The Briefly for May 31, 2019 – The “Stuyshwick? This is a Joke, Right?” Edition

The weekend subways, the NYPD has been lying to the public about rape numbers, a look at the art in the echoes of the Stonewall Inn riots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions have been pretty light for the last few weeks. That ends this weekend with 13 different subway lines carrying some variety of change in service to kick off June. (Subway Weekender)

The NYPD has been lying to the public for years about the number of rapes committed in NYC. While telling the public there were 6,626 rapes in a four and a half year span, they told federal officials there were 10,649 rapes. What the hell is going on with the 38% discrepancy? The NYPD only reports vaginal penetration as rape, not anal or oral. This would preclude the inclusion of any rape committed against men from this number. With this uncertainty, the one thing that is clear is that the NYPD is setting itself to fail when it comes to cases of rape in the city. (Gothamist)

Oh god. Someone is sincerely trying to make Stuyshwick a thing (where Bushwick and Bed-Stuy meet on Broadway under the J train). Anyway, here’s a “guide” to the “neighborhood.” (Grub Street)

Whoever thought of this moronic name should look back to 2013, when BEDWICK topped Time Out’s list of the dumbest fake neighborhood names. (Time Out)

After nearly a decade in the making, a pedestrian bridge replacing the Rector Street bridge finally open this fall. (Curbed)

Seven places to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman today. (Untapped Cities)

The City Council approved two bills aimed at making streets safer. One will hold the DOT accountable to add safety design elements to any street being redesigned and the second would require any contractors to create temporary bike lanes when disrupting any pre-existing lanes. (Curbed)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 9 appears to be on the verge of falling apart, as the search to fill the empty since 2015 role of district manager was about to be debated, three board members staged a walkout. The walkout resulted in less than a quorum, ending the meeting immediately. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Everyone wants a say in the Gowanus rezoning, the latest voice to want a seat at the table is the EPA. (Curbed)

The beginning of the end of the MetroCard officially begins today. (Gothamist)

If you’re confronted with an OMNY screen, here’s how to use your phone to pay for your subway ride. Until it is available at every station you can only pay per ride. (Patch)

You’ve probably heard that the city’s water is the cleanest of anywhere in the state. It’s not a rumor. It’s the truth. (Patch)

A look inside the $5.5 million makeover of Central Park’s SummerStage. (amNY)

Brace yourself, this one’s got a sad ending. The eight-month-old puppy who escaped his harness and jumped down onto the subway tracks at Herald Square was found dead near where he first escaped. Marley’s human companions are blaming the MTA. (Gothamist)

Seventeen years after the cleanup of Ground Zero was completed, a modest ceremony was held at the new Memorial Glade dedicated to the people whose related illnesses and deaths have followed in the subsequent years. (NY Times)

Following yesterday’s assessment of how NYU and Columbia’s neighborhoods are fresh hell when it comes to renting, here are the most affordable neighborhoods for fresh college graduates. (Curbed)

It’s the city’s fanciest McDonald’s, three stories tall, walls of glass, and open 24 hours a day. (Eater)

“Tastes of Brooklyn” is coming to Crown Heights’ Franklin Ave this Sunday, a street that inspired a joke of a podcast. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The city’s Lyft and Uber cars cause more pollution than cabs, thanks to the city’s hybrid fleet. The city’s 13,500 taxi emissions dropped 82% in 15 years. (Gizmodo)

Gravity knives are no longer illegal in New York. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Measles cases are at a 25 year high, with more than half of the nation’s cases being in the city. (NY Times)

The World Pride Mural Project Initiative has brought a new Buff Monster mural at the corner of Chrystie St & Broome St to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. (Brooklyn Street Art)

As we roll into June, the city’s streets, art galleries, and museums are focusing on the art centered on the riot/rebellion/resistance/uprising at the Stonewall Inn 50 years ago. The Times’ co-chief art critic looks at the historical significance that moment at the Stonewall Inn has had and how it has reverberated through art for half a century. (NY Times)

The BQX is such a pipe dream that advocates are pinning their hopes on a Democrat taking over the presidency in 2021 so the project has a remote chance of receiving the $1.3 billion necessary to cover just under half of the cost of the project. (Gothamist)

17 LGBTQ landmarks of Greenwich Village (6sqft)

Stolen: One orange bearded dragon. (Gothamist)

Behind the scene photos from Hart Island: The city’s mass burial ground. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to Jacob Riis Park Beach for the summer of 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go on a Saturday when you want to do something but don’t have plans. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 1, 2019 – The “Baby Come Back, You Can Blame It All On Me” Edition

The mayor is growing increasingly oblivious, MetroCards have an expiration date, open letters to Jeff Bezos, Citi Bike adds new electric bikes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you’re taking the 6 this weekend, you’re in the clear. If you’re taking literally any other subway, you should check the closures and services changes. (6sqft)

Raise a glass to the 19 restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health last week. (Patch)

Luna the bodega cat has been returned! (Gothamist)

We have a population of thousands of people who’ve been forgotten.” Queensbridge residents are grappling with the new reality of an Amazon-less Long Island City. (Patch)

Some people won’t take no for an answer. Long Island City’s John Brown Smokehouse owner Josh Bowen flew himself to Seattle in hopes of saving the Amazon HQ2 deal. (QNS)

He wasn’t alone. Governor Cuomo has been on the phone to Jeff Bezos multiple times in the last two weeks trying to get Amazon to reconsider. (NY Times)

A letter from a recently purchased Long Island City condo to Jeff Bezos. (McSweeney’s)

An open letter to Jeff Bezos from the Partnership for New York City in a full page ad in The New York Times. (NY Times)

The subway token lasted 50 years, the MetroCard took over in 2003 but won’t make it past 2023. (Patch)

The first LGBTQ group to ever march in the 44 years of the Brooklyn’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade will be the Brooklyn Irish LGBTQ Organization. (Patch)

There are two kinds of people in the city, the people who have been to Winnie’s in Chinatown and then there’s everybody else. Winnie’s has a new home at 58 East Broadway four years after its closing with Winnie and her children Jamie and Teddy at the helm. (Eater)

Are you ready for cat yoga? (Bklyner)

Revenge porn is officially illegal in New York. The state legislature unanimously passed a bill making it illegal to attempt to defame and humiliate someone by illicitly releasing photos or videos. Google and Facebook have lobbied against earlier versions of the bill. (Gothamist)

An interview with the new Public Advocate after two days on the job. (Gothamist)

Here’s how Jumaane Williams won the special election. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The FDNY has to buy “spit hoods” to protect medics from being spit on, but the purchase was delayed because the original hoods made the medics look too much like members of the KKK. (NY Post)

The good news: The city will get 4,000 new pedal-assisted electric bikes. The bad news: They will cost an additional $2 per ride. (amNY)

The de Blasio administration is installing 42% less than Mayor Bloomberg’s administration, while the city has seen a 70% growth in daily bike trips. (amNY)

The city’s official map of legal bike parking locations. (NYC.gov)

Is there any point in staying in NYC if you’re introverted? (r/AskNYC)

The mayor is increasingly oblivious. This week he rode the subway and seemed surprised to discover just how exasperated New Yorkers are with their inability to get to where they are going without delays and hassles and endless anxiety.” Ouch. (NY Times)

No goals, no benchmarks, no accountability, but it costs $250 million a year. It isn’t clear what Chirlane McCrazy’s ThriveNYC initiative has accomplished. (Politico)

City Councilmembers are calling for a parking permit system North of 60th St to defend the neighborhood against the inevitable hordes of drivers trying to circumvent the city’s planned congestion pricing. (Crains)

Where to go on a double date. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for October 12, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Biggie Smalls Way, the NYPD’s Lasso Gun, and More

The MTA is still expecting a half billion dollar plus budget gap by 2022, 13 haunted NYC locations, the city’s teachers have a new contract, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Seriously, today is the deadline for voter registration if you’re going to vote in the November 6 election, and you’re going to vote in the election, right? Right? (amNY)

Plan ahead, because the MTA planned another game of “is my subway running this weekend?” All the weekend’s scheduled subway changes. (6sqft)

MetroCard Vending Machines will be unable to take credit or debit cards starting tonight at midnight until tomorrow at 5am. Just another headache to add to your weekend transit nightmare.

Community Board 7 requested a two way protected bike lane on Central Park West. This is a direct response t the death of Australian Tourist Madison Jane Lyden. (West Side Rag)

What did the city get for the $4.5 billion spent on the Hudson Yards? (Gothamist)

The MTA is ready to build four new Metro North Stations in the East Bronx, but Amtrak is holding the project hostage, demanding a ransom of “access fees” for the use of their rails. The MTA is already paying $1 billion to upgrade the system. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The secrets of the former Bell Labs Research Facility, now known as the Westbeth Artist Housing. (Untapped Cities)

A garbage truck hit and killed a 37-year-old man on the corner of Brooklyn Avenue and Eastern Parkway on Thursday morning. The driver, Aaron Gilchrist, was charged with failure to yield to a pedestrian, driving in the wrong direction on a one-way street, and failure to exercise due care. (NY Post)

You can’t bike the perimeter of Manhattan because of multiple gaps in the greenway. The city is planning to invest a quarter billion dollars to close that loop and add 15 new acres of open space. Construction is expected to be complete in 2021. (6sqft)

NYPD officer Vincenzo Trabolse was caught on video repeatedly punching and tasing a 24-year-old William Colon, who has severe medical issues and was in handcuffs at the time. An internal affairs investigation has been opened. (Gothamist)

The same artist who got the city to install the “Respect” tributes to Aretha Franklin is trying to get St. James Place between Gates Ave and Fulton Street Christopher Wallace Way after Biggie Smalls. (Brooklyn Paper)

“Despite an infusion of $836 million in state and city funds, there has been little improvement so far in subway service.” -NYC Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Despite fare increases in 2019 and 2021, the MTA is projecting a budget gap that will balloon to over half a billion dollars by 2022, and that doesn’t include the $40 billion needed to enact the fabled 10-year Fast-Forward plan. (NY Post)

How much waste is created by one Manhattan loft renovation? No matter how much you guess, the answer will be more. (Gothamist)

The 13 places in the city you didn’t know were haunted. (Thrillist)

The NYPD is testing a “lasso gun” to use to subdue suspects. (Gothamist)

The city and the United Federation of Teachers reached a preliminary $2.1 billion, 43-month contract that will include more money for hard-to-staff positions, pre-screening of teachers, a $25k innovation fund per school, and more. (Politico)


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