The Briefly for July 13, 2020 – The “A Summer Without Street Fairs” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Public libraries are opening, the first day without a Covid-19 death since March, the MTA looks for ideas, the NYPD steals streets, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 86˚
Clear throughout the day.

You’ll see some headlines that some areas of Queens are seeing a 58% or 68% positive rate for antibodies. While this seems like good news, having antibodies is no way to guarantee that you can’t get the infection again or even that you’ve had the infection in the past. The hope would be that neighborhoods may develop herd immunity. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The city has not built up herd immunity, which is the message from Jay Varna, the Senior Advisor for Public Health, NYC Mayor’s Office, and a vast majority of New Yorkers are still susceptible. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s ban on events means a summer without street fairs. This also includes Celebrate Brooklyn!, the Dominican Day Parade, San Gennaro, and the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

As you might expect, the Electric Zoo 2020 has been canceled. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Saturday was the first day since March 13 that no one was recorded as dying due to the coronavirus. Since March 23,283 were reported dead. (Nick Visser for HuffPost)

A look at the more difficult side of the Occupy City Hall, as the organizers have realized that their roles include caretakers for dozens of the city’s homeless that have taken to making their home in the occupation. (Alan Feuer, Juliana Kim and Byron Smith for NY Times)

Kudos to Sasha Baron Cohen, who hasn’t let the pandemic stop him from freaking out Rudy Giuliani so badly that he called the police. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

An overview of The Montefiore Family Resilience Fund, which supplies assistance for households that have lost a breadwinner or caregiver to Covid-19. The fund will assist 375 families. (Norwood News)

Officer Ernie Moran, an off-duty NYPD cop was arrested in Queens during the early hours Wednesday morning for harassing and stalking his ex-girlfriend. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Mayor de Blasio’s cuts to the NYPD included killing off the parking placard abuse unit, ensuring that he will do absolutely nothing as a mayor to end this form of low-level corruption from the NYPD. The mayor and the City Council have announced multiple initiatives to curb this type of corruption, but literally nothing has been done so far. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The NYPD has seized streets all across the city that are adjacent to station houses. Why? Don’t ask the mayor, who refuses to confront the NYPD on this theft of public space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Is the Staten Island Ferris wheel returning from the dead? The details haven’t been released, but it seems like a smaller version of the original idea might still have life. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Financial struggles brought on by the coronavirus pandemic will keep 15 Catholic schools across New York City closed for good. (Alex Mitchell and Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is turning to the public for ideas for how to keep trains and buses virus-free. Have any ideas? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the work of the Brooklyn Conviction Review Unit, whose job it is to correct hundreds of years of wrongful convictions in Brooklyn of Black and Latinx Brooklynites. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“We take responsibility for what happens in our stores—both on and off our sales floors—and we are committed to doing the work to improve how we treat our employees and customers.” Greenlight Bookstore co-owners Rebecca Fitting and Jessica Stockton-Bagnulo have made a public apology for creating an unwelcoming environment for Black customers and employees. (Brooklyn Reader)

15 New York City pools that will be reopening in August. (Jenna Fanelli for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s what a car-free, pedestrian-friendly NYC could look like., according to a plan from Architect Vishaan Chakrabarti and his firm Practice for Architecture and Urbanism. (Davin Gannon 6sqft)

Another look at the mass die-offs of fish in the Hudson river. A combination of sewage being dumped into the waters, lack of rain, and the heat are creating an extreme situation leading to the massive deaths of fish. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Wo Hop returns today for takeout orders. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Who isn’t filling out their census forms? It might be the rich. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Jose Barrera, a 50-year-old Brooklyn man was fatally run over in Borough Park while unloading his car outside his home on Saturday night. The driver was taken into custody, passed a DWI test, and was released without being charged Barrera is the 29th pedestrian to be killed by someone driving a car in 2020. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Video: Drone footage of NYC’s Black Lives Matter murals. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is suspended until July 19. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

22 public libraries in the city are reopening today. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

14 unique outdoor dining options. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 25, 2020 – The “Beaches Will Open on July 1” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 23 more miles of open streets, the best and worst of takeout and delivery, the MTA moves to stop all construction projects, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 84˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

It took the threat of the City Council forcing his hand, but Mayor de Blasio announced the city’s beaches will fully open on July 1. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Anyone traveling to New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut from states with Covid-19 outbreaks must undergo a 14-day isolation period under threat of fines that range from $2,000 to $10,000. It was announced at noon on Wednesday and went into effect at midnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The New York Marathon was canceled for 2020 and hopes to return in 2021. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

The best and worst of NYC takeout and delivery. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 hiking trails in the city to try this summer. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A spokesperson for New York City’s largest charter network resigned in protest, stating she can no longer defend Success Academy’s “racist and abusive practices” that are “detrimental to the emotional well being” of its students. (Alex Zimmerman for ChalkBeat)

New York is one of three states that is “close” to containing the coronavirus, according to the group Covid Act Now. New Jersey and Massachusetts are the other two. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The MTA is exploring the idea of using artificial intelligence to track how many subway riders are wearing face masks. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The MTA, being the MTA, is stopped all planned upgrades to subways and installing new elevators because of its financial situation. Nothing says “planning for the future” like “no updates to an already crumbling system.” Some of these repairs include bringing subway stations into compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, structural repairs to the 7 line, which was falling apart in Queens before the pandemic, and updating the signals on the A/C/E lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Say hello to the idea of the Queens Ribbon, a proposed new bridge that would like Long Island City, Roosevelt Island, and Midtown Manhattan for pedestrians and cyclists. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Major League Baseball agreed with the players union and “spring” training starts on July 1 for a 60 game season that will start on July 23 or 24. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Stonewall Inn is facing an “uncertain future” and started up a second GoFundMe to raise $100,000. Their first GoFundMe is for the staff. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Farewell to the Times Square McDonalds after 17 years. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The Times throws some cold water on the fireworks conspiracies. Phantom Fireworks, one of the largest warehouses in PA is running a buy-one-get-two-free sale. (Mihir Zaveri, Allie Conti and Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

The percentages of Black members of the NYPD have grown among captains or above and lieutenants, but the percentage of Black officers has fallen since 2008 among sergeants, detectives, and patrol officers. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

A look at NYPD’s use of helicopters for intimidation and surveillance during George Floyd protests, occasionally flying only 100 over sea level. Each helicopter is equipped with infrared cameras and a laptop that can zoom in on individual faces. The FAA recommends helicopters fly at an altitude of 1,0000 at the lowest. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

A new study from The Health Department shows the city underreported NYPD-related deaths, including a dozen deaths of unarmed people of color over five years. Between 2010 and 2015, the number was reported as 46, but research shows identified 105 deaths. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

When an NYPD SUV drove into a group of protesters, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says they didn’t violate policy and they came out with “no injuries to anyone.” (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

“Last Halloween, my wife and then-6-year-old daughter were making their way home after trick-or-treating in Brooklyn. Suddenly, an unmarked NYPD car with sirens wailing began speeding against traffic up a one-way street, our neighborhood’s main thoroughfare. The officer seemed to be going after a few teenage boys.

Then, in an instant, the car hit one of the kids.”
-Eric Umansky for ProPublica, My Family Saw a Police Car Hit a Kid on Halloween. Then I Learned How NYPD Impunity Works.

Starting Tuesday night, activists have occupied City Hall Park with a plan to stay through the end of the month, calling for a reduction in the NYPD’s budget by $1 billion. (Sydney Pereira and Scott Heins for Gothamist)

The city will paint a Black Lives Matter mural on the street in front of Trump Tower. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Photos: The history of the Dyke March. (Donna Aceto for Gay City News)

New York City does not plan to offer in-person classes this summer for students with disabilities. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Mayor de Blasio announced 23 miles of new open streets, including nine miles of temporarily protected bike lanes. It brings the total milage to 67, short of his promise to open 100 miles by the end of this month. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor announced the city might have to lay off or furlough 22,000 municipal workers this fall to help close the city’s budget gap. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

After another mess of an election day in NYC, there is another round of calls to reform how we vote to make elections more inclusive and fair. (Toss Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re planning on doing outdoor dining, check ahead to see if you’ll need reservations. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

10 excellent places for takeout in Queens. (Joe DeStefano for Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Ryan for sending in today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 13, 2020 – The “Social Distance Chicken is the Mascot We Need Right Now” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: When happens when “work from home” becomes “work,” the best Cuban sandwiches, how to do your brows at home, opening up Queens’ golf courses, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 59˚
Clear throughout the day.

Broadway will be closed through Labor Day, at least. It’s tough news but is necessary for ticket holders, who have had the fate of their summer ticket purchases up in the air for some time. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The “new normal” that everyone is talking about has one universal theme: a lot of new rules to follow. Greenmarkets could provide a glimpse into our future, as they’ve remained open throughout the pandemic. (Robin Raisfeld for Grub Street)

Remember haircuts? What’s a haircut gonna look like once salons and barbershops reopen? Here’s a peek into what we may be in for. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Good morning, and only good morning, to Greenpoint bar Magazine’s mascot, the Social Distance Chicken. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Between March 16 and May 10, the NYPD made 125 arrests that were related to the coronavirus, and 166 people, 93% of those arrested were people of color. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams doesn’t blame the NYPD for the racial discrepancy in arrests and summons, but Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio. Williams led a protest march in Manhattan on Monday, which the NYPD allowed to complete, despite first amendment rallies being momentarily banned. Williams’s point isn’t that the rules that are established are being arbitrarily enforced, but that the rules represent an undue burden on people of color? It’s such a ponderous argument to make that I assume I haven’t read the article right. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

In a potentially unholy pairing, Uber is looking at eating GrubHub. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

City Council has modified a proposed emergency bill capping third-party food delivery fees for restaurants — raising the maximum fee from 10 percent to 20 percent, depending on how the restaurant uses the services, with a $1,000 fine per restaurant per day for non-compliance. Currently, delivery app companies charge upwards of 30%. (Erika Adams for Eater)

“If our employees are in a role and situation that enables them to work from home and they want to continue to do so forever, we will make that happen.” Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey laid out a future where working in the company’s Midtown South offices won’t be required for NYC employees. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Is putting thousands of people inside of one building a thing of the past? Facebook and Google have extended work-from-home through the end of the year. Chase is re-evaluating whether to send its 180,000 employees back to its NYC offices. If more companies follow where Twitter is going, get ready for Manhattan, with the country’s largest business district, to face a reckoning it’s never experienced before. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Impossibly adding a pop-up office to an 400-square-foot apartment, a miraculous feat by small-space connoisseur Rae Lambert. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Apartment Porn: For $13.5 million in Brooklyn Heights, you get two terraces, a garden, arched entrances, five beds, and seven baths. That’s enough room to display all your Beanie Babies and Trolls dolls. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

The best Cuban sandwiches available for takeout and delivery. (Florence Fabricant for NY Times)

A horrifying dive into how the Department of Education continually downplayed the threat of Covid-19 on the city’s children, including allowing large gatherings, withholding information, improperly cleaning, not contacting the Health Department if a teacher had tested positive and more. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Pedestrianize Queens’ gold courses is the out-of-the-box thinking that we need right now. Kudos to City Council Member Constantinides for proposing the idea. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Video: What’s the story with the 18-mile wire circling most of Manhattan? An investigation into Manhattan’s eruv. (Half as Interesting)

Mayor de Blasio signed the Dangerous Vehicle Abatement Program into law in February but has allocated zero dollars towards it, effectively killing the program. Since de Blasio signed the bill, over 700 drivers have received more than 15 speeding tickets each. The program would mandate training for drivers with fifteen or more speeding tickets or five or more red light tickets in a year. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Videos: Highlights of the Rise Up New York! COVID-19 benefit. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Video: Take a look back 110 years into what Coney Island was like in 1910 with this colorized video from the original Luna Park at its peak. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York City’s jail population has been reduced by 28% since March, only 8% have been rearrested, although an unnamed police official told Gothamist that 8% is a high number. There were several major crimes, but no murders. It’s hard to determine the real impact because the releases happened due to a change in the bail law and the coronavirus outbreak. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Video: Are ice cream trucks essential? The co-founder of Funtime Frostee makes his case. (Nilo Tabrizy, Ainara Tiefenthäler, and Noah Throop for NY Times)

Are your brows looking more like two caterpillars than you want them to? Tips form city’s salons on shaping and tweezing your own eyebrows. Desperate times call for desperate measures. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Once restaurants reopen, Mayor de Blasio said the city is open to the idea of allowing restaurants to use street space for seating to allow for more space for patrons. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York City has hired over 500 contact tracing staff and will be providing hotel rooms and support for the tracers as needed so they can remain as isolated as possible while completing their task. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Are you tired of the same options for takeout and delivery from the same places? A look at NYC restaurants with new takeout and delivery options. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Emma for today’s featured flower photo from Chelsea!