The Briefly for June 19, 2020 – The “Here Comes Phase Two” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Ways to honor Juneteenth, a true bike lane for the Brooklyn Bridge is possible, NYC’s latest notable racist, the Rent Guidelines Board vote, and more

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 78˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 68˚ High: 79˚

A guide to Juneteenth marching, mourning, picnicking, and dancing. (Emmy Freedman and Erin O’Brien)

We’re only at the tail end of phase one, but why are some people acting like we’re past it all? (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

It’s official, we’re headed to phase two on Monday. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

What this also means is that outdoor dining returns on Monday. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Let’s hope we don’t see more clusters of idiots hanging out outside bars in large groups drinking and eating. Governor Cuomo has expanded the power os the State Liquor Authority to revoke or suspend liquor licenses for restaurants and bars that don’t enforce proper social distancing rules. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The Department of Transportation is in talks with Mayor Bill de Blasio to study turning a roadway on the Brooklyn Bridge into a bike lane. Someone check to see if hell’s frozen over yet. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

There will always be people who naysay transportation evolutions. In Flushing, Queens, the businesses on Main Street are the ones making a stink about it. (Dan Rivoli for NY1)

Remember when the city pledged to bring a bike-share program with 1,000 dockless bikes to Staten Island? Bike sales are up, Citi Bike usage shot up in May, and Staten Island remains the only borough without any bike-share program. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Video: Relax with a tour through the blooming roses at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Who should have the power in the process of approving liquor licenses? Should it be the community board, which represents the people of the neighborhood or a business improvement district, which represents local businesses? The Lower West Side Partnership is attempting to muscle its way into the decision making process. (Bowery Boogie)

The scandals at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park are too long to list. Most recently inmate Jamel Floyd died after being pepper-sprayed in the face. New reports are surfacing that inmates are being confined to their cells nearly 24 hours a day and have provided very little response to Covid-19. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

The mayor has the talent to make people hate him. Two different City Councilmembers put forward different resolutions for his removal by Governor Cuomo, one because he did too much to maintain order during George Floyd protests and another because he didn’t do enough to maintain order. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

The MTA’s influence goes far beyond NYC. The MTA’s budget is spent in all but one of the continental US states, meaning the MTA’s finding is also America’s funding. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

I Need More, the boutique owned by the late Jimmy Webb, will be (closing for good at the end of July. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Rents will freeze for roughly 2 million New Yorkers with rent-regulated apartments for the next year to help ease the financial burden of the novel coronavirus pandemic. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Rent Guidelines Board vote, explained. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Photos: Photographer Peter Schafer’s portrait series of New Yorkers in mask. (Howard Halle, photos by Peter Schafer for Time Out)

Meet Elisa Crespo, the trans candidate looking to succeed Richie Torres as a Bronx City Councilmember. Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Ready to start riding a bike? Check out these nine tips from cyclists. (Monica Torres for HuffPost)

It’s been over a year since the death of Layleen Polanco and there still haven’t been any significant reforms around solitary confinement. One of the reasons reforms stalled was Mayor de Blasio’s opposition to them. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

New York State’s 118 billionaires increased their net worth by an estimated $44.9 billion, or 8.6 percent, from March 18 to May 15. More than 100 state legislators won’t approve any spending cuts without raising taxes on the wealthy. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The City Council passed a ban on police chokeholds the mayor said he’ll sign, despite weeks of his arguing for an exception for potentially fatal situations. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Say hello to Abraham Knofler, the city’s latest noted racist. He’s the guy who stood outside of Burly Coffee in Bed-Stuy for at least eleven minutes arguing that their Black Lives Matter sign was somehow offensive. IT’s a miracle that he didn’t get his ass beaten. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Did you know that New York City has a “Rat Row?” Well due to the city’s restaurants being closed, Rat Row has been expanding. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

If you’re looking for a mud-slinging primary, look no further than the 43rd Assembly district contest between incumbent Diana Richardson and former State Senator Jesse Hamilton. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Looking for more nature in your life? Here are 10 Forever Wild nature preserves in the city. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Get ready, because New York City is entering phase two of reopening on Monday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

16 books about New York City by Black authors. (6sqft)

If you’re formulating an escape for Rikers Island, how do you get to freedom? IF you’re the inmate who tried to escape on Thursday, you try to swim across the East River. Sadly, they didn’t make it without being caught. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

It felt like we just rid ourselves of the Islanders, but they may be coming back. The owners of the Nassau Coliseum indefinitely closed the arena, leaving the team with nowhere to play their home games. With no other options, the Isles could come back to Brooklyn until their new home at the Belmont Racetrack is constructed. (JT Torenli for Brooklyn Eagle)

More than 50 New York lawmakers called for Gov. Andrew Cuomo to strengthen his eviction ban extension, which ends on Monday. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The Naval Cemetery Landscape is once again open to the public for those that want a moment of respite and also one surrounded by buried bodies. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Association of Jewish Camp Operators is suing Governor Andrew Cuomo over his closure of sleepaway camps this summer, arguing the order violates their constitutional rights of the free exercise of religion. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

If the idea of spending the summer with your kids is daunting (or terrifying), the Times has some idea of how to entertain your kids. (Alexis Soloski for NY Times)

City Councilmember Donovan Richards is calling for the removal of NYPD officers from school security duties. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

The NYPD has vacated Carl Schurz Park after blocking access for no good reason. (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

The City Council passed the POST Act, which will require the NYPD to reveal information about their arsenal of surveillance tools, which include stingray devices, drones, facial recognition, and more. The mayor is expected to sign the bill into law. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

45 ice cream shops open for summer 2020. (Regan Miles for amNewYork Metro)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 27, 2019 – The “MTA Buses Will Vaporize You Car with Lasers” Weekend Edition

The City Council looks to silence nighttime construction, Juumane Williams leapfrogs the mayor, no one believes in the MTA Capital Plan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check this weekend’s subway disruptions before you head out this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Construction noise keeping you up at night? You’re not alone, and the City Council is looking into limiting construction work because the Department of Buildings’ approvals doesn’t seem to be taking neighborhoods into consideration. As you could imagine, the real estate lobby isn’t thrilled with this using the “it’s necessary for a growing city,” but last I checked the city is contracting, not expanding. (NY Times)

Have you seen the ads showing the MTA’s new bus lane enforcement that seemingly installs a car-destroying laser aboard every bus? (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to deal with 911 calls that deal with emotionally disturbed individuals was supposed to be announced on Wednesday, but the day came and went with no announcement. Public Advocate Jumaane Williams isn’t waiting for the mayor and released his own plan on Thursday. (The City)

The Port Authority will raise tolls, AirTrain ticket prices, and fees for being picked up at the airports by taxis or for-hire vehicles like Ubers or Lyfts. (Curbed)

Tshombe Selby went from usher to performer at the Met Opera for the current production of Porgy and Bess. (amNY)

The city neglected to inspect nearly 10,000 buildings for lead that housed nearly 12,000 children with blood lead levels above the federal standard. Over 2,700 of those cases came after the city was aware of other cases in the same building. An investigation from City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed a breakdown in the city’s bureaucracy that allowed these conditions to exist and for landlords to get away with these violations. (amNY)

The 25 essential places to drink wine in NYC. (Eater)

A look at Inwood, what the Times calls “Manhattan’s last affordable neighborhood,” which will last as long as people like the Times doesn’t write about it being affordable. (NY Times)

The mystery of the 8’x7′ oil painting hanging in Cortland Alley has been solved, its artist is Diana Wege and the painting is a part of her Earth Requiem series. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city’s Commission on Human Rights released new legal guidance which offers some of the strongest protections against discrimination based on immigration status and national origin in housing, the workplace, and in places like stores, restaurants, schools, and gyms. Telling someone to “speak English” or “go back to your country” in any of these settings would violate the guidance and comes with a fine for up to $250,000. (Patch)

The city’s most exciting new burgers. (Grub Street)

Photos: Inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one month before its chapter as Brooklyn’s next destination. (Curbed)

The Nets unveiled a new court to play on, “inspired by Brooklyn.” (6sqft)

The MTA Capital Plan was approved by the MTA’s board unanimously, but no one seems confident that the plan that was voted on is the plan that will be enacted. (Gothamist)

Evon Stephens was sentenced to five years in prison for starting the 2018 fire in the Kings Plaza Shopping Center garage that injured 25 and damaged 135 vehicles. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A Wagner College professor on Staten Island told one of his classes that he wanted to shoot the students in another one of his classes in the head and he was “locked and loaded.” He’s also suspended and under investigation. (Gothamist)

The Queensboro Bridge bike lane and pedestrian situation is more evidence the mayor’s Vision Zero plans don’t have teeth. (Streetsblog)

This story of a feud between two neighbors that has it all. Mannequins, spy cameras, defamation, and a ten million dollar lawsuit. (Gothamist)

Milkshake squirrel, Lollipop Raccoon, etc. A ranking of all of the “move over, Pizza Rat” stories. (Gothamist)

One of the hardest questions to answer. “Where should you go to eat in New York?” The Times attempts to tackle it. (NY Times)

A new damning report from the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General shows the Metropolitan Detention Center’s heat outage last winter in the coldest week of the year was caused by mismanagement and not fire and lists out all of the ways different ways issues were failed to be addressed. (Gothamist)

The world’s oldest barber, Anthony Mancinelli, is dead at 108. (NY Times)

Dr. Glenn Payne, a fake neuropsychologist, swindled at least $30,000 out of patients. Dr. Payne was the best he could come up with? (Gothamist)

15 best dumpling spots in the city. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

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