The Briefly for June 11, 2019 – The “The Pizza Wars of New York Are Getting Saucy” Edition

14th St will become a busway in July, the mayor’s nemesis is a 16-year-old teen, New Yorkers support ending the measles religious exemption, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Two Bridges towers are at the center of a legal battle, centered around the developers’ attempts to work around the city council and the land use review procedures. (Curbed)

Respect to whoever was able to cover an entire Q train with graffiti extremely quickly without being caught. (@JMartinezNYC)

Welcome to Soho, or as the Times puts it, “CBD stores and face-mask pushers are going to destroy us all.” (NY Times)

The Brooklyn Pizza War of 2019 has only just begun. L&B Spumoni Gardens is opening up a DUMBO outpost mere steps from Grimaldi’s and Juliana’s. May the best slice win. (Eater)

It appears that Robert De Niro is on the verge of building a movie studio in Astoria. (QNS)

A correction from yesterday (thanks Harry!), the apartment building planned for the former Hell’s Angels clubhouse will be 22 apartments, not 22 stories. (Curbed)

Tiffani Torres is 16, a twice-caller on “Ask the Mayor” on WNYC, an activist with Teens Take Charge, and a thorn in the mayor’s side. She’s correctly criticized the mayor for his DOA presidential run distracting him from city business and has been vocal about the systemic issues facing the city’s schools. Is it too late to elect her mayor? She sat down for an interview with the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Does Times Square need a 24-hour, multi-story “immersive” Krispy Kreme with a theater and, no I’m not kidding, a goddamn “glaze waterfall?” Of course it does. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Pride Parade took over Park Slope last weekend with heavy splashes of color, celebration, politicians, and remembrance of the Stonewall Riots half a century ago. (Brooklyn Paper)

Layleen Polanco, a 27-year old transgender woman, was found dead at Rikers Island on Friday. Polanco was a member of the House of Xtravaganza (get yourself up to speed on Ball Culture) and was arrested in April for assault and possession of a controlled substance. (Patch)

The city council scheduled a hearing to look into accusations against Grubhub (who owns Seamless), as well as Uber Eats, Doordash and the like, from restaurants accusing the company of charging fees for customer calls that never resulted in orders. (Eater)

10 of the best running spots in New York City, even if I think saying the High Line is a great place to run is like saying the Brooklyn Bridge is a great place to bike. (6sqft)

A helicopter crashed into AXA Equitable Center in Midtown, killing the pilot. Have you noticed how many helicopters are constantly flying around Manhattan? Manhattan has three public heliports and this was the second crash in less than a month, but that doesn’t seem to slow down the $800 trips to the Hamptons or the new service to take people to JFK Airport. (NY Times)

“Oh, you’re a girl, I thought you were a guy,” is an auspicious way to start a job somewhere. A chef is suing Hudson Yards Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, claiming she was fired for being a woman. (Eater)

With the Stop Violence in the Sex Trades Act, New York has a path to become the first state to decriminalize sex work, even in the face of criticism from the governor, the mayor, and Corey Johnson. (Patch)

The NYPD are arresting turnstile jumpers. The officers have wide latitude to decide who they arrest and who they ticket, so it should become obvious very quickly that people of color will be arrested at a higher rate. In 2019 people of color represent 87% of people arrested for farebeating. exact numbers aren’t known because the NYPD is refusing to comply with a court order demanding them to disclose these numbers. (Gothamist)

The conversation about rent control has gotten so muddy and opaque it’s hard to know if this article which says that mom-and-pop landlords may decide to sell their buildings if rent reform passes, is steeped in the truth or has roots in one of the many astroturfing campaigns from larger landlords and developers. (amNY)

New Yorkers overwhelmingly support the end of religious exemptions for the measles vaccine. Overwhelming is 85%, which includes more than 80% support from the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant populations polled. There’s a bill in the state’ legislature as you read this, but there is only a week left in the legislative session until summer recess. (Patch)

St. James Place in Bed Stuy is now Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” Wallace Way. (amNY)

Congrats to Gothamist on their site redesign. (Gothamist)

The perfect time for a sci-fi radio show is after midnight when everything is quiet and your imagination is ripe for exploration of its dark recesses. The “Hour of the Wolf” has aired between 1am – 3am on Thursday mornings since 1972. Helmed by Jim Freund, the show has had nearly every writer of importance on the show, the first U.S. broadcast of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and whose website was originally a collaboration with Tim Berners-Lee, the literal father of the world wide web. A living piece of broadcasting history on Atlantic Avenue. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 14th St busway will arrive on July 1, drastically changing traffic and (hopefully_ speeding up the buses. (amNY)

32 great places to eat something kind of healthy for dinner. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for April 26, 2019 – The “We Never Thought It Happen, But Here We Are” Edition

This weekend begins the L train apocalypse-lite, the Flower District is endangered, a bottle of seltzer stopped the F train cold, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

It’s been three years in the making and three months in the re-making, but this weekend the L train construction finally begins. Getting around is gonna be trying, but if you take the MTA at their word, things are still gonna be terrible if you need to get anywhere along the line. (Gothamist)

Here we go. The L Train Slowdown is finally upon us. You won’t find the L train on any lists of diversions or service changes, it will be running once every 20 minutes. The damage to the subways this weekend is relatively minimal. (Subway Changes)

One thing is certain about the L train slowdown: Like any great compromise, no one is happy. (NY Times)

Pollen is high and AccuWeather suggests if you have allergies that you should stay indoors until October. (Patch)

Mayor de Blasio revealed his budget, which increased by $300 million compared to his preliminary budget and is up $3.4 billion from last year. (Gotham Gazette)

Say farewell to Show World, which survived from 1977 until 2019, the last vestige of Midtown’s porno and prostitution history. (Curbed)

Body parts were found on the F tracks in Gravesend after NYPD officials supposedly removed the victim from the scene on Monday night. The body hasn’ been identified, but the police believe he was a Marine Park resident. (Bklyner)

The 64 people killed on NYC streets in 2019 is up by 49% from last year at the same time. The total amount of crashes are down, but there are still 560 crashes every day. (Streetsblog)

Deep breaths while you hear this. It was a bottle of seltzer, not an emergency brake, that jammed up the F train on Wednesday morning. A bottle of seltzer. (Gothamist)

10 “fun” facts about Central Park. (Untapped Cities)

The Queens Public Library’s One Court Square branch has been paying an annual rent of $1 since 1989 for the first floor of the Citigroup Building in Long Island City, but without Amazon temporarily taking up residence in the building the library is facing the boot when their lease ends on August 31. (The City)

Built that wall, but instead of a megalomaniac’s useless pet-project, it’s a 4.3-mile seawall off the coast of Staten Island to protect against climate change and prevent another Sandy. (Curbed)

Bushwick is heading for a rezoning. Five years after residents complained about the development in the neighborhood the Bushwick Neighborhood Plan calls for creating and preserving affordable homes, parks, historic buildings, and small businesses. (6sqft)

“Every time you say you’re taking out a lane, you’re slowing traffic down. I don’t care what they’re saying, it slows traffic down.” -Community Board 9’s Transportation Chairperson Carolyn Thompson. There’s no arguing with someone who concedes they don’t and won’t believe facts. (Streetsblog)

The NYC version of “Millennials are killing,” is “rising rents are killing.” Their next victim could be Manhattan’s flower district. (NY Times)

Next time you find yourself between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges in Manhattan, think about how that neighborhood was once known as the “Lung Block,” a slum with whose name indicates the high rate of tuberculosis. (6sqft)

New Yorkers love some dog breeds more than others, and a king of the canines has been crowned. (Patch)

After a staff revolt at the Museum of Natural History, a gala honoring Brazilian president and a man who “would be incapable of loving a homosexual son,” Jair Bolsonaro will take place at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square. (Gothamist)

Sweetgreen, makers of salad and a once favorite of former HQ host Scott Rogowsky, has abandoned their cashless policy amid a growing backlash against cashless businesses. (NY Times)

Broadway is car-free from Union Square to Times Square to celebrate Earth Day on Saturday from 9am to 3pm. (Gothamist)

It’s National Pretzel Day, go out on the street and get yourself a classic NYC salty bread snack at the nearest cart. If you’re too good for a street pretzel, here are some snootier options. (Patch)

Is Jersey Governor Phil Murphy playing make-believe or is MTA chairperson Pat Foye out of the loop? Murphy continues to insist that he has a “conceptual understanding” with Governor Cuomo about giving Jersey drivers a congestion pricing discount and Foye says he has “no idea” about what Murphy is talking about. (Politico)

Maybe it’s time we accept that the LinkNYC kiosks are surveillance data-sponges. Police arrested 41-year-old Juan Rodriguez for smashing up dozens of the kiosks. (Gothamist)

The mayor, now known for keeping to a deadline, moved up his estimation of when Rikers Island will close from 2027 to 2026. (Patch)

The worst person in the city has been found. Dominiqua Parrish is accused of throwing a small dog down a trash chute on the seventh floor, believing she was throwing the dog into an incinerator. The dog was saved and was treated for scrapes and bruises by the ASPCA. (QNS)

Over 40 art shows to see right now. (NY Times)

Anna Delvey/Sorokin, the Soho Grifter, was found guilty of most of the charges against her. “Fake it till you make it” said her lawyer. Looks like she might make 15 years in prison. (NY Times)

Support for driver’s licenses for all is growing amongst New York voters. (Gotham Gazette)

10 neighborhoods where rents are going down. (Street Easy)

A good (and long) weekend read: “Her ‘Prince Charming’ Turned Out to Be a Crazed Hit Man on the Run” (NY Times)

Fabián von Hauske Valtierra, the winner of Eater’s best desserts award in 2018, picks his top five desserts in the city. (Eater)

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The Briefly for April 1, 2019 – The “Congestion Pricing is Not An April Fools Joke” Edition

Participatory budgeting is here, a look at the state’s budget, the MTA starts cleaning up elevated tracks, the NYC brunch directory, and more in today’s daily NY news edition.

Quick note: There are no April Fools articles listed today.

Late night subway work this week will affect the 1, 3, 6, D, F, N, R, and G trains. (Subway Changes)

The state’s $175 billion budget passed early on Sunday, including cash bail reforms, a new mansion tax, a plastic bag ban, a property tax cap, and congestion pricing. (NY Times)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban. (Grub Street)

What’s not included in the state’s budget? Mobile sports betting. (NY Post)

Seven takeaways from the state budget. (NY Times)

It’s time to vote in participatory budgeting! There is $35 million to spend in the 32 communities in the city and you have a say in how it’s spent, and you can vote online! (nyc.gov)

Once you’ve voted, you can submit your own idea for the next cycle, like this idea for new bike racks. (PBNYC)

With the Hudson Yards open, the city has turned its eyes towards the next railroad yard to develop in Sunnyside, Queens. (Sunnyside Post)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants. (amNY)

An ode to the longtime neighborhood bar and what the loss of it means for the city. (Curbed)

Citi Bike is headed to where it’s never been before: Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Add the D train to the list of trains you want to steer clear of walking underneath. The MTA announced it will start cleaning the undersides of the D train’s elevated tracks after the 7 train started raining subway parts last month. The work is starting from the Stillwell Ave station. (Bklyner)

A history of NYC’s 13 triangle buildings. (Untapped Cities)

Summer school, but this is actually interesting. Prospect Park is looking or immigrant professors, researches, and lecturers to teach their “Open Air University,” which runs from June 11 to June 30. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Summerhill, Crown Heights’ “bullet hole” bar, has closed. (News 12)

Smorgasburg is coming back to its outdoor locations and Time Out has some suggestions about what you’re gonna want to taste. Here’s the full list of vendors/a>. (Time Out)

Former Knicks star Kristaps Porzingis has been accused of rape. Porzingis claims the encounter was consensual. (amNY)

Sink your sweet tooth into Godiva’s midtown cafe, opening on April 18. (Eater)

It’s estimated 90,000 to 230,000 birds die in the city as a result of colliding with glass buildings. A proposed bill would require 90% of glass in new and altered buildings to be treated to reduce bird fatalities. (Curbed)

Inside the battle to fight off invasive species washing down the Bronx River from Westchester. (NY Times)

6sqft is hiring!

Should you wash your hands after being on the subway? No, because except Brooklyn. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Former Assemblymember Dov Hikind is blaming a Bklyner reporter for organizing the protest against Councilmember Kalman Yeger’s comments that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Bklyner)

There’s at least one benefit of living in Staten Island: it only costs you $5.50 to cross the Verrazzano to Brooklyn. If you’re a Brooklynite (or anyone else), it’ll cost you $19. (Bklyner)

A deep dive into Industry City’s effect on Sunset Park and UPROSE, a decades-old community group whose goal was always to revitalize that area as a manufacturing hub. (The Indypendent)

If you have someone who always wants to go to brunch but never has an idea of where to go: The NYC Brunch Directory. (The Infatuation)

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