The Briefly for April 23, 2020 – The “No One Cares Why You’re Leaving New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The City Council pushes forward with its open streets plan, an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights,” standout sushi takeout and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 53˚
Light rain overnight.

Despite the Governor’s orders, some hospitals are not allowing one support person in labor and delivery settings. (Virginia Breen for The City)

7 things you didn’t know about Central Park. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A look at the positive contributions of David Penepent, a mortuary sciences professor at SUNY Canton, who is helping with the transportation, care, and cremation of New York City’s dead during this pandemic. Very often you’ll hear about how bad of a job someone is doing in a moment of crisis, this is the exact opposite. (Alexandra E. Petri for NY Times)

15% of pregnant women in NYC tested positive for COVID-19 in a limited study in Manhattan over a two week period. The findings may give a better look into what’s happening with the general population and highlights a need for universal testing. (Bobby Cuza for NY1)

No cares about your “why I’m leaving New York” essay. That goes double during a pandemic. Just leave and take your guilt about leaving with you. (Claire Fallon for HuffPost)

A “plaque” was put up in Park Slope near Methodist Hospital by an unknown guerilla street artist honoring “grocery workers, nurses, hospital staff, doctors, mail carriers, immigrant laborers, and other true heroes” of the pandemic. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The City Council is looking for ways to resuscitate the city’s summer jobs program. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson pushed a 75-mile open street plan forward on Wednesday. Johnson and Council Member Carlina Rivera dismissed the mayor’s concerns about the plan as irrelevant. The mayor has recently blamed the failure of his open streets plan on New Yorkers. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The City Council introduced an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights” on Wednesday, which would require large employers to provide additional protections and hazard pay to those hourly workers helping the city continue to operate during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Christopher Robbins and Sydney Perreira for Gothamist)

Looking to make your Friday night Zoom hangout feel a little more regular? Check out Virtual Cheers, which in return for a donation to the staff of the bar will give you a photo of the bar of your choice. (Beth Landman for Eater)

The organizers of the city’s Pride parades have decided to collaborate to take their events virtual. Global PRide is June 27, but the city has already canceled all public events in June. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

What’s the first thing you’re gonna eat when quarantine is over? 21 famous New Yorkers on the first thing they’re gonna eat. (Alyssa Shelasky for Grub Street)

The mayor has continued to talk publicly about what it will take to reopen the city, including a “Trace and Test” program, which will move people who test positive into isolation, possibly in one of the 11,000 hotel rooms the city has set aside. Right now the city is aiming for 400,000 test kits per month, which isn’t nearly enough for the city’s 8.5 million people. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mayor Bloomberg volunteered to develop a contact tracing program for the tri-state area. Bloomberg Philanthropies has also made a financial contribution of $10.5 million through the Bloomberg School fo Health at John’s Hopkins. This is separate from the Mayor de Blasio’s plan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is looking to double the number of COVID-19 tests in the state, from 20,000 to 40,000. The 40,000 is “ambitious,” in his own words, with the state’s 300 labs working 24/7 to meet the demand for 20,000. At 40,000 a day, it’ll only take 13 and a half years to test the whole state. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

Foot Locker, H&M, Old Navy, Nordstrom, Party City, and The Gap, welcome to the non-rent paying party. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The underground, hydroponic farm on Worth St, Farm.One, is still operating, but its produce was originally intended for bars and restaurants. Now they are opening up orders to the public. (Tribeca Citizen)

This is a celebration that has to happen.” -Mayor de Blasio on the Fourth of July fireworks. Fourth of July is six days after NYC Pride was scheduled to end. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Bodega-inspired streetwear. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The MTA’s 250 construction projects are moving forward, albeit with some new safety precautions, being deemed essential. With so few people riding the trains, this may be the optimal time to get that work done.(Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Everyone’s made a mistake when ordering groceries, especially now, but what do you do with ten bunches of bananas or 1,200 coffee filters? (Madison Malone Kircher for Grub Street)

Where to get Mexican takeout and delivery in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

50 things the RESY staff misses most about New York. (RESY)

An interactive map of where to avoid where sidewalks make social distancing impossible. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Now remains a great time to adopt a dog or a cat. The Briefly home has two amazing toy poodles, Scooter and Pepper, and we couldn’t be happier. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

It’s like “ballet or break dancing on a bike.” Meet BMX champ Matthias Dandois, who is doing tricks inside his Tribeca apartment. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

Here is the recipe for Junior’s famous cheesecake from scratch. Now I know what I’m doing to try (and fail) this weekend. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Two NY housecats have tested positive for COVID-19, as well as four tigers and three lions in the Bronx Zoo. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Meet Jennifer Marino-Bonventre, an English teacher who is bringing some joy to the city with some fantastic sidewalk chalk drawings. (Debora Fougere for NY1)

The Times found out what the rest of us already knew: New Yorkers want cheap wine and a lot of cheap wine. (Alix Strauss for NY Times)

New York City, a city of winners, and Boston, which is a different city, have different sports teams, different coffee choices, different clam chowders, and two genetically different types of pigeons. (Joshua Sokol for NY Times)

22 standout sushi spots still open for takeout and delivery. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Eater)

Thanks to reader Melissa for today’s featured photo from the East Village.

The Briefly for September 10, 2019 – The “A Horrifying Nightmare Trip on Columbus Ave” Edition

The tribute in lights is killing birds, $90k of stolen cake, a guide to apple picking, more details about the Charging Bull banjo attack, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

San Gennaro kicks off on Thursday, and amNY has a guide for what you need to know and what you need to eat. (amNY)

The May Room, an art installation from Shantell Martin, has taken over Our Lady Star of the Sea, the military chapel on Governors Island, through October 27. This is the first time the chapel is open to the public in twenty years. (Untapped Cities)

While the amusement area in Coney Island is larger than ever, its neighborhood storefronts are struggling with the third highest vacancy rate in Brooklyn and sixth in the city. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There’s a jimsonweed bush growing on the Columbus Ave greenway at the corner of 93rd St. It’s an odd pick to be planted there, as jimsonweed is highly toxic when consumed. That’s not all. The plant can be made into a powerful drug that is easy to overdose on and if you survive you’re almost guaranteed a horrifying nightmare of a hallucinogenic trip that turns its victims into “zombies devoid of free will.” Avoid the plant. (Gothamist)

Is there nothing New York won’t add alcohol to? Taco Bell, ice cream, and now bubble tea. Bubbleology opens on the 16th in the East Village (Time Out)

A guide to picking apples near the city. (Patch)

This is such a bummer I’m surprised it didn’t come from Neil deGrasse Tyson. The Tribute in Lights, which takes place for a few days every year around the anniversary of 9/11, is killing thousands and thousands of birds. It seems that birds get confused by the light during their migration periods, essentially trapping them and preventing them from having the energy to finish their trip south. Since 2006, the tribute has ruined over a million birds’ flight patterns. (Splinter)

Think about cake. Now think about a lot of cake. Now think about $90,000 of cake. That’s how much cake a deliveryman stole from Lady M in Long Island City. (LIC Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. He joins City Councilmembers Brad Lander and Antonio Reynoso with his endorsement. Do you think it’ll get awkward when de Blasio finally fails out of the race and comes back to do his job in the city? (Patch)

Restoration on the World’s Fair Observation Towers in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will begin next month. If you’ve ever been curious what’s at the top of the towers, there are some photos. (Untapped Cities)

We’re no Hawaii, but New York state is the 15th “happiest” state in the country. At least we’re not West Virginia, right? (Patch)

Good news for the asphalt area in Tompkins Square Park, which is known as the epicenter of NYC skateboard culture. The city had originally planned to turn over the area while East River Park gets rebuilt to prevent rising sea levels from destroying Manhattan, but the Parks Department has changed its plans after an outcry from the community and a rally promoted by City Councilmember Carlina Rivera. (Gothamist)

Is NYCHA ready for the next Superstorm Sandy? After the 2012 storm, nearly 80,000 residents were without electricity for weeks. Seven years later, Comptroller Scott Stringer is questioning the de Blasio administration’s preparedness. (Curbed)

More details are starting to emerge about this weekend’s banjo-wielding attack by Tevon Varlack from Dallas on the Charging Bull statue. Repairing the statue will cost around $100,000. (Gothamist)

FlyNYON is already under federal scrutiny for its fatal 2018 East River crash which left five people dead. Now it’s attracting even more negative attention for its recent promotion offering dogs a spot in its doors-off helicopter rides around lower Manhattan. (Patch)

Here are the street closures for the 9/11 ceremonies this year. (amNY)

Photos from the Coney Island Beard and Moustache Competition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re yearning for the days of Mayor Bloomberg welcoming people into his administration with a handshake, an expectation of hard work, and a quiet “don’t fuck this up,” “The Many Lives of Michael Bloomberg” may be the book for you. (Politico)

The “where are people going out right now” guide. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for March 6, 2019 – The “Does NYC Pose a Risk to Our Mental Health?” Edition

Corey Johnson’s State of the City, a dominatrix gets bullied, the worst place to store a dead body, new monuments to women, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Parking is difficult enough in the neighborhood around Columbia University before the NYPD decides to vacate a street just so they have somewhere to park during their flag football game. This is what abuse of power looks like. (NY1)

Manhattan’s 6 1/2 Ave turns 6 1/2 years old this month. (Untapped Cities)

Do we live in a city because we’re crazy or are we crazy because we live in the city? (Scientific American)

A ode to Pacific Standard, the Park Slope Bar slated to close this month after 12 years, and their trivia night. (Grub Street)

84 of the nation’s 607 billionaires live in New York City. The city’s richest resident also happens to be the former mayor. (Patch)

Speaking of Michael Bloomberg, he’s announced that in 2020 he will… not be running for president. (Huffpost)

Fair fares will be expanded to all eligible residents by 2020. (6sqft)

Landlords are always coming up with new ways to harass tenants, with the latest being a Ditmas Park “Ten Commandments” with a three strikes and you’re evicted policy. (Gothamist)

Watch Corey Johnson’s full State of the City address. (CBS New York)

Corey Johnson is ready to break the city’s car culture and is calling on Mayor de Blasio to lead, follow, or get out of the way. (Streetsblog)

Corey Johnson likely wants the mayorship in 2021, but before that he laid out a plan to have the city take control of the MTA. (Patch)

For those brave enough, here is the full 104 page plan from the City Council Speaker. (nyc.gov)

What to see in New York art galleries right now. (NY Times)

Are we ready for BAT? That’s Big Apple Transit, which would control entities previously managed by the MTA. The org chart is frightening. (6sqft)

Just when you thought the special elections were over! The Attorney General’s election caused a need for a special election for the Public Advocate, which is now causing a special election for the City Council for Brooklyn’s district 45. Whew. (amNY)

This is how fatbergs are born. (Gothamist)

The NYPD left a dead man sitting on the Herald Square subway platform partially covered plastic for an hour during the morning commute. (Splinter)

Don’t forget the MTA’s usual way of storing dead bodies – the employee’s break room. (Inquisitr)

Mapping the success of Artists & Fleas from a garage in Williamsburg to SoHo, Chelsea, and Los Angeles. (amNY)

Industry City isn’t big enough for its owners, who are pushing the city to rezone the area. A new rezoning would allow Industry City to more than double in size, including a pair of hotels. Neighborhood groups oppose the expansion, noting that the warehouses are currently supporting blue collar jobs and removing those jobs from the neighborhood would also remove the families that have been there for decades. (Curbed)

What does it take to bully a dominatrix out of a neighborhood? (Patch)

Yeshiva Kehilath Yako on Wilson Street refused to comply with the health department’s order not to send unvaccinated children to class and 21 cases of measles were traced back to the yeshiva. (Patch)

She Built NYC unveiled plans for four new monuments of Billie Holiday, Elizabeth Jennings Graham, Dr. Helen Rodríguez Trías, and Katherine Walker. The monuments are expected to be completed by 2022. (amNY)

Where to get a burger at the bar by yourself. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.