The Briefly for September 11, 2019 – The “Persistence of the NYC Dollar Slice Joint” Edition

The mayor’s failed mayoral campaign promises, how to make the L train slower, a man jumped in the Gowanus, the city buys more ferries, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The city removed the jimson weed plant at 93rd and Columbus, but there’s another plant three blocks away on 96th and Columbus. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jumping into the Gowanus Canal, which has served as a toilet for the city for nearly a century, is pretty high on the “stupidest things you can do in NYC” list, but that didn’t stop some idiot from doing it on Saturday night. He was brought by the NYPD for a psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

Almost nothing is as New York City as the dollar slice joint. Accessible, fast, open all night and welcoming to everyone, these relatively new city staples popped up after the 2008 recession. While Barney’s and Dean & Deluca can’t keep up with NYC real estate, the dollar slice joint persists. (Huff Post)

Is Broadway ready for Robert O’Hara’s “Slave Play?” (NY Times)

The mayor ran for office on a promise to narrow the gap between the richest and poorest New Yorkers. After six years under his leadership, the gap has not changed according to a new report from the Manhattan Institute and the changes that have occurred can be attributed to state-wide and not city-wide initiatives. (Politico)

Animal rights groups weren’t thrilled with the “humane” rodent murder-bucket of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, calling his demonstration grotesque, barbaric, and sadistic and pointed out there are other generally accepted humane ways to eliminate rats that they city hasn’t implemented. (amNY)

The city’s $1.3 billion plan to protect the east side waterfront from Montgomery to E 25th St will get an independent review before moving forward. The city has a deadline of September 2022 to spend federal funding recovery funds allocated to the project (Curbed)

Of Bon Appétit’s 50 best new restaurants in America, 4 are in NYC. (Grub Street)

Were the predatory lending practices that targeted cabbies illegal? The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan is investigating if bank, wire, or mail fraud occurred. The NY Attorney General and the mayor’s office are also investigating. (Patch)

Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick are returning to Broadway in Neil Simon’s “Plaza Suite,” which will begin previews in March. (NY Times)

Every year there are between 100 and 200 cases of Legionnaires’ Disease in the city. The latest was found in residential towers in the Bronx’s Bedford Park. (Norwood News)

One in 15 of the city’s middle schoolers is vaping. (Patch)

The L train doesn’t need to run any slower than it already does, so whoever the jackass was that put their bicycle on the tracks, you are not appreciated. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city is buying three more ferries to add to its fleet for a total cost of $126 million. Taxpayers subsidize each ride by $10.75 on top of the $2.75 fare. The New York City Economic Development Corporation calls this “smart planning.” Is there any wonder that the city’s comptroller’s office isn’t happy with this “smart” plan? (Gothamist)

Photos from Bushwig 2019. (Gothamist)

Photos from DragCon 2019. (Gothamist)

The first of a two-part interview from The Root with Mayor de Blasio was released, covering topics like the Daniel Pantaleo firing, stop and frisk racial disparities, decriminalizing marijuana, raising the minimum wage, and more. (The Root)

The helicopter company that was facing backlash for taking dogs on doorless flights around Manhattan will no longer allow animals on their doors-off flights. (Patch)

A video montage of non-consensual touching by costumed weirdos in Times Square, prepared by the Times Square Alliance. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is seeking $2 billion in restitution from opioid manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacy benefit managers to help New Yorkers who have paid too much in insurance premiums over the past decade because of the opioid epidemic. (amNY)

A driver on Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn killed a 10-year-old boy after his SUV jumped the curb. No arrests were made or tickets were issued at the scene. (Streetsblog)

According to workers, Chipotle is abusing its employees nearly as much as its abusing the stomachs of anyone who eats there. (NY Times)

22 hidden gem private dining rooms in NYC. (Eater)


The Times’ coverage of the anniversary of the September 11 attacks. (NY Times)

The six moments of silence to honor the 2,983 victims of the attacks. (amNY)

Traditionally, the skylight of the Oculus opens on 9/11, but this year it will remain closed due to repairs after it was found to be leaking earlier this year. (Patch)

Remembering 9/11 from the staff of the Windows on the World restaurant, which was located on the 107th floor of the North Tower at the World Trade Center. (Grub Street)

Honoring the Ladder 118/Engine 205’s lost. (Brooklyn Heights Blog)

The Briefly for August 13, 2019 – The “Polling at 0.11% and Not Giving Up” Edition

Corey Johnson opposes the 14th St busway, a Keith Haring work is getting restored, how much can a roommate save you, the history of Gotham, and more in today’s daily NY news digest.

Get ready for some heavy patches of rain today and through tomorrow morning. Good news, it will be clear for John Trivialta at Parklife on Wednesday night! (Patch)

After 100 years of business on the Bowery, Faerman Cash Register Co. has closed its doors for the last time. It’s not high rent that’s pushing them out, it’s real estate taxes. As a result, the family is putting the building up for sale. (Untapped Cities)

Never a person who learns from failure, the mayor says he plans on campaigning even when he doesn’t qualify for the third set of Democratic primary debates in September. The mayor received 23 out of about 20,000 votes in the Iowa “Corn Poll” last week. (Politico)

A video surfaced of the horrific car crash on Coney Island Avenue in Midwood that resulted in the killing of Park Slope’s Jose Alzorriz. This is the second death on Coney Island Avenue in a month and one of 578 crashes in the last year. The mayor was distracted from eating corn dogs and walking around Iowa while polling at 0% support long enough to give a statement. (Gothamist)

Ten secrets of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor when he’s actually in the city. (Untapped Cities)

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, are going to be laser cleaned and have their cracks repaired (the cement ones). (6sqft)

Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson story “The Lightning Thief” is getting a limited run on Broadway that starts in September and runs through January. Also headed to broadway? “Diana,” a musical about Princess Diana will begin in the same theater as “The Lightning Theif” in March. (NY Times)

87 percent of NYCHA apartments went without heat or hot water at some point last winter. Believe it or not, that number represents a decrease from the previous winter. (Curbed)

Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family is suing the city for placing her in solitary confinement when her medical conditions should have forbidden the Department of Corrections from placing her there. (Patch)

We are a month away from the 25th anniversary of ‘Friends’ dominating the city, so the release of a Central Perk LEGO set shouldn’t be a surprise. (6sqft)

Should you move to New York City? Probably not. (Curbed)

The city’s annual topless parade is August 25, one day before Women’s Equality Day, which starts on W 58th and Eighth Ave and continues to Bryant Park. (amNY)

Keith Haring’s “Crack is Wack” on Harlem River Drive in East Harlem is being restored. (6sqft)

“When you see someone being ableist to you or someone else, don’t ignore it, correct it. And for the record, if you see a complete stranger who is also differently-abled, it’s not weird to say “hi.” In a world full of abled body people it’s nice to know that there is someone just like us.” -Sasha Bogen, 2019 graduate of Achievement First Brooklyn High School (Kings County Politics)

The NYPD admitted it subpoenas Google and uses location data collected from Google Maps and other Google applications in order to locate suspects or witnesses. (Gothamist)

Veggie Castle is expanding into Brooklyn. (Time Out)

Arthur Schwartz is the public face of the 14th St busway opposition and protests are scheduled on Wednesday outside of his W. 12th St home. (The Villager)

Corey Johnson, who has regularly stated he wants to break the city’s car culture came out in opposition of the 14th St busway. (amNY)

Roommates in NYC. Can having one save you money? How much can they save you? Let’s find out. (Curbed)

Where did the “Gotham” nickname come from? It’s an insult lobbed at the city by Washington Irving of “Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” fame. (StreetEasy)

The mayor is questioning the circumstances surrounding Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide. (NY Times)

Should government-run and -affiliated pension funds divest from fossil fuel company stock? A look at the politicians pro and anti divestment. (Gotham Gazette)

After her defeat in the Queens DA primary, what’s next for Tiffany Cabán? (NY Times)

Prescriptions for free fruits and vegetables? Yes, as apart of the Pharmacy to farm program. (Huff Post)

Williamsburg’s L’industrie Pizzeria sits atop Eat This, Not That’s list of the best pizza in the state of New York. (Patch)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 14, 2019 – The “A Plan To Save Us All From the Sea” Edition

The religious exemption for vaccines is ending, a ball-pit bar is coming to Brooklyn, the weekend subway service changes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This is the end of the religious exemption from vaccines in New York state. The legislature agreed on a bill and the governor has said he would sign it to prevent future public health crises similar to the current measles outbreak. (NY Times)

It’s the weekend, so usual “check the subways before you go anywhere” rules apply. (Subway Weekender)

Get to know your Queens District Attorney candidates. (Queens Crap)

Jon Stewart, New York’s collective voice, had a heck of a week. It opened with shaming Congress, which resulted in moving the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund moving forward, and ended with an extremely personal gift from some grateful firefighters. (Gothamist)

The United States Army Corps of Engineers released a series of plans to save New York from when the sea rises up to eat us. Each of the proposals will cost billions of dollars and would dramatically change the city’s coastline. A plan will be selected either later this year or early next year. The plans range from a 25-year construction that would cost over $100 billion to nine years and cost about $15 billion. (Curbed)

The park at Essex Crossing in the Lower East Side is now open. (6sqft)

A 4-alarm fire broke out in Midwood that injured twelve and spread through three houses and was caught on fire. Three firefighters were among the twelve. (Gothamist)

Sometimes justice moves slowly. Elizabeth Lederer, the lead prosecutor in the Central Park Five case, will not return as a lecturer at Columbia Law School after the release of Netflix’s “When They See Us.” (amNY)

Here are the important points of info you need to know about the new rent reform package. (Gothamist)

There’s more to Coney Island than Nathan’s and Totonno’s. 9 places to eat in Coney Island, but honestly, all you need to know is Dona Zita. (Eater)

The 11234 zip code, where you can find Bergen Beach, Mill Basin and Flatlands, has more baby boomers than any other zipcode in the United States. The city has 14 of the top 20 zip codes for boomers, with the city holding the top four spots. (Patch)

The old Coffee Shop in Union Square is going to become a Chase Bank. (Gothamist)

There’s an office tower in Manhattan unfortunately named “Penn15.” (The Real Deal)

Where to eat a last minute dinner in the East Village. (The Infatuation)

The people in the city’s homeless shelters are treated like numbers and the employees of the Department of Homeless Services appears to be abusing “emergency” transfers to move people around for seemingly no reason. (NY Times)

Is El Museo del Barrio turning its back on the local Latinx community? The Mirror Manifesto, an open letter signed by artists, was read while protestors occupied the museum’s 50th Anniversary celebrations. (Gothamist)

Starting July 1, the NYPD will take a different tact with people who are homeless on the subway and commit minor infractions. Instead of a summons, they will be sent to a detox facility, shelter, or to get other kinds of help as needed. The purpose of the pilot program is to divert people away from the court system and to work to minimize subway disruptions, which had tripled in the last few years. (Patch)

Remember the most expensive apartment in the city? The one that came with two tickets two space, a yacht, two full-time servants, and a bevy of other amenities that seemed too good to be true? Turns out it was a fake and a marketing tactic for the building. The listing was a combination of about a dozen different apartments on the 45th floor. (Curbed)

What’s the best time of year to look for an apartment in the city? StreetEasy broke it down neighborhood by neighborhood, and we’re heading into the worst time of year for most areas. (Curbed)

It might not be surprising that the neighborhoods with the most excessive airplane noise are in Queens, with Brookville, Howard Beach, and Flushing topping the list. (Localize.Labs)

If you’ve fallen in love with the MTA’s new rainbow transit heart, you can find it on some of the city’s 1 trains and on MetroCards. Five subway trains are sporting the MTA Pride logo and you can get special edition World Pride MetroCards at a few select subway stations. (Gothamist)

The unofficial MTA Pride Train signs are back across the city. (amNY)

Turns out dads can be stay-at-home parents too! Who knew? (amNY)

There’s coffee and then there’s coffee. Sawada, a Tokyo-style cafe, is “one of the most genuinely inspired additions to the New York coffee scene in some time.” (Eater)

The Barclays Center announced a free summer concert series featuring Andy Suzuki & The Method, Nappy Nina and Dj Donwill, DJ Mick, and more. (The Brooklyn Reader)

An analysis from the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs indicates that the president’s immigration policies are having a chilling effect on immigrants using SNAP benefits. The rate of non-citizens dropping out of the program is four times higher than citizens dropping out. (NY Times)

Let’s ask the scary questions. How safe is the elevator in your building? (the Real Deal)

Let’s all say farewell to the small superheroes of NYC, with the last season of Jessica Jones closing out The Defenders’ run on Netflix. Daredevil, Iron Fist, Luke Cage, Punisher, and Jessica Jones were New York City’s heroes and the fun game of where was that filmed?” will have to be reserved for re-watches. (amNY)

They don’t make subway stations like they used to. This time it was Atlantic Terminal that saw a crumbling ceiling along the D, N, R tracks. This incident can be attributed to a non-MTA contractor puncturing the ceiling while taking a soil sample above ground, but add it to the list of inconveniences we all absorb on a daily basis. (amNY)

A ball-pit bar is coming to… no not Bushwick, but very close to it. (Gothamist)

Inside the NYPL’s Stonewall exhibition. (Gothamist)

This week in NIMBY news: The homeless shelter on Billionaire’s Row has cleared a legal hurdle but the neighborhood continues to fight against it. (Curbed)

In more NIMBY news, Community Board 2 has overwhelmingly voted against the mayor’s Rikers Island neighborhood replacement. (Brooklyn Paper)

The Grub Street guide to the summer’s “Can’t-Miss” food festivals. (Grub Street)

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