The Briefly for May 3, 2020 – The “Does Anyone Know Who is in Charge?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A focus on multiple ways that the mayor seems to have abandoned his leadership role and abdicated control of his city and more

Today – Low: 66˚ High: 81˚
Heavy rain until evening.

Request an absentee ballot before June 16
Click and sign support for the repeal of 50-a
Donate to The Equal Justice Initiative and The Bail Project

The city remains on PAUSE, with 5/7 metrics met. We are expected to start phase one on June 8.

The recording of the NYPD on their radios saying “Shoot the motherf*****rs,” talking about protestors in Brooklyn.

The 8 pm curfew is now upon us, but it’s not the first time the city has been under curfew. Here are ten times New York City was under curfew. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped Cities)

Can restaurant delivery workers deliver food after curfew? Will people stocking shelves overnight be stopped and asked for paperwork? The state’s documentation says there are “no specific requirements for ID” when it comes to essential workers. It’s almost like this wasn’t well thought out. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

“I’d rather die than live in a world where this kind of violence is normalized. I’ll jump in front of a million police cars if I have to.” -Devin Khan, who was one of the protesters holding the barricade in front of an NYPD SUV on continued marching. (Virginia Breen for The City)

Who really runs the city? Yes, Bill de Blasio is our current mayor, but in his press conference on Tuesday, Governor Cuomo commented that he would be within his power to “displace” the mayor using emergency powers. If that wasn’t already a troubling enough statement, he also mentioned that the NYPD should use all 38,000 officers. For reference, there were 8,000 officers on duty last night. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Satire (or is it?): “De Blasio: ‘It Is An Honor To Have My Daughter Doxxed By The Greatest Police Force In The World’ (The Onion)

What will Mayor de Blasio say today when it comes to violence across the city? The mayor has shifted the blame on a daily basis. First, it was “out of town” agitators, then it was anarchists, then it was gangs and career criminals. On Tuesday he asked local leaders to “stand up for peace,” after it has become clear that his current approach of “the police will figure this out” is not working out. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Speaker Corey Johnson announced that the City Council will vote to finally make the chokehold illegal in June with a veto-proof majority and the mayor’s opinion does not matter. Under the bill, any technique that restricts the flow of air” will be a misdemeanor. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

When the NYPD wanted Citi Bike and Revel to shut down, the mayor obliged and sent the order. The directive arrived at 10:30 pm on Moday, 30 minutes before the curfew. On Tuesday, Citi Bikes started shutting down before 6 pm. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

New York City legally requires people arrested see a judge within 24 hours. It’s been that way for nearly 30 years. People arrested during the weekend’s protests spent over 24 hours in Manhattan without seeing a judge. To quote the president o the New York State Court Officers’ Association, “Everything is f*****d up.” (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

“Covering protests, especially chaotic ones, has always been tough. Reporters are used to getting jostled, taunted, and sometimes threatened with arrest. And while the level of aggression has been increasing in the last decade, the number of attacks of the past few days is far beyond anything we have ever seen before.”
– Judy Patrick, VP for editorial content at the New York Press Association for amNewYork Metro, Be outraged over police attacks on journalists in America

Black New Yorkers Talk About Their Fear in Public Space (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

New York Civil Rights Law section 50-A is a state law, the mayor’s support or non-support of its repeal means nothing, but that hasn’t stopped him from talking out of both sides of his mouth about it. He says he supports repeal but he is been responsible for its expansion since taking office. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A new report from the city’s Commission to Combat Police Corruption shows the NYPD’s disciplinary system regularly protects bad cops, including 11 of the 45 cases where the cops involved should have been fired. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Pride Month started with a vigil in Sheridan Square to remember LBTQ people of color lost to police violence as well as other Black Americans who died at the hands of police. (Donna Aceto for Gay City News)

“Opting to stay silent only suggests that [James] Dolan is compliant with the police brutality and systemic racism that has plagued the cultural landscape of this nation — a tone-deaf action considering his general manager is black and all but one of the players on the Knicks’ roster is black.”
Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro, Knicks owner James Dolan’s silence is part of the problem

There is a narrative that the looting that has accompanied protests is undermining the message, as this piece from amNewYork Metro’s Editor-In-Chief supposes. The way that looting is covered that undermines the message of the protests, not the looting. Yes, you’ll find photos of shattered windows and ransacked stores if you look for it, but you’ll also find photos of people in the streets whose hearts are broken and spirits have sustained much more damage than any building. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

There are always people looking to pervert the message of a protest. The owners of a Staten Island restaurant owners want to open early because people are violating social distancing rules at protests. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

The owner of the Nets, Joe Tsai, has agreed to extend his pledge to pay Barclays Center workers beyond its original date, paying 2,000 part-time workers. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Project)

Inside a $16,000 Covid-19 renovation of Christie & Co. Salon in Bayside. (Carlotta Mohamed for QNS)

Apartment Porn: A $2.3 million penthouse with a roof deck with a view of Billionaire’s Row. A perfect opportunity if you’re dying to regularly moon Billionaire’s Row. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at some of the work of Shelley Seccombe, a photographer who has documented the Greenwich Village waterfront since 1970. (Louisa Winchell for GVSHP)

The free food fridge in Bed-Stuy, set up by Thadeaus Umpster, is inspiring similar acts of kindness across the city. (Angely Mercado for Brooklyn Based)

Governor Cuomo will allow day camps to open on June 29th, including camps in the city. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

RIP Patricia Reed Scott, who helped bring TV and film production back to the city in the 80s and 90s. (Sam Roberts for NY Times)

Meghan McCain says her Manhattan neighborhood was “eviscerated.” But also? She’s a liar. What a doofus. (David Moye for HuffPost)

“If I didn’t have a primary, I wouldn’t care.” Congressperson Eliot Engel, who represents portions of the Bronx and Westchester, is a dipshit and is being challenged by Jamaal Bowman in the June 23 election. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Click here to request an absentee ballot for the June 23, 2020 election and primary. Do this before June 16.

Information on the NYPD’s shooting of an armed man in response to gunfire in Crown Heights. (Edgar Sandoval and Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs for NY Times)

The Metropolitan Opera canceled the rest of their performances for 2020 through New Year’s Eve. (Michael Cooper for NY Times)

10 organizations supporting the Black Lives Matter movement in NYC. (6sqft)

Thanks to reader Mike for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 16, 2020 – The “A City Without Restaurants and Bars” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor shuts down schools, bars, restaurants, and venues, bike riding is up, the story of Typhoid Mary, a walk through Central Park, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 47˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Everything is being canceled and it sucks, but it’s also the right thing to do. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“States cannot build more hospitals, acquire ventilators or modify facilities quickly enough. At this point, our best hope is to utilize the Army Corps of Engineers to leverage its expertise, equipment and people power to retrofit and equip existing facilities — like military bases or college dormitories — to serve as temporary medical centers. Then we can designate existing hospital beds for the acutely ill.” -Governor Cuomo, making the case for the Army to step-in during this national natural disaster. (Governor Andrew Cuomo for NY Times)

The city will shut down bars and restaurants on Tuesday morning. Bars, restaurants, venues, and nightclubs will close completely for an undetermined amount of time. Think about where you would want to go to eat or drink and ask if they have gift certificates. Give them money now without physically going to those locations. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Seamless has deferred commissions from independent restaurants, but is that enough to actually help restaurants? (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The city’s schools are closed until April 20. That doesn’t mean there’s no school, as remote learning is set to start on March 23. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

Weed dealers are cleaning up now that everyone is staying home and freaking out. (Matthew Schneier for The Cut)

The Food Bank for NYC has a GoFundMe page for people who want to help, but don’t knowhow. (Food Bank of NYC)

How to talk to kids about COVID-19, from Dr. Rebecca Berry, PhD, an NYU professor who is an expert in child and adolescent psychiatry. (Isabelle Bousquette for New York Family)

Videos: Here’s how the MTA is cleaning the subways. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Jing Fong in Chinatown, the city’s largest Chinese food restaurant, is temporarily closed. With the CDC recommending limiting nationwide gatherings at 50 people, there isn’t much place for a restaurant that seats 800. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Record Store Day has been postponed from April 18 to June 20. Let’s all hope it doesn’t need another postponement. No one wants to have to wait that long for their Britney Spears – Oops!…I Did It Again (Remixes and B-Sides) vinyl (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

“For the most part when I talk to my colleagues they realize that, yeah, this has the potential to be really serious on a systems level. All in all though, I’d say there’s a calm acceptance about how crazy it’s going to be.” An interview with an ER doc. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Last week late-night shows had plans to continue without audiences, but as of this week, nearly all of them are off the air. The exceptions are the shows filmed in Los Angeles. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Utilities in New York have suspended power, heat, or water shut-offs through the end of April. (Samantha Maldonado and Marie J. French for Politico)

Airbnb is allowing coronavirus-related cancellations without penalty. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Welcome to the Park Slope Food Coop: a COVID-19 “petri dish.” (Matt Troutman for Patch)

So the event you had tickets to was canceled, what now? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s libraries are closed to you in person, but there is plenty to be done online. (Jennifer Schuessler for NY Times)

The headline is “how NYC restaurant workers are getting help so far,” but I’m not naive enough to say that the entirety of the city’s 325,000 workers is actually getting help. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Catholics have had their obligations to attend mass waived by Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio. (Robert Pozaryski for amNewYork Metro)

“This is a moment we all knew would come. That doesn’t make it any easier.” -Bill de Blasio on the first New Yorker to die due to COVID-19, an 82-year-old woman from Brooklyn. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

State Assemblymembers Charles Barron, who represents East New York, and Helene Weinstein, who represents Canarsie and Flatbush, were diagnosed with coronavirus Saturday. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Queens borough presidential election has been postponed from March 24, with a rescheduled date to be announced. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)


These YouTube walks through the city, like this one through Central Park, might be a good way to seem like you’re going outside without actually having to go outside. (ActionKid)

ICE has expanded its inhumane arrest patterns as part of Operation Noble Guardian and is now making arrests at JFK airport. (Maxx Katz for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Opera is dark but they’ll be offering free HD streams every night for a week starting on Monday night. (Jasmine Ting for Paper)

Meet Jacqueline VanDusen, who wants to bike every street in Brooklyn. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

This might have been a list of restaurants with openings in the spring. Now it’s a list of restaurants that might open sometime soon. (Eater)

Typhoid Mary, New Yorker. If you don’t know her story, this seems like the perfect time to read up on how isolation can prevent the spread of disease. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Want a distraction from COVID-19? How about bed bugs? What do you know about them? Do you know things? Let’s find out. (StreetEasy)

Black city residents are jailed on Rikers Island for alleged state parole violations 12 times more than whites, while Latinx people are accused of parole violations nearly four times more. Just some of the gems in a new report issued by Columbia Univerity’s Justice Lab on the New York state parole system. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

A look at New York’s former quarantine islands and hospitals. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How screwed up is our healthcare system? If you need further evidence beyond “look around,” New York hospitals sued their patients 31,000 in the last four years. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

The first signs of real spring, migrating birds, are here. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Do starter homes exist in NYC? (Localize.City)

A look at Edgar Allan Poe’s farmhouse on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Subway ridership is down 20%, but CitiBike riding is up 70%. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

RIP Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, avant-garde music legend and industrial pioneer. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

The Briefly for September 25, 2019 – The “Worst Possible Possible Candidate for Mayor” Edition

The Strand sues the city, treating carbon emissions like money, the LinkNYC Teletubbies, the East Side Protection plan approved, vegan restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Strand will sue the city in federal court to try to remove the landmark status of its building with the idea that the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s decision is an unconstitutional taking of private property. (Gothamist)

Tomokazu Matsuyama’s mural on the Bowery Wall is one of the most complex murals I can recall for the wall and took two weeks for the artist and 10 assistants working 12 hour days to complete. (Downtown Express)

Donald Trump Jr has decided not to run for mayor of NYC, despite past comments and wanting to. (Jezebel)

Whoever dressed up a bunch of LinkNYC kiosks like Teletubbies, you are a hero. (Gothamist)

The real estate and development industries don’t have a unifying board or mouthpiece that speaks for them, so when it comes to huge issues like climate change and carbon emissions everyone’s voice is singular. Where does the industry that creates 75% of NYC’s 52 metric tons of emissions stand? (The Real Deal)

62-year-old MD Abul Bashar died from injuries sustained on September 18 from being hit by a Lomangino Brothers dump truck, making him the 23rd cyclist to be killed in 2019 by a vehicle on NYC streets. 2018’s number was 10. (Streetsblog)

The East Side flood protection plan was approved by the City Planning Commission, despite outcry from the public that the city’s timeline seems unrealistic. (Curbed)

The Midtown Dean & DeLuca is now closed, leaving only the flagship in Soho open. (NY Times)

3 million public parking spaces, or 12 Central Parks, worth of space being used as storage for private property. Maybe it could be put to better use? (Gothamist)

There are still many unanswered questions about the man who jumped in front of a 4 train holding his daughter on Monday morning. The latest reports say that the five-year-old daughter is physically unharmed while Fernando Balbuena-Flores was pronounced dead by the FDNY. (Gothamist)

The NYPD will enact multiple suggestions in an attempt to end suicides on the force, which includes 9 active and 2 retired members in 2019. The Department of Investigations suggested adding a wellness outreach unit with a psychologist, social worker, and police officer for every 1,000 officers, a training program to adjust to civilian life, and more. (amNY)

Swedish coffee chain Fika abruptly closed all seven of its NYC stores following a recent bankruptcy filing. (Eater)

Think you’ve got what it takes to become “Miss Subways?” Applications are being accepted through the 29th with the pageant taking place on October 3. (amNY

The city’s law that bans pre-employment drug tests for marijuana goes into effect in May 2020 and in the process will change HR policies nationwide. (amNY)

The City Council is poised to change control over Hart Island from the Department of Corrections to the Department of Parks and Recreation with a new package of bills. (Politico)

Chipotle employees in 20 locations all over the city went on strike on Tuesday over complaints of labor violations. Would you like illegal scheduling and denying extra pay with your burrito bowl? (Splinter)

The City Council will look at a bill that would treat our carbon emissions like our finances, taking inspiration from a model created by Oslo, Norway. (HuffPost)

In New York, it is a misdemeanor to claim to be able to use “occult powers, to answer questions or give advice on personal matters or to exorcise, influence or affect evil spirits or curses,” but it’s legal to do so “for entertainment purposes only.” Three spiritual advisors on the Upper West Side crossed over that line and owe their victims $60,000. (NY Times)

Amid a sexual harassment inquiry, Plácido Domingo left the Met Opera. (NY Times)

Williamsburg’s N 6th St is now the “hottest street” in Brooklyn when it comes to retail. (Bedford + Bowery)

19 rock-solid vegan restaurants in the city. (Eater)