The Briefly for October 30, 2019 – The “Would You Like A Cocktail For Your Subway Ride?” Edition

Pete Wells drops zero stars on Peter Luger, Elizabeth Warren endorses Jumaane Williams, the 4/5/6 gets a speed increase, stealing an ATM, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Sections of the 4, 5, and 6 lines have had speed increases north of Canal Street that will go into effect this Friday. (amNewYork)

A duplex with a rooftop pool in Flatiron, only $30 million. (Curbed)

Video: Watch someone try to do a wheelie across the entire Brooklyn Bridge during rush hour. (r/nyc)

F&F Pizzeria gets high marks from Ryan Sutton at Eater, comparing the pizza to Scarr’s and Paulie Gee’s. (Eater)

Some people try to steal money from ATMs, others just steal the whole ATM. (Gothamist)

9 best dog breeds for NYC apartments. The real answer is to adopt a dog from a shelter. (6sqft)

Before phones or even telegraphs, fire watchtowers overlooked the city. Designated a landmark in 1967, the Harlem Fire Watchtower is the last of its kind in the city and its five-year restoration is complete. (Untapped Cities)

For a brief time in 1962, there was a bar on the subway, along with flowers, carpeting, draperies, and pastel lighting. Cheers to an awful idea! (Gothamist)

It’s official: Peter Luger is dead. ZERO stars from Pete Wells. (NY Times)

Let the Peter Luger opinions commence! (Eater)

Industry City submitted its expansion plans to the city. The approval process is seven months long and is still in question as Councilmember Carlos Menchaca hasn’t given the plan his thumbs up. (Kings County Politics)

As the temperatures dip, it’s important to know your rights as a renter when it comes to heat and hot water. (StreetEasy)

Ahead of a possible rezoning, the Landmarks Preservation Commission designated five Gowanus buildings as historic. (Brownstoner)

The minimum-wage increase in New York has lead to revenue and employment increases in restaurants, according to a study by the National Employment Law Project. The job growth is stronger than 12 other cities without minimum-wage increases. (Grub Street)

Read hero Kelly Bachman’s piece in the Times, explaining why she spoke up calling out Harvey Weinstein in the crowd at a show. (NY Times)

The population of Rikers Island is down, but reports of officers using force is at its highest since a federal monitor was installed four years ago. (Gothamist)

Rikers is supposed to close in 2026, but Governor Cuomo has his doubts. (amNewYork)

Say hello to the spookiest house in all of Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Elizabeth Warren endorsed Jumaane Williams for reelection as public advocate. This is your daily reminder that early voting is now available. (Politico)

The Museum of Food and Drink is in Williamsburg, which feels right. (Atlas Obscura)

Housing Works employees walked off the job for an hour to demand better pay and working conditions and in an effort to have their efforts to form a union recognized. (Gothamist)

Why hasn’t the MTA hired additional workers to clean the subways? Are clean subways not as important as The transit union’s $500 contest for the filthiest subway car has yielded some nasty results. (Patch)

The Briefly for August 8, 2019 – The “Boycotting Mega Rich Trump Supporters is Messy Business” Edition

How to research apartment buildings, One World Trade’s scent, stand-out dishes in the West Village, Cuomo tries to change the gun conversation and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

How should the city’s justice system fight gun violence? The NYPD and Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez have differing opinions, and no matter how difficult it is for them to see eye-to-eye on the matter, no one can ignore that shootings are up 10% and gun arrests are up 91% in Brooklyn. (NY Times)

It was a mass panic in Times Square as people fled for safety, storming bars or theaters, literally anywhere to escape what sounded like gunshots. It was a motorcycle backfiring. (NY Times)

You might be surprised how many playgrounds are built on top of cemeteries. (Untapped Cities)

On Wednesday, the outrage machine was aimed at Stephen Ross, the billionaire behind the Hudson Yards whose company owns Equinox, who is hosting a fundraiser for President Trump this weekend to the tune of a quarter-million dollars per person. People are calling on Equinox members to cancel their memberships, but if you’re looking to boycott businesses Ross has investments in, you better make a list, because it starts with SoulCycle, Momofuku, Milk Bar, &pizza, Beyond Sushi, and Bluestone Lane before you get into the companies his company invested in. When it comes to the mega-rich, boycotting is a messy business. (Eater)

Interested in finding out who you know that donated to Trump? Here’s an easy set of instructions to follow to make family gatherings really awkward this year. (Splinter)

Now that the primary is officially over, Melinda Katz is focused on the Queens DA election. (amNY)

If we’ve learned anything from the Katz/Cabán DA primary battle, it is that all votes count in NYC and everyone has to be extremely careful to make sure they fill out their ballots, affidavit or not, properly. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is attempting to shape the Democratic Primary by asking all candidates to endorse a list of gun reforms including banning assault weapons, creating a database to prevent the mentally ill from purchasing weapons, expanding buybacks, and “red flag” legislation that would allow individuals to seek court orders preventing others from buying guns. (Politico)

After a brief suspension, @placardabuse is back on Twitter, documenting all the different ways that cars with parking placards regularly abuse the privileges their placards may grant them. (Streetsblog)

12 stand-out dishes to try in the West Village. (Eater)

Where does the water go when you flush? Easy question, complex answer. (amNY)

One World Trade’s observatory has a scent, and it’s there on purpose. (NY Times)

How to research a building before you move in. You don’t want the reason that two-bedroom apartment is cheap to be because of the awful history of bedbug infestations. (Curbed)

An interview with State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, Brooklyn’s last standing elected Republican. She’s running for Congress to try to unseat Max Rose, possibly leaving the entire borough solidly blue in the process. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Sunshine Cinema building on the Lower East Side has been completely demolished. (Curbed)

The woman who was arrested and had her one-year-old son pulled out of her hands for sitting on the floor at a benefits office has, as expected, sued the city, the officers involved, the HRA and the NYPD. (Politico)

The city’s taxi regulators voted to approve the cap on ride-hailing app vehicles and limited how long drivers can wait for fares in Manhattan. In six months, the commission will evaluate if they should issue new licenses. (Patch)

Finding a pool table at a bar is getting more and rarer, but the tables are far from gone. (amNY)

Last week a judge recommended Daniel Pantaleo be fired for using an illegal chokehold that lead to Eric Garner’s death. One week later the protests have begun as the mayor has remained silent and the city waits for action from commissioner James O’Neill. (amNY)

The DOT announced a speed-up in the timeline for installing protected bike lanes on 4th Ave in Brooklyn, connecting Bay Ridge to Park Slope and will do so by the end of this year. While the city will never get Em Samolewicz back after she was killed by a driver in Sunset Park, her death isn’t going without action from the city to protect other cyclists from meeting the same fate. (Curbed)

A fund to honor Em at Third Root Community Health Center is being established that will welcome trans women & trans femmes to receive healing services from Third Root at no cost. Em was an admin staff member since 2016. (GoFundMe)

A farm? On Staten Island? Yes, and it’s part of the amenities. (The Real Deal)

Raising the minimum wage for restaurant workers hasn’t hurt the restaurant industry as a whole, despite protests to the contrary every time it’s proposed. (amNY)

A group of rent-stabilized tenants in the Lower East Side and Williamsburg are accusing their landlord of continuing with eviction harassment, illegal overcharges, and preferential rent hikes—despite New York’s recently passed rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

Thousands of children, parents and staff members from the Harlem Children’s Zone marched in this year’s Children’s March for Peace. The match started after an elementary school girl was hit with a stray bullet inside her apartment 25 years ago and with the recent rise in gun violence across the city and country, its message is needed more than ever. (amNY)

The mayor announced $9 million to revitalize social services in Brownsville in response to the recent mass shooting for anti-gun violence programs, to enhance response times from the Brooklyn Action Center, youth education programs, to hire more staff for the recreation center, and more. Last week Jumaane Williams called for more funding and not police to address future problems in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 12 hottest lunch spots right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for December 27, 2018 – The “Losing Your Job Over Poppy Seed Bagels” Edition

An NYPD’s accidental shooting victim sues the city, Long Island City primes its real estate, NYC’s immigration courts are a mess because of the government shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Let’s explore some NYC ghost stories, from the hellbeasts, to the Staten Island murder mansion, to the hellmouth at Hell’s Gate. (Gothamist)

There’s a ghost subway tunnel that sits above the Broadway stop on the G. The Second System was an abandoned 1929 expansion of the subway system, which would have included an additional tunnel between Williamsburg and Manhattan. That would have been helpful with the impending shutdown of the L. (Greenpointers)

America’s oldest mosque is just around the corner from the Lorimer stop on the L. (Bedford + Bowery)

The FIRST STEP Act, which is aimed at reforming the federal prison system and reducing recidivism, has roots in New York. US Representative Hakeem Jeffries, who represents parts of Queens and Brooklyn, crafted the bill. (Kings County Politics)

IT’s the most wonderful time of the year: Mulchfest! (6sqft)

If you think that you can’t fail a drug test because of poppy seed bagels, you might want to talk to officer Eleazar Paz. Paz was just reinstated to his post on Riker’s Island after being fired over his failed test in January. (NY Post)

Rising rents will claim Chelsea’s The Half King on January 2 after 18 years. (Eater)

Turns out the Queens podiatrist that helped President Bone Spurs dodge the Vietnam War draft did so for preferential treatment from his landlord: Trump’s daddy. (Gothamist)

A tribute to Larry Eisenberg, The New York Times‘ most prolific commenter (whose 13,000 comments were mostly in limerick form), who died on Tuesday at 99-years-old. (NY Times)

Eight minutes of NYC in the 1920’s. (Viewing NYC)

The home of the $18 coffee has closed. Yes, it was in Brooklyn, how did you know? (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

New York is the 15th state to establish a bill of rights for sexual assault survivors. New protections include the right to consult with a victim assistance organization during physical exams and interviews, examinations, preventive HIV treatment and other services at no cost, among others. (amNY)

The federal immigration courts in the city have been thrown into chaos due to the federal shutdown. The Javitz Building’s immigration court, which has a backlog of 105,000 cases, is closed while the Varick Street court remains open. (Gothamist)

The city’s minimum wage increases on December 31. For employers with 11 or more employees, $15 is the new minimum wage. Companies with less than 11 employees will have a $13.50 minimum wage. (amNY)

82% of shots fired by police miss their targets. Irene Ureña Perez was accidentally shot in the abdomen by one of the 27 shots fired plainclothes NYPD officer Juan Gomez while in pursuit of a suspect in early December. Perez is still recovering, has endured multiple surgeries and is suing the city for $10 million. (Gothamist)

Two of the men who were caught on video allegedly assaulted an NYPD officer on a subway platform in Chinatown have been arrested. (NY Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s 2018 transit wishlist. (Streetsblog)

As Long Island City girds itself for the delivery of Amazon’s tech bros, prices on prime real estate are going up. (NY Times)

The top restaurant standbys of 2018. (Eater)

30 New Year’s Eve events $35 and under. (the skint)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.