The Briefly for November 21, 2019 – The “Raccoons Take Control, De Blasio’s MTA Influence Weakens” Edition

The best falafel, the city pays out $1 billion in lawsuits annually, Corey Johnson continues the tradition of playing politics with the budget, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Trash pandas rule the city’s parks at night, but now they are turning their little bandit-faced gaze towards becoming the kinds of the subterranean. Raccoon-related subway delays are up this year, way up. (Gothamist)

Let’s call it The Great Bell Blvd Oil Heist. The NYPD arrested Nigeme Rowe for stealing used oil from restaurants that put out the oil for recycling companies to be turned into biodiesel. (QNS)

The Daily News’ owners sold 25% of the company to the Tribune Company, the “destroyer of newspapers.” Sound promising. (Patch)

The city has paid $84.5 million annually to the victims of traffic violence caused by city employees in the Departments of Fire, Sanitation, Police, Transportation, and Parks. Add in all claims against the city? The number balloons to $1 billion. (Streetsblog)

The candy vendor arrested in a Harlem subway station last week plans to sue the city for $5 million for excessive force used by the four police officers who arrested him. (amNewYork)

The Queens DA will release its internal “credibility database” of cops who are suspected of lying in court. (Gothamist)

Are there enough places to buy coffee in NYC? Bandit is a new company that plans to open a coffee stand where you can buy a cup via their app with their eventual goal to be within a five minute walk from anyone who wants coffee. (Eater)

Broadway is Broadway, but Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway and smaller theaters far beyond still has a strong economical presence. Non-Broadway theater generates $584 million annually and employs 3,000 people according to a new study form the mayor’s office. (NY Times)

Five holiday decoration tips for small spaces, including the very sad “put branches in the shape of a tree on your wall.” (StreetEasy)

Lyft and the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) announced the formation of a new Equity Advisory Board for Citi Bike to discuss and evaluate Citi Bike’s equity strategy to better serve New York. (Curbed)

This look back at the history of 57th St starts with the quintessential Manhattan question: “Does anyone actually want to go to Midtown?” (Gothamist)

13 Brooklyn condos with the best waterfront views. (6sqft)

The case for ending free parking in NYC is getting stronger. (NY Times)

Here are the things that New Yorkers are looking for when they search for a new home. Here’s a hint: low crime and good light. (Localize Labs)

Add another name to the great fried chicken fight of 2019. From Philly, the latest contestant is Starliner in Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Evictions are down in Manhattan, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and Queens, but not in the Bronx according to a new report issued by NYU’s Furman Center. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The Times is searching for stories about your neighborhood bodega. (NY Times)

Is your regular hookup becoming “a thing?” Here’s where to go when you’re not sure that your friend with benefits might want to have the “what ARE we?” talk. (The Infatuation)

Mayor de Blasio’s influence over the MTA is diminishing as one of his appointees, Veronica Vanterpool, is resigning from the MTA’s board. Vanterpool was also the youngest board member at 44 and its only woman of color. (Politico)

The MTA’s automated bus-mounted camera ticketing system is coming to the 14th St busway and will be online on December 2 and for the first sixty days, drivers will only receive a warning. (Gothamist)

Ten city zip codes are among the United States’ most expensive when it comes to home prices at numbers 5 and 8, respectively. Tribeca and Hudson Square broke through to the top ten. (Patch)

It seems that as long as you say you “didn’t realize” you hit and killed someone with your car, the NYPD will absolve you of wrongdoing. (Streetsblog)

A second New Yorker has died due to a vaping-related illness. (Patch)

More than two dozen homes in Dyker Heights have begun their annual Christmas light transformation. (Brooklyn Paper)

In September of 2018, the Department of Sanitation begun parking garbage trucks overnight on 10th between 1st and 2nd, which quite honestly sucks for the people who live on that block. It took 14 months, but State Senator Brad Hoylman and State Assemblymember Deborah J. Glick have introduced a bill that will prevent the DSNY from parking on residential streets. As a result, the DSNY has decided to move its trucks to Pier 42 for the next three months. (EV Grieve)

Starting next year, some buildings in the city will be required to display a letter grade, similar to restaurants, showing how energy efficient they are. (NY Times)

Is Corey Johnson using the City Council’s budget to reward his allies and make political deals? Yes. Has this been common practice in the City Council for long before Corey Johnson because the speaker? Also yes. (Politico)

NYC needs more weird, like Mother Pigeon, the bird woman artist and animal rights advocate who makes acrylic pigeon sculptures and sets them up in Union Square. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a celebration of Fet Gede in Downtown Brooklyn, the Haitian voodoo Festival of the Dead. (NY Times)

The best falafel in NYC. (Grub Street)

Thank you to MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 7, 2019 – The “Lubing Up the Cube in Astor Place” Edition

A list of lying NYPD officers, low voter turnout in this year’s elections, no one wants to live in Turtle Bay, the best coffee shop in the US, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The sweet spot for rent in the city might be $2,700 and four other things you need to know about the city’s real estate market. (StreetEasy)

The life, death, and rebirth of the Orchard Street pedestrian mall, the only street in the city that closes on Sundays to become a pedestrian mall. (Bowery Boogie)

A look at how gentrification has changed Fort Greene. (NY Times)

How does the cube in Astor Place stay able to spin? It gets lubed. (EV Grieve)

Commercial rent control may be how the city fights the retail vacancy crisis. (Gothamist)

Death certificates for overdoses in New York state must state a type of opioid thanks to a bill signed into law by Governor Cuomo on Tuesday. (amNewYork)

“The Seated IV” from Wangechi Mutu, which sits outside the Met as part of the facade, will be on display until June, instead of coming to an end in January. (NY Times)

Gothamist/WNYC has been fighting to get the secret list that each of the five borough District Attorneys maintains of cops who have been accused of dishonesty. Thanks to a successful Freedom of Information request, a three-page list of liar cops from the Brooklyn DA’s office was released on Wednesday. (Gothamist)

Who wants to live in Turtle Bay or Midtown? That question might be harder to answer than you think. Of the entire city, those are the two neighborhoods with the most real estate price drops in October. (amNewYork)

The best restaurants in Inwood. (The Infatuation)

Not much of the city voted on Tuesday. Only 13.9% of registered voters actually voted. While early voting was supposed to make voting easier, the locations were limited to 33 across the entire city. The mayor is hoping to increase that number to 100 for the 2020 election. (amNewYork)

James O’Neill is leaving his commissionership with the NYPD for a security job at Visa. (Patch)

The best coffee shop in the USA is Sey Coffee on Grattan Street in Bushwick, according to Food & Wine magazine. (Patch)

The definitive guide to the Hudson Yards development boom. (Curbed)

A $50 million triplex penthouse on Central Park West, once belonging to Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, can be yours if you’ve got $50 million lying around. (StreetEasy)

The president will return to the city that hates him to kick off Monday’s Veteran’s Day parade in Manhattan. This just went from parade to shit show. (amNewYork)

Where to go for affogato, the city’s newest must-try dessert, vanilla gelato with espresso poured over it. (Eater)

The Long Island City Clock Tower is going to go through a restoration that will start and end next year. (LIC Post)

120,000 pounds of clothes were collected for donation at the start of the NYC Marathon, with those clothes going to Goodwill. Since 2012 a million pounds have been collected and donated. (amNewYork)

Once the L train’s signal updates are complete, the M train is the next line to be upgraded and inconvenienced by late-night service disruptions while they’re being installed. (amNewYork)

Billy Eichner remains the only person I want one of the hundreds that call Met Life Stadium home. (Gothamist)

The best restaurants in Sunnyside and Woodside. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for November 6, 2019 – The “Where Have All The Duane Reades Gone” Edition

Election results, the ultimate guide to eating at Wegmans, ICE continues to make courthouse arrests, the best bear, never enough food halls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

In a new effort by the MTA and law enforcement to crack down on fare evasion, New York City reportedly opened a $500 million decoy subway station this week to catch turnstile jumpers. (The Onion)

Something is wrong when even Duane Reade is reducing its footprint in the city. (Gothamist)

The 2019 New York City 40 Under 40 Rising Stars. (City and State)

Only 1.14% of the registered voters in the city turned out to vote early this election. Come on, people! Let’s pick it up next time around. (amNewYork)

Jumaane Williams was re-elected as the city’s public advocate with 74.13% of the vote. (Patch)

All five ballot referendums were emphatically answered by voters as “YES!” Ranked-choice voting was approved by 72.94%. Civilian Complaint Review Board reform was approved by 77.05%. Ethics and governance approved with 77.05%. Establishing a rainy-day find was approved by 70.51%. and ULURP changes were approved by 75.83%. (amNewYork)

Melinda Katz is Queens’ new District Attorney. (QNS.com)

Central Park will be adding signage to acknowledge that in 1857 the city kicked the mostly African American inhabitants of Seneca Village off their land in order to create the park. (Curbed)

David’s Briskey House in Bed-Stuy is a legendary Jewish deli run by a Yemeni, proving that food belongs to no one. (Atlas Obscura)

The NYC filming locations for Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman. (Untapped New York)

Alanis Morisette will be celebrating the opening of the ‘Jagged Little Pill’ Broadway musical with an acoustic performance of the album at the Apollo Theater. (Brooklyn Vegan)

There will be a wall in the Gowanus Canal, and National Grid is going to pay for it. It’s true, as a part of the Superfund cleanup, National Grid will build a wall to prevent liquid tar from re-contaminating the canal on the old Fulton Manufactured Gas Plant. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: A feature on Macon Hardware in Bed-Stuy, and Clara Hayes, the 92-year-old unofficial mayor of the block and proprietor, who runs the place. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re purchasing health insurance from the marketplace, you’ve got until December 15 to enroll for coverage for January 1. (amNewYork)

What to do in the Bronx that’s not baseball, the zoo or the Botanical Garden. (6sqft)

Don’t say Alec Baldwin punched you if Alec Baldwin didn’t actually punch you. (Gothamist)

Your reward for voting is this series of adorable videos of Sonya the brown bear acting like a little puppy when seeing her former caretaker. (Gothamist)

Are there enough food halls in Midtown? Never! Here come two more. (6sqft)

A list of demands for Dermot Shea, the city’s new police commissioner. (Streetsblog)

When Mayor de Blasio announced Dermot Shea was to be the city’s next police commissioner, he passed over Benjamin Tucker, the second-highest-ranking overall and the top black police official. This is the third time that the mayor passed over Tucker for the position, instead, he picked Benjamin Bratton, James O’Neill, and now Dermot Shea. (NY Times)

If crime declines, should the number of cops follow it? (Gothamist)

ICE has continued to arrest immigrants at courthouses in New York. The Immigrant Defense Project has counted 112 incidents and sightings and that agents are ignoring the state’s rule that prevents federal agents from making arrests in courthouses without a warrant. (amNewYork)

The Dreamland Roller Disco has landed in a new Brooklyn location. The latest incarnation is at City Point in Downtown Brooklyn. (Time Out)

The ultimate guide to eating at Wegmans. (Gothamist)