The Briefly for September 27, 2019 – The “MTA Buses Will Vaporize You Car with Lasers” Weekend Edition

The City Council looks to silence nighttime construction, Juumane Williams leapfrogs the mayor, no one believes in the MTA Capital Plan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check this weekend’s subway disruptions before you head out this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Construction noise keeping you up at night? You’re not alone, and the City Council is looking into limiting construction work because the Department of Buildings’ approvals doesn’t seem to be taking neighborhoods into consideration. As you could imagine, the real estate lobby isn’t thrilled with this using the “it’s necessary for a growing city,” but last I checked the city is contracting, not expanding. (NY Times)

Have you seen the ads showing the MTA’s new bus lane enforcement that seemingly installs a car-destroying laser aboard every bus? (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to deal with 911 calls that deal with emotionally disturbed individuals was supposed to be announced on Wednesday, but the day came and went with no announcement. Public Advocate Jumaane Williams isn’t waiting for the mayor and released his own plan on Thursday. (The City)

The Port Authority will raise tolls, AirTrain ticket prices, and fees for being picked up at the airports by taxis or for-hire vehicles like Ubers or Lyfts. (Curbed)

Tshombe Selby went from usher to performer at the Met Opera for the current production of Porgy and Bess. (amNY)

The city neglected to inspect nearly 10,000 buildings for lead that housed nearly 12,000 children with blood lead levels above the federal standard. Over 2,700 of those cases came after the city was aware of other cases in the same building. An investigation from City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed a breakdown in the city’s bureaucracy that allowed these conditions to exist and for landlords to get away with these violations. (amNY)

The 25 essential places to drink wine in NYC. (Eater)

A look at Inwood, what the Times calls “Manhattan’s last affordable neighborhood,” which will last as long as people like the Times doesn’t write about it being affordable. (NY Times)

The mystery of the 8’x7′ oil painting hanging in Cortland Alley has been solved, its artist is Diana Wege and the painting is a part of her Earth Requiem series. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city’s Commission on Human Rights released new legal guidance which offers some of the strongest protections against discrimination based on immigration status and national origin in housing, the workplace, and in places like stores, restaurants, schools, and gyms. Telling someone to “speak English” or “go back to your country” in any of these settings would violate the guidance and comes with a fine for up to $250,000. (Patch)

The city’s most exciting new burgers. (Grub Street)

Photos: Inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one month before its chapter as Brooklyn’s next destination. (Curbed)

The Nets unveiled a new court to play on, “inspired by Brooklyn.” (6sqft)

The MTA Capital Plan was approved by the MTA’s board unanimously, but no one seems confident that the plan that was voted on is the plan that will be enacted. (Gothamist)

Evon Stephens was sentenced to five years in prison for starting the 2018 fire in the Kings Plaza Shopping Center garage that injured 25 and damaged 135 vehicles. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A Wagner College professor on Staten Island told one of his classes that he wanted to shoot the students in another one of his classes in the head and he was “locked and loaded.” He’s also suspended and under investigation. (Gothamist)

The Queensboro Bridge bike lane and pedestrian situation is more evidence the mayor’s Vision Zero plans don’t have teeth. (Streetsblog)

This story of a feud between two neighbors that has it all. Mannequins, spy cameras, defamation, and a ten million dollar lawsuit. (Gothamist)

Milkshake squirrel, Lollipop Raccoon, etc. A ranking of all of the “move over, Pizza Rat” stories. (Gothamist)

One of the hardest questions to answer. “Where should you go to eat in New York?” The Times attempts to tackle it. (NY Times)

A new damning report from the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General shows the Metropolitan Detention Center’s heat outage last winter in the coldest week of the year was caused by mismanagement and not fire and lists out all of the ways different ways issues were failed to be addressed. (Gothamist)

The world’s oldest barber, Anthony Mancinelli, is dead at 108. (NY Times)

Dr. Glenn Payne, a fake neuropsychologist, swindled at least $30,000 out of patients. Dr. Payne was the best he could come up with? (Gothamist)

15 best dumpling spots in the city. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

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The Briefly for February 5, 2019 – The “Goose-Related Subway Delays” Edition

A possible CBD ban, State Senator Michael Gianaris could end the Amazon HQ2 deal, State of the Union protests, the hardest job in NYC, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at two of the State of the Union protests planned across the city. (amNY)

There were some goose-related delays on the Q train on Monday afternoon. (NY Post)

The 9/11 Memorial & Museum will add a section in May dedicated to people who died or became ill with 9/11-related illnesses. (Curbed)

10x TONY award winning “The Band’s Visit” will end its Broadway run on April 7. (NY Times)

The state saw an unplanned $2.3 billion drop in income tax revenue, which will force the state to curb spending. In some parts of the city, that’s called an “Amazon sized hole.” (NY Post)

New York City’s lack of cash crops ended slavery. In 1790, African Americans accounted for over 30% of Brooklyn’s population and most were enslaved. (Greenpointers)

10 new art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Hope. Love. Utopian. Finding optimism on city streets. (6sqft)

A rundown of the wave of laws that followed new blue wave in the state’s legislature. (NY Times)

A 72-year-old cyclist was killed in a hit-and-run while riding in the bike lane on Eight Avenue at 45th St. It was the second cyclist death in three days. (Gothamist)

The state’s Public Authorities Control Board isn’t well known, but it could kill the Amazon HQ2 deal. The state senate appointed the anti-Amazon Senator Michael Gianaris to sit on the board, of which any of the three members can veto the project. (The Real Deal)

Get your CBD-infused food and drinks now, because the Department of Health may be banning its use as a food additive. (Eater)

Jennifer Irigoyen, 35-year-old real estate agent and fitness instructor, was stabbed to death in her Ridgewood apartment building around 1am on Sunday night. Irigoyen a was five months pregnant and no arrests have been made. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit calls the conditions at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park are a “a humanitarian crisis,” according to a lawsuit filed by the Federal Defenders of New York. (Gothamist)

The arguments for and against landmarking the Strand Bookstore. (West View News)

The city is moving to fire the security officer who pulled Jazmine Headley’s 1-year-old son from her arms at a Brooklyn benefits center in December of last year. A second officer has resigned. (NY Post)

Clothing and accessories by cat people for cat people to promote feral cat awareness. Yes, they’re in Bushwick. How’d you know? (Bushwick Daily)

A man with MS-13 affiliations was arrested in connection to the shooting on the 90th St-Elmhurst Avenue 7 train platform. (NY Times)

The City Council is considering a foie gras ban. (Gothamist)

Is Netflix’s “Russian Doll” an allegory for Tompkins Square Park? (Gothamist)

After the first day of deliberations, the jury has not come to a verdict in El Chapo’s trial on day one. (amNY)

A 16-year-old 92nd Street Y camp counselor says she was blacklisted after she accused an older counselor of sexual assault. (NY Post)

If you thought your job was hard, meet Pete Tomlin. As NYC Transit’s new modern signal chief, Tomlin is responsible for modernizing 90% of the subway’s signals. Good luck Pete, you’ll need it. (amNY)

15 restaurants that “feel like Japan.” (Eater)

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