The Briefly for July 18, 2019 – The “Act Like a Summer Goth to Stay Cool” Edition

There have been two additional ConEd blackouts this week, will electric scooters raise real estate prices, hidden bookstores, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the landlords challenging the new rent reforms. (The Real Deal)

Did you know you can see pieces of the Berlin Wall in the city? There’s a piece in an office building, another in Ripley’s Believe It Or Not, another on the Intrepid, but three sections stand together in the United Nations’ garden. (Untapped Cities)

The mayor is “jaded” over ConEd. This follows the Staten Island outage, the Upper West Side outage and a third reported outage in Coney Island all in the same week. He urged New Yorkers to set air conditioners at 78 to help lighten the load for everyone. (amNY)

We have entered the stages of a heat emergency across the city. The official advice is that if you don’t have to be outside or in the sun, pretend you’re a goth teen and stay indoors. If you don’t have air conditioning, the city has 500 cooling centers you have access to. (Curbed)

El Chapo was sentenced to life in prison, putting his career in crime and also the woes caused by his constant crossing of the Brooklyn Bridge to travel between prison and the courthouse under police escort, to an end. (NY Times)

Here’s a map of the city’s cooling centers. (6sqft)

The night that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldren stepped foot on the moon, there was a viewing party in Central Park. The “Moon-In” showed just how moon-crazy the city had gotten. (6sqft)

Nothing quite like a rush-hour breakdown of MetroCard machines to really instill confidence that the MTA will get the OMNY contactless payment right. The MetroCard systems stopped accepting credit cards and the MTA’s Twitter account announced the issue five minutes after it was fixed. Great job all around. (Patch)

When the plastic bag ban takes hold, it only pertains to grocery and big-box stores. Some advocates say it doesn’t go far enough, but the city will feel the collective pain together in March. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The story of BK Yoga Club, an inclusive, body-positive yoga studio in Dumbo, run by Alicia Ferguson and Paris Alexandra. (Bushwick Daily)

The city firefighter that was arrested last month for being caught on video seemingly trying to run over a cyclist is back on the job following his one-month suspension. Further disciplinary action may follow. (Streetsblog)

The top ten hidden bookstores in the city. (Untapped Cities)

This seems like a great weekend to have brunch reservations in order to minimize the amount of time spent waiting for a table outside. 30 great brunch spots that take reservations. (The Infatuation)

Take a look inside Pomander Walk with this house for same, the exclusive 1920s Tudor-style gated community on the Upper West Side. For a bit over $2 million, it can be yours. (6sqft)

The chief business officer at the electric scooter company Lime was boasting that access to electric scooters means more access to bikes and scooters would mean the city would become more accessible, which raise real estate prices. Is that an argument for or against scooters? (The Real Deal)

Seen a bunch of Waldos around the city today? There’s a reason for that. (amNY)

The Time Out Market food hall had its doors shut by the Department of Health after it failed a restaurant inspection and hasn’t re-opened since. They are working to address the issues pointed out by their 102 point violation before they can reopen. (Brooklyn Paper)

At this point, nothing the mayor says or does should be able to disappoint us, but he keeps finding new ways to do instill a feeling of malaise to anyone who hears him speaking. The latest eye-roll comes from calls to have Officer Daniel Pantaleo fired for his role in Eric Garner’s death. (NY Times)

Gossip Girl is already being rebooted. (Huff Post)

There have been at least eight ICE raids across the city in the last five days. Do not open your doors for law enforcement if they do not have the proper paperwork to compel you. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

20 standout restaurants and bars in Prospect Heights. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 14, 2019 – The “A Plan To Save Us All From the Sea” Edition

The religious exemption for vaccines is ending, a ball-pit bar is coming to Brooklyn, the weekend subway service changes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This is the end of the religious exemption from vaccines in New York state. The legislature agreed on a bill and the governor has said he would sign it to prevent future public health crises similar to the current measles outbreak. (NY Times)

It’s the weekend, so usual “check the subways before you go anywhere” rules apply. (Subway Weekender)

Get to know your Queens District Attorney candidates. (Queens Crap)

Jon Stewart, New York’s collective voice, had a heck of a week. It opened with shaming Congress, which resulted in moving the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund moving forward, and ended with an extremely personal gift from some grateful firefighters. (Gothamist)

The United States Army Corps of Engineers released a series of plans to save New York from when the sea rises up to eat us. Each of the proposals will cost billions of dollars and would dramatically change the city’s coastline. A plan will be selected either later this year or early next year. The plans range from a 25-year construction that would cost over $100 billion to nine years and cost about $15 billion. (Curbed)

The park at Essex Crossing in the Lower East Side is now open. (6sqft)

A 4-alarm fire broke out in Midwood that injured twelve and spread through three houses and was caught on fire. Three firefighters were among the twelve. (Gothamist)

Sometimes justice moves slowly. Elizabeth Lederer, the lead prosecutor in the Central Park Five case, will not return as a lecturer at Columbia Law School after the release of Netflix’s “When They See Us.” (amNY)

Here are the important points of info you need to know about the new rent reform package. (Gothamist)

There’s more to Coney Island than Nathan’s and Totonno’s. 9 places to eat in Coney Island, but honestly, all you need to know is Dona Zita. (Eater)

The 11234 zip code, where you can find Bergen Beach, Mill Basin and Flatlands, has more baby boomers than any other zipcode in the United States. The city has 14 of the top 20 zip codes for boomers, with the city holding the top four spots. (Patch)

The old Coffee Shop in Union Square is going to become a Chase Bank. (Gothamist)

There’s an office tower in Manhattan unfortunately named “Penn15.” (The Real Deal)

Where to eat a last minute dinner in the East Village. (The Infatuation)

The people in the city’s homeless shelters are treated like numbers and the employees of the Department of Homeless Services appears to be abusing “emergency” transfers to move people around for seemingly no reason. (NY Times)

Is El Museo del Barrio turning its back on the local Latinx community? The Mirror Manifesto, an open letter signed by artists, was read while protestors occupied the museum’s 50th Anniversary celebrations. (Gothamist)

Starting July 1, the NYPD will take a different tact with people who are homeless on the subway and commit minor infractions. Instead of a summons, they will be sent to a detox facility, shelter, or to get other kinds of help as needed. The purpose of the pilot program is to divert people away from the court system and to work to minimize subway disruptions, which had tripled in the last few years. (Patch)

Remember the most expensive apartment in the city? The one that came with two tickets two space, a yacht, two full-time servants, and a bevy of other amenities that seemed too good to be true? Turns out it was a fake and a marketing tactic for the building. The listing was a combination of about a dozen different apartments on the 45th floor. (Curbed)

What’s the best time of year to look for an apartment in the city? StreetEasy broke it down neighborhood by neighborhood, and we’re heading into the worst time of year for most areas. (Curbed)

It might not be surprising that the neighborhoods with the most excessive airplane noise are in Queens, with Brookville, Howard Beach, and Flushing topping the list. (Localize.Labs)

If you’ve fallen in love with the MTA’s new rainbow transit heart, you can find it on some of the city’s 1 trains and on MetroCards. Five subway trains are sporting the MTA Pride logo and you can get special edition World Pride MetroCards at a few select subway stations. (Gothamist)

The unofficial MTA Pride Train signs are back across the city. (amNY)

Turns out dads can be stay-at-home parents too! Who knew? (amNY)

There’s coffee and then there’s coffee. Sawada, a Tokyo-style cafe, is “one of the most genuinely inspired additions to the New York coffee scene in some time.” (Eater)

The Barclays Center announced a free summer concert series featuring Andy Suzuki & The Method, Nappy Nina and Dj Donwill, DJ Mick, and more. (The Brooklyn Reader)

An analysis from the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs indicates that the president’s immigration policies are having a chilling effect on immigrants using SNAP benefits. The rate of non-citizens dropping out of the program is four times higher than citizens dropping out. (NY Times)

Let’s ask the scary questions. How safe is the elevator in your building? (the Real Deal)

Let’s all say farewell to the small superheroes of NYC, with the last season of Jessica Jones closing out The Defenders’ run on Netflix. Daredevil, Iron Fist, Luke Cage, Punisher, and Jessica Jones were New York City’s heroes and the fun game of where was that filmed?” will have to be reserved for re-watches. (amNY)

They don’t make subway stations like they used to. This time it was Atlantic Terminal that saw a crumbling ceiling along the D, N, R tracks. This incident can be attributed to a non-MTA contractor puncturing the ceiling while taking a soil sample above ground, but add it to the list of inconveniences we all absorb on a daily basis. (amNY)

A ball-pit bar is coming to… no not Bushwick, but very close to it. (Gothamist)

Inside the NYPL’s Stonewall exhibition. (Gothamist)

This week in NIMBY news: The homeless shelter on Billionaire’s Row has cleared a legal hurdle but the neighborhood continues to fight against it. (Curbed)

In more NIMBY news, Community Board 2 has overwhelmingly voted against the mayor’s Rikers Island neighborhood replacement. (Brooklyn Paper)

The Grub Street guide to the summer’s “Can’t-Miss” food festivals. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 23, 2019 – The “Who is the Super-villain Destroying Our Commutes?” Edition

Gentrifying neighborhoods belong to rats, the NYPD adds nearly 300 officers to the streets, everyone hates Bill De Blasio and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The story of a community response that saved Prospect Heights’ Ode to Babel bar from becoming a victim of the NIMBY-ism that comes with gentrification. (Grub Street)

It all started with the arrest of Michael Cohen. A look behind the scenes at the full year and 450 interviews from The New York Times‘ investigation into how taxi medallions ever became worth $1 million. (NY Times)

Who is the city’s supervillain pulling emergency brakes on subways and destroying our commutes? Whoever it is, they’ve been doing it for months, and possibly tears, without getting caught. (Jalopnik)

Here’s how the NYC Care Card works and what it does and does not entitle you to. (Norwood News)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is testing her political capital with an endorsement of Tiffany Cabán for Queens District Attorney, who also received endorsements from the Democratic Socialists of America, Real Justice PAC, and the Working Families Party. The primary is June 25. (NY Times)

Eight is great… unless that’s the percent of people polled who have a favorable opinion of you. Mayor de Blasio’s national favorability rating is below the president’s and the worst among anyone running for president. (Patch)

One thing that gentrification brings to a neighborhood? Rats. You may have read about the block in Prospect Heights where the rats have basically taken over, but it’s becoming a trend across the city. As more buildings have construction done, it displaces rats by destroying their burrows, forcing them to come to the surface. (NY Times)

A guide to the OMNY, which starts its slow takeover of MetroCards in 8 short days. (Curbed)

New York City is last on the list of popular destinations for retirees to live. About 15,000 seniors moved out of the city from 2016 to 2017. The top places are, unsurprisingly, Florida and Arizona. (Patch)

Video: Here’s how you can help to compost with food scrap drop-offs. (Viewing NYC)

A city council proposal to exempt yellow cabs from congestion pricing is short-sighted and foolish, according to experts. Politicians are blaming the fees for a declining number of rides and not a combination of continued congestion on the roads and app-based alternatives that make yellow cabs less desirable. (Streetsblog)

Don’t look now, but there are more vegan options in the city than ever and chefs are working to lure unsuspecting non-vegans to the dark side. Even fast food chains like Burger King and Taco Bell are getting onboard with plant-based options. (amNY)

The city’s news moves pretty fast. Blink and you’ll miss the rest of the story. What multiple people thought was a woman dressed as a character from “The Handmaid’s Tale” on the verge of committing suicide turned out to be a folded up red umbrella. (Gothamist)

Congrats to Washington Heights’ Maelyn Jarmon for winning season 16 of The Voice. (amNY)

Everything you need to know about raising chickens in NYC. (6sqft)

It’s time to take a look at President Trump’s tax returns. A bill passed the state’s legislature on Wednesday that would allow the state to hand the President’s state tax returns to Congress. The governor has voiced support in the past and is expected to sign the bill shortly. (Patch)

Google purchased another building in Chelsea to expand its footprint and keep on target to double the number of employees in its New York offices in the next ten years. (amNY)

The “LGBT in 2021” campaign is aimed at getting better LGBTQ representation into the City Council. (amNY)

All five borough presidents joined over 70 early childhood providers and Comptroller Scott Stringer in calling on the city to scrap its plans for pre-K and early childhood programs and start over saying the current plan would weaken the city’s social safety net and hinder community-based organizations to provide early education programming. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The “Summer All-Out” program will send almost 300 additional NYPD officers to high-crime areas in an attempt to reduce homicides and violent crimes. (amNY)

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