The Briefly for August 6, 2019 – The “Absolutely Unbelievable Story of A French Bulldog” Edition

The Union Square Tech Hub broke ground, the most rat-infested neighborhoods, a vigil turns into a mass shooting, a beaver in the Hudson, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Union Square Tech Hub, formerly the PC Richard & Son near Union Square, broke ground on Monday to cheers for new jobs and jeers that Union Square may soon resemble midtown. (amNY)

25,000 bees were removed from the Staten Island Ferry terminal in St. George. The NYPD’s beekeeping unit relocated the hive. If you come across thousands of bees, don’t spray them with anything and don’t call 311, call 911. (NY Times)

Meet Winston, a French bulldog who accidentally jumped off a six-story window, smashed through the sunroof of a car below and LIVED! Winston is staying at the vet for observation but has no broken bones. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio says Bernie Sanders would have won the 2016 election, does this embracing of Bernie mean the mayor is ready to stop spending his weekends in Iowa? (Politico)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard hit a milestone 10,000 jobs for the first time in half a century. While it may never see it’s World War II peak of 70,000 jobs, they are expecting to see 20,000 by 2021. (amNY)

Driverless cars have arrived in NYC, but they’re only inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard as shuttles, operating in a one-mile loop to and from the ferry terminal for free. (NY Times)

Which neighborhoods are the coolest in the city? Brooklyn Heights, Prospect Heights, and the Upper West Side. Strictly speaking, in those neighborhoods, tree cover provides the most shade and absorbs the most heat, making them the “coolest.” (Curbed)

The best Greek restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

De Blasio steps in it again. The city purchased a cluster of buildings in April for $173 million, which appraisals showed a value between $50 million and $143 million. De Blasio owns two houses in the city and the mortgages on those homes come from the brother of one of the people who sold the city the overpriced buildings. Par for the course for our failing presidential candidate of a mayor. (Curbed)

The Dogspot “pet harbors” aka “dog jails” pilot program in Brooklyn passed City Council. These are the little locking windowed air-conditioned jail cells for dogs to sit in while you go into a store. It’s a step up from leaving your dog tied up and unattended like your best furry friend is a bike. (Bushwick Daily)

Meeting, James Turrell’s skyspace installation at MoMA PS1 is open after having its unobstructed view of the sky marred by construction at the buildings where 5Pointz was in Long Island City. (Gothamist)

For those of the spooky persuasion, Halloween is less than 100 days away. For those inside the haunted house industry, it’s already time to get to work. Take a look inside the construction of the Bane Haunted House in Chelsea. (amNY)

Eight crypts and catacombs in the city, some spooky, some scary, some tourist attractions. (Untapped Cities)

What do Prospect Heights and Central Harlem South have in common? They’re the two neighborhoods with the most rats per square mile in the city. (Patch)

How cold do you want your ice cream? How about “liquid nitrogen cold?” Four Winters, a new ice cream shop in Queens, is using liquid nitrogen to create “instant ice cream.” (NY Times)

It’s a midtown sidewalk showdown between a business improvement district and food cart owners. Food cart owners are accusing midtown developers are accusing the BID of intentionally putting flower planters and bike racks where their carts usually stand in an attempt to get rid of them. (amNY)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite where over one million New Yorkers have been buried since the Civil War, operated by the Department of Corrections and inmates are paid $1 per hour to bury bodies, is finally getting a post-Hurricane Sandy restoration. Erosion has caused the shoreline to disappear and as a result, human remains were exposed. (Curbed)

Add this to your list of travel nightmare scenarios. A woman was locked underneath a Peter Pan coach bus with the luggage on a bus bound for Boston. The police arrested the Peter Pan employee that allegedly locked her in. (amNY)

Part of the deal that allowed the Atlantic Yards to be developed was that 2,250 affordable apartments would be built by 2025. At the current rate of construction, developer Greenland Forest City Partners looks like it’ll be missing that deadline. (The City)

A beaver was spotted in the Hudson River, hanging out and doing beaver things. It’s been a while since the city’s seen wild beavers, but the beaver is the official state animal and the city was pretty much founded on the fur trade, but this little guy is safe from that. (Gothamist)

The lawsuit preventing 14th St from becoming a busway has already cost commuters an additional year’s worth of delays. (amNY)

A vigil in Crown Heights became a public mass shooting when four of the people holding the vigil were shot early Monday morning. All the victims are in stable condition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Agrilus 9895 is a new species of beetle discovered in Green-Wood Cemetery and is a relative of a species of beetle in Europe but unique to Brooklyn. (Atlas Obscura)

Where do food industry pros go when their shifts are over? A list of late-night locations. (amNY)

The Briefly for July 2, 2019 – The “One of the Worst Run Big Cities in America!” Edition

The CBD ban is kind-of in effect, the 14th St busway lawsuit gets pushback, the best lunch spots in Midtown East, the Seamless controversy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Start putting your July 4th travel plans together, even if you’re not planning on leaving the city, because subways, streets, buses, and ferries will all be affected by holiday changes. (Curbed)

Congrats to presidential candidate and sometimes-in-NYC mayor Bill de Blasio. New York City is one of the worst run big cities in America! (Patch)

After the Shalimar Diner closed in November, a Facebook group called “Save the Shalimar Diner” wanted to… you know, save the Shalimar Diner. Cue 1986 Met Lenny Dykstra, who is (kind of) saving it by moving the whole thing to Long Island. (Untapped Cities)

Construction debris fell from the 12th story of a nearby apartment building still being finished through the roof of Mission Delores, the popular Park Slope bar, on Sunday, seriously injuring a woman who was in the bar. Mission Delores is closed until further notice and the woman who was struck is breathing with the assistance of a tube at Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. (Eater)

8 new outdoor art installations for July. (Untapped Cities)

Dante de Blasio wrote an op-ed in today’s USA Today about “the talk” his father had with him about dealing with the police that was mentioned in last week’s presidential primary debate. The head of the Police Benevolent Associaton called the mayor’s remarks “shameful.” (USA Today)

Eater wanted to know if L&B Spumoni Garden is still good. Turns out it is! (Eater)

The city is nearly doubling its monetary support for the LGBT community with funding for Trans Equity Programs, LGBT community services, and LGBT inclusive curriculums in public schools. (6sqft)

Here’s what you need to know about the Grub Hub/Seamless website buying controversy that erupted last week. Grub Hub has been finding new and creative ways to rip off local restaurants, including registering fake websites in their names and tricking customers. (Grub Street)

Playing ping-pong on the subway. Fun idea or public nuisance? (Gothamist)

The president doesn’t seem to know Letitia James’s name, but he certainly knows he thinks she’s being used by Governor Cuomo against him. (Patch)

The count of people who’ve died in car crashes while riding bicycles is up to 15 in 2019. 29-year-old Devra Freelander was hit and killed by a 70-year-old cement truck driver in Bushwick. (Streetsblog)

The number of dead bicyclists on city streets was 10 for all of 2018, the mayor says Vision Zero, which strives to “use every tool at its disposal to improve the safety of our streets,” will still be viewed as a success this year. (Gothamist)

The opposition to the 14th Street busway has some opposition of its own. An advocacy group supporting the busway slammed the lawsuit that blocked the busway from taking effect on July 1 as classist, citing the average rider of the M14 has an income of $28,455/year and are people of color. (amNY)

Reaching-Out in Bensonhurst is a food pantry that has provided food and social service referrals to people in need for 30 years but due to a shortage of funds has had to turn away hungry families. The shortage is due to stagnant funding. They currently serve 9,800 families and are always open to donations. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you have $13 million, you can own something almost no one in NYC has: your own set of private islands. (NY Times)

The city’s ban on CBD was promised at the beginning of the year for July 1. Now that it’s July, the Department of Health claims that it is cracking down, but they won’t issues fines until October 1. (amNY)

If you’re looking for the city’s biggest asshole, you wouldn’t be wrong to start looking at whoever decided to create this $250 hot dog. (Gothamist)

What does Midtown need? How about an 800-foot tall tower right on top of Macy’s? (NY Times)

The mayor will honor the late Det. Luis Alvarez, who recently died at 53 due to 9/11-related cancer, with a key to the city. (amNY)

A former high school student was awarded nearly $60 million in damages on Monday after a Manhattan jury found the city’s Department of Education and his former teacher liable for an accident that left much of his body scarred from third-degree burns. (NY Times)

A non-NIMBY argument against City Councilmember Brad Lander’s “YIMBY Junk.” (Red Hook Star-Revue)

The days of speeding without consequence in the city is coming to an end. The city is installing 2,000 speed cameras within a quarter mile of schools, which are practically everywhere. Anyone going 10 mph over the posted speed limit will get a $50 ticket. Critics say that turning the entire city into a speed trap won’t save lives, but anyone who gets a $50 ticket in the mail will start driving differently. (NY Times)

Where to get lunch in Midtown East. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 24, 2019 – The “In Defense of a New York City Summer” Edition

What was on and what was off the state’s legislative agenda, the summer forecast, the Mermaid Parade, pity the real estate investors, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions are over, just in time for late-night weekday disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Democrats, you have the chance to vote for your next District Attorney primary on Tuesday. Last minute dropouts, endorsements, and ads are setting the candidates apart from each other. (Politico)

Candidate Tiffany Cabán is following the AOC playbook to a possible Queens DA election victory. It helps she’s also received AOC’s endorsement. (NY Times)

In 2017, lead was found in the water fountains in multiple city schools. In a small investigation in four schools, WNYC found high levels of lead-paint contamination in the city’s schools. (Gothamist)

When was your last true “what the hell” subway moment? How about this one caught on video with an argument between a man holding a gun and another holding a bat? (@SubwayCreatures)

The summer’s long-range weather predictions have been made for the city, and it’s gonna be a hot year. (Patch)

In defense of summer in the city. (Gothamist)

There is a small ring of people stealing the earnings from Lyft and Uber drivers across the city using the drivers’ own phones to take the money. (Gothamist)

The ten oldest theaters in Times Square. (Untapped Cities)

After about 200 shows, Broadway’s ‘Be More Chill’ is set to close on August 11. (amNY)

Stargazing isn’t impossible in the city you just have to know where to look. (Atlas Obscura)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health includes a Little Italy favorite, a USPS cafeteria (which is also this week’s winner for most violations), and multiple others. (Patch)

If you’ve got the bug and are looking to run for elected office in the city, here’s how it just got a little easier. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Cardi B was indicted from a fight in a strip club was last year. She rejected a plea deal that would have required no jail time and was paired with reduced charges in April. (amNY)

Your guide to summer in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s a look at 12 things the Democrat-dominated state’s legislature accomplished this year. (NY Times)

The list of accomplishments in the state legislature looks impressive, but here’s what didn’t make the agenda. (Gothamist)

One thing that was left off the legislative agenda was the mayor’s attempts to change the specialized high school entrance exams. Consider the effort dead, with multiple Democrats voting against it in committee and it never seeing a floor vote. (NY Times)

What happened to the automatic voter registration bill? A “typo” derailed the effort and it will have to be taken up in the next legislative session. (Gothamist)

Maybe electric bikes shouldn’t be allowed in bike lanes? Wait, what?This makes sense if you’re the mayor, the rest of us will be left to scratch our heads. (Patch)

A body was found floating off Pier 36 on the Lower East Side. The body wasn’t identified outside of being a male Asian in his 30s. (The Villager)

The 14th St Busway, scheduled to take hold on July 1, was hit with a lawsuit by residents of Chelsea and the West Village. The lawsuit says the city hasn’t properly studied how banning cars will impact the surrounding neighborhoods. (Curbed)

Here are the details about what’s changing about marijuana in New York after the state’s decriminalization bill. (amNY)

The MTA is reorganizing this summer, but since the governor didn’t put one of the mayor’s board recommendations to the state senate, the city will have one less representative during the discussions. It’s possible that it was a simple mistake, but it’s also possible that this is another part of the rich tapestry that is the feud between Cuomo and de Blasio. (Politico)

Video: You’ve ridden the subways, the buses, the ferries, but have you ridden the Roosevelt Island tram? Here’s the history behind the city’s unique travel option. (Viewing NYC)

If you savor a truly awful smell, the New York Botanical Garden’s corpse flower appears just about ready to bloom. It hits peak bloom for 24-36 hours, so if you’re looking to savor the smell of what is described as rotting meat, keep an eye on the flower’s status. (Gothamist)

The Nautilus, a new interactive art installation near the Seaport, is like a giant space-age musical instrument using light poles you can touch to produce sounds. The installation will be there through September 10. (Time Out)

The Coney Island Brewery, aptly located in Coney Island, will be expanding in August. (Brooklyn Paper)

This year’s Mermaid Parade in pictures. (BrooklynVegan)

and more pics. (amNY)

You can uncover your eyes. The Flying Wallendas successfully made the tightrope walk 25 stories above midtown. (NY Times)

Everyone pity the real estate investors, who have taken time out of their busy schedules to whine to any media outlet that will listen about how they won’t be able to deregulate rent-controlled apartments or unreasonably raise rents. (Splinter)

The city’s best cold noodle dishes. (Thrillist)

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