a private shopping tour of the store. (6sqft)

Where to eat or order Thanksgiving dinner in NYC. (Grub Street)

The idiot who jumped into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo was arrested on Wednesday night. Myah Autry faces two charges of criminal trespass and turned herself in. (Patch)

If the Hot Duck has taught us anything, it’s that bird watching in the city is cool again. Photos of the hawks on Governors Island. (Laura Goggin Photography)

“Brutal” and “uncomfortable to watch.” Tina: The Tina Turner Musical is not getting the highest of praise. (amNewYork)

The Bay Ridge pumpkin smasher has been arrested. He was pulled over for a tail light and the NYPD allegedly also found cocaine in his car. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The National Transportation Safety Board issued a series of recommendations to increase bike safety in the US, but the only one people are focusing on is mandatory helmets. A mandatory helmet law would effectively kill all bike sharing programs in the city, but the mayor would rather tell all cyclists to wear helmets than fix the roads to make them safer for everyone. (Gothamist)

Earlier in the week I poked fun at how many food halls are opening across the city, but there are some early indicators that the “gold rush” over food halls is ending. (Eater)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is cut and on its way to the city. It should be arriving on a flatbed on Saturday. (Untapped New York)

10 NYC residential buildings with the best amenities for dogs. (6sqft)

The Met Gala theme for 2020 is conceptual at best and straight up confusing at worst. About Time: Fashion and Duration? Yup. (Gothamist)

The court battle over control of WBAI is ongoing but the station has returned local programming to the airwaves. (Patch)

The sudden appearance of an armored ICE vehicle on a residential street sparked panic in Ridgewood on Thursday. Turns out it wasn’t a random immigration arrest, but part of a federal investigation into someone hoarding about 50 guns including a machine gun, gun parts, and ammunition. (Gothamist)

Another dunk on Trump from Attorney General Letitia James and New York state. This time around the president was hit with a $2 million penalty for persistently using the Trump foundation for illegal activity. (Patch)

Take a look inside the last occupied apartments inside the Chelsea Hotel. (NY Times)

As winter creeps towards us every year, the same feeling of dread overcomes the city as it tightens its muscles in fear and anticipation. SantaCon is coming. Steer clear on December 14th. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s best diner breakfasts, according to the staff of the Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Photos: BRIC After Dark at the Knockdown Center. (The Briefly)