The Briefly for May 21, 2020 – The “Is This Guy A Complete Idiot?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city struggles to keep yeshivas closed, 19 organizations helping essential workers, 10 lesser-known picnic spots, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 61˚
Clear throughout the day.

More and more, people are waking up to the realization that whatever the city looks like after this is all over, it doesn’t have to be what it was before this started. Manhattan President Gale Brewer wants an expanded Street Seats program and less parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

“Do you have reservations? No? Please leave.” Is reservations only the future of restaurants? (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Is Dr. Mitchell Katz, the head of the city’s public hospital system and also the city’s tracing system for Covid-19, a delusional idiot? He made mention that everyone should do what he did to help his ailing parents and just find an apartment in your building to put her in instead of a nursing home. Everyone has the ability to do that, right? Just pay for another apartment and also maybe hire a caretaker. What do you mean he’s making $700,000 and you’re not? Just get a $700,000 a year job and then you’re all set. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It looks like Michael Cohen may serve the rest of his prison sentence at home thanks to an early release over Covid-19 concerns. (Benjamin Weiser, Katie Benner and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is planning a mid-August reopening “or perhaps a few weeks later,” which is a lot of wiggle room. Whenever they reopen, the rest of the year will have additional social distancing requirements with the hope that things can be relaxed sometime in 2021, when the Met Gala might also return. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The city’s politicians and advocacy groups are beginning to share one message to the mayor, and that is when we open up, we have to stop using streets for cars and let businesses and people take over the streets. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

19 organizations helping essential workers in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The NYPD dispursed three yeshivas that had illegally opened up for classes and gatherings on Wednesday and were issued “polite warnings.” The mayor was pushed about this on Inside City Hall with Errol Louis, who asked him if he had “some kind of political understanding with the leaders of the Orthodox community that there would basically be no enforcement around this?” The mayor insisted they are receiving no special treatment, despite multiple pieces of evidence that gatherings are happening regularly. Let’s not forget that the mayor’s wife has aspirations of running for Brooklyn borough president. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Child vaccination rates plummeted 63% as Covid-19 spread across New York City. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City landmarks will be lit up green tonight in honor of the parks workers. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The 10 best lesser-known spots for a lovely NYC picnic. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Monty for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 20, 2020 – The “A Museum That Delivers Ice Cream” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Rent strikes do not get the mayor’s support, the best Indian takeout, the City Council moves to give 75 miles of city roads to people and bikes, and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 56˚
Overcast throughout the day.

“What a week.” “It’s Monday morning.” Breweries and bars delivering craft beer. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Wearing face masks when it’s not possible to socially distance is now a requirement. (Share Weaver for Time Out)

The Times asks the hard-hitting question: Are face masks the new condoms? (James Gorman for NY Times)

Come back when your nose and mouth are covered.” The new MTA mask awareness campaign is pretty on point. (Brandan Krisel for Patch)

A museum that delivers? Yes, if that museum is The Museum of Ice Cream. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

What’s it like to set up one of the dozens of refrigerated trailers across the city acting as temporary morgues? Here’s the experience of Erik Frampton, who took a temporary job in a truck that can hold 110 bodies at a time. (Arun Venugopal for Gothamist)

11 numbers that show how the novel coronavirus has changed NYC (Corina Knoll, Azi Paybarah, Jacob Meschke and Elaine Chen for NY Times)

We’ve all developed a weird habit or two while staying at home. Leigh Plessner can’t stop buying artisanal jams. (Leigh Plessner for Grub Street)

Video: #SoundTheHorn for transit workers in Grand Central Terminal. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio: “I don’t agree with a rent strike.” (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Mayor de Blasio is going to be forced to open up the city’s streets to pedestrians and cyclists. A bill in City Council is moving forward this week as Mayor de Blasio might be forced to actually let the people of the city stretch out a little bit. This will, of course, push the mayor beyond his pathetic open streets idea that collapsed within a week. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Video: Comparing what a walk down Broadway pre- and mid-COVID-19 outbreak. (ActionKid)

One of the prisoners being released into home custody because of COVID-19 concerns? Michael Cohen. (Benjamin Weiser and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Jeff Bezos bought a fourth apartment at 212 Fifth Avenue for $16 million, bringing his total investment in the building to $96 million. $16 million for Jeff Bezos is the equivalent to $9.50 for an average American family in 2018. (Laura Vecsey for StreetEasy)

55 years and 37,000 historic designations all in one interactive map. Now you can see the history of the Landmarks Preservation Commission in one place. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development requested on Friday that owners of city-funded buildings with income-targeted housing allocate up to 30 percent of those apartments for homeless people. (Sam Raskin for Curbed)

20% of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have taken place inside of nursing homes, and the nine nursing homes with the highest body counts are in the city. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

One thing that is pushing forward like nothing is wrong is health inspections, but no fines are being issued. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Video: “Suck my dick” isn’t exactly what you’d expect to hear from the megaphone of an NYPD officer, but here’s the video anyway. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know about the city’s remote learning plan since it looks like students will be remote learning for the rest of the year. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

A photographer with a license to fly drones from the FAA had his drone confiscated by the NYPD for trying to film the mass burials on Hart Island. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The MTA is facing an $8 billion loss, but that won’t stop it from hiring all 500 new subway cops this year, costing an additional quarter billion over four years. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Temporarily the NYPD will be focusing more on the subways and private security is being hired due to a 55% rise in crime while ridership plummets. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Anything happening in May has been canceled in the city and June isn’t looking so great either. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

June events being canceled means that this year’s Pride March is in doubt. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Also on the chopping block for June is the Puerto Rican Day Parade. (Michael Scotto for NY1)

Apartment Porn: 21-foot-high ceilings, carved marble fireplaces, and built in 1873. An $8 million Upper East Side townhouse that feels like an Italian chateau. I don’t know what an Italian chateau feels like, but I’m trusting their opinion here. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The city’s enforcement of the plastic bag ban has been delayed to June. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Video: How far will $1,200 get you in the city? (Patrick Mulligan for NY City Lens)

While things are still bad when it comes to COVID-19, there are small signs of improvement. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork Metro)

New Yorkers can get married and it can happen online. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Where to get Indian takeout and delivery. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Annie for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 23, 2019 – The “Who is the Super-villain Destroying Our Commutes?” Edition

Gentrifying neighborhoods belong to rats, the NYPD adds nearly 300 officers to the streets, everyone hates Bill De Blasio and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The story of a community response that saved Prospect Heights’ Ode to Babel bar from becoming a victim of the NIMBY-ism that comes with gentrification. (Grub Street)

It all started with the arrest of Michael Cohen. A look behind the scenes at the full year and 450 interviews from The New York Times‘ investigation into how taxi medallions ever became worth $1 million. (NY Times)

Who is the city’s supervillain pulling emergency brakes on subways and destroying our commutes? Whoever it is, they’ve been doing it for months, and possibly tears, without getting caught. (Jalopnik)

Here’s how the NYC Care Card works and what it does and does not entitle you to. (Norwood News)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is testing her political capital with an endorsement of Tiffany Cabán for Queens District Attorney, who also received endorsements from the Democratic Socialists of America, Real Justice PAC, and the Working Families Party. The primary is June 25. (NY Times)

Eight is great… unless that’s the percent of people polled who have a favorable opinion of you. Mayor de Blasio’s national favorability rating is below the president’s and the worst among anyone running for president. (Patch)

One thing that gentrification brings to a neighborhood? Rats. You may have read about the block in Prospect Heights where the rats have basically taken over, but it’s becoming a trend across the city. As more buildings have construction done, it displaces rats by destroying their burrows, forcing them to come to the surface. (NY Times)

A guide to the OMNY, which starts its slow takeover of MetroCards in 8 short days. (Curbed)

New York City is last on the list of popular destinations for retirees to live. About 15,000 seniors moved out of the city from 2016 to 2017. The top places are, unsurprisingly, Florida and Arizona. (Patch)

Video: Here’s how you can help to compost with food scrap drop-offs. (Viewing NYC)

A city council proposal to exempt yellow cabs from congestion pricing is short-sighted and foolish, according to experts. Politicians are blaming the fees for a declining number of rides and not a combination of continued congestion on the roads and app-based alternatives that make yellow cabs less desirable. (Streetsblog)

Don’t look now, but there are more vegan options in the city than ever and chefs are working to lure unsuspecting non-vegans to the dark side. Even fast food chains like Burger King and Taco Bell are getting onboard with plant-based options. (amNY)

The city’s news moves pretty fast. Blink and you’ll miss the rest of the story. What multiple people thought was a woman dressed as a character from “The Handmaid’s Tale” on the verge of committing suicide turned out to be a folded up red umbrella. (Gothamist)

Congrats to Washington Heights’ Maelyn Jarmon for winning season 16 of The Voice. (amNY)

Everything you need to know about raising chickens in NYC. (6sqft)

It’s time to take a look at President Trump’s tax returns. A bill passed the state’s legislature on Wednesday that would allow the state to hand the President’s state tax returns to Congress. The governor has voiced support in the past and is expected to sign the bill shortly. (Patch)

Google purchased another building in Chelsea to expand its footprint and keep on target to double the number of employees in its New York offices in the next ten years. (amNY)

The “LGBT in 2021” campaign is aimed at getting better LGBTQ representation into the City Council. (amNY)

All five borough presidents joined over 70 early childhood providers and Comptroller Scott Stringer in calling on the city to scrap its plans for pre-K and early childhood programs and start over saying the current plan would weaken the city’s social safety net and hinder community-based organizations to provide early education programming. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The “Summer All-Out” program will send almost 300 additional NYPD officers to high-crime areas in an attempt to reduce homicides and violent crimes. (amNY)

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