The Briefly for November 13, 2018 – The “The Final ‘Parts Unknown’ Episode” Edition

Pedestrian plazas bring an old problem to light, the subway car found in the Mojave Desert, Amazon’s Long Island City announcement is coming soon, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Amazon’s choice of Long Island City has been the worst kept secret in some time. The latest rumor is that the announcement will make it official today. Not everyone is thrilled about Amazon’s potential Long Island City headquarters. State Senator Michael Gianaris and City Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, who both represent Long Island City, have worry about the local infrastructure needed to support 25,000 additional workers and the corporate welfare that would be necessary to make this deal happen. (The Real Deal, amNY)

Every spot on Anthony Bourdain’s final “Parts Unknown” in the Lower East Side. (Thrillist)

The Alamo Drafthouse ain’t nothing ta F’ wit. The Wu-Tang Clan’s RZA is working with the Alamo Drafthouse on The Flying Guillotine, a kung-fu themed bar/museum/video store in Shaolin itself, Staten Island. (SILive.com)

“We don’t need him” Simcha Felder, the black sheep of NY’s Democrats, has some real work to do to get back in the good graces of his party. (NY Post)

Vaccine deniers in the Orthodox Jewish community are to blame for Brooklyn’s measles outbreak. (Vox)

Try not to freak out, but the Nutella Cafe is open in Union Square. (Time Out)

Happy belated birthday to the man who received a key to Brooklyn, Tracy Morgan. (NY1)

The NYPD is accused of downplaying a racist attack at the Church Ave Q station after a woman was called a “black bitch” by white man and was then punched and stabbed. (Gothamist)

White supremacist graffiti was found in Williamsburg’s Transmitter Park at the end of Kent St. (Greenpointers)

The story of the subway car on display on the corner of W 42nd and 6th Ave has a wild story from NYC to the Mojave Desert and back. (Gothamist)

The star atop the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is 900 pounds, has 3 million Swarovski crystals, and was designed by Daniel Libsekind. (NY Times)

Andy Warhol (via the Whitney) took over the 14th St station at 8th Ave. It’s not a David Bowie level takeover, but it’s a nice departure from the usual ads. (Gothamist)

The city’s pedestrian plazas and public spaces have become a microcosm of the city’s problems with homelessness and opioid abuse. (NY Times)

In honor of Stan Lee, the most detailed map of Marvel’s New York City. (Inverse)

This is your year to take part of the Coney Island Polar Bear plunge on January 1. Registration is now open. (Bklyner)

The Old New York diorama, made in 1939, at the Museum of Natural History was updated with a new interpretation of the events and highlights the misinterpretations of the Lenape people. (Viewing NYC)

17 thrifty food and drink picks, from oversized cookies to karaoke, from air hockey to beer tours. (amNY)

Women working at LaGuardia earn up to $50,000 less then their male counterparts. (NY Post)

A group in Queens is working to landmark a newly rediscovered burial ground for freed slaves that dates back to the early 1800s. The site was in the process of being developed when workers discovered an iron casket. (Jackson Heights Post)

A bill headed to the City Council will eliminate the position of Public Advocate. There have been four Public Advocates since the office was created in 1993: Mark J. Green (first proposed 311), Betsy Gotbaum, current Mayor Bill de Blasio, and future Attorney General Letitia James. (amNY)

The pink tax extends to transit. Women in NYC spend $26 to $50 more on transit each month due to safety concerns. (amNY)

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The Briefly for October 11, 2018 – Does the Penn Station Problem Have a Solution?

The MTA is ready to give up on new ideas, an alpaca roamed around Brooklyn, the Papaya King expands his kingdom, NYCHA is out of money, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

“This is really our last, best shot at getting this right.” Will this be the time for Penn Station’s renaissance or will it continue to be the crowded hellhole that we all know and loathe?

If you don’t vote, you are doubling the value of someone else’s vote. (kottke.org) Did you know you can register to vote at a LinkNYC kiosk? (The Brooklyn Reader) Voter registration closes on Friday for the November 6 election.

Remember Pastagram, the restaurant specifically made to look good in photos? Turns out the food isn’t terribly photogenic. (NY Post)

He’s the Papaya King, we just live in his kingdom. (Eater)

The Morgan is celebrating 200 years of Frankenstein (and his monster) with “It’s Alive! Frankenstein at 200,” with parts of the original manuscript, movie memorabilia, the original Fuseli painting that inspired the story and more. (amNY)

The NYPD arrested Nigel Kennedy, a self-proclaimed spiritual leader, on several charges of rape and sexual misconduct after who women accused him of drugging then during a “religious ceremony.” (BKLYNER)

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle’s original copper eagle found a new home in the Brooklyn Public Library. The library is having a naming contest for the eagle. Is Eagle McEagleface an option? (amNY)

Watching a loose alpaca in Borough Park is precisely what you need right now. (@jacobkornbluh)

The resources are not there to do the job” -Stanley Brezenoff, interim chairman of the NYCHA. Repairs are desperately needed and the funding isn’t available, leaving tens of thousands of New Yorkers in deteriorating conditions. (NY Post)

New York has a rich history of throwing on headphones and ignoring the world. (Gothamist)

18 iconic locations in 18 iconic films. (StreetEasy)

15 standout fast-casual restaurants in Midtown for your lunchtime chow downs. (Eater)

The MTA is opening a “transit tech lab,” because it seems that they’re ready to admit that they can’t our transit woes themselves. (6sqft)

Cellino & Barnes are having a “record year” despite their public feud and breakup. (NY Post)

“Candy Nation,” a series of 20 9-foot tall candy sculptures by French sculptor Laurence Jenkell, has landed in the Garment District as part of the 15th Annual Arts Festival. (Untapped Cities)

The DOT announced plans to redesign Northern Blvd after six traffic deaths in 2017 and four so far in 2018. (Curbed)

The MTA promises that during the L train shutdown, they will not shut down the subways below 14th St on the weekends. Let’s see if they stick to that. (Gothamist)

The restoration of the Truman Capote House in Brooklyn Heights is complete. (Brownstoner)

The 10 best places to see foliage in Central Park. (Untapped Cities)


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The Briefly for October 9, 2018 – Columbus Day Parade was a Bust, the Best Trick-or-Treating, the Tattoo Ban, and More

The history of NYC’s tatoo ban, the mayor blames the gym for him being a dick, Tony Avella is a sore loser, the GOP is abandoning Molinaro, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

You have until October 12 to register for the November 6 election. Check your voter registration status before the deadline to make sure you’re registered.

The best neighborhoods in the city for Halloween trick-or-treating. (Curbed)

The history of NYC’s 36-year ban on tattoos. (Untapped Cities)

Amid the embarrassing mess that is New York City public school bus program, former Deputy Schools Chancellor Elizabeth Rose resigned Friday from her post as “senior transportation contracts adviser.” She had been demoted twice this year and reports conflict if she quit or was fired. (Daily News)

Anthony Weiner is on track to be released early from federal prison for good conduct in May 2019, rather than August. (NY Post)

Where to find the most famous residents of New York City, in their permanent places of rest. (Curbed)

Greenacre Park, which features a 25-foot waterfall on E 51st between 2nd and 3rd, in Midtown was added to the National Registry of Historic Places. (6sqft)

The mayor decided that it’s the gym’s fault and not his own that he dismissed a homeless advocate and not his own. “There is an explicit rule: You are not allowed to film in the place.” (NY Post)

City Taxi & Limousine Commissioner Meera Joshi was chased away from a vigil held in honor of late Uber driver Fausto Luna on Sunday. (amNY)

NYPD officer Simone Teagle is suing the city and the mayor for $5 million for allegedly being discriminated against for being a nursing mother. (NY Post)

Joel Herskovitz, a Hasidic man, was arrested for disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, and obstructing governmental administration in Borough Park after intentionally blocking a cop car in the middle fo the street and now members of the community are calling for the commanding officer to be removed, which is highly unlikely. Video of the incident shows the group chanting “Nazi” at the arresting officers. (Gothamist)

After losing the Democratic primary to John Liu, sore loser and current Queens State Senator Tony Avella will run on a third-party ticket. (NY Post)

GOP gubernatorial hopeful Marcus J. Molinaro is down to his last $210k while the state’s Republican Party has abandoned him and is focusing their efforts, and funding, on the State Senate. (NY Times)

“If I had to list it, it’d be the worst parade I’ve ever attended.” The Columbus Day Parade wasn’t a hit this year. (NY Post)


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