The Briefly for August 6, 2019 – The “Absolutely Unbelievable Story of A French Bulldog” Edition

The Union Square Tech Hub broke ground, the most rat-infested neighborhoods, a vigil turns into a mass shooting, a beaver in the Hudson, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Union Square Tech Hub, formerly the PC Richard & Son near Union Square, broke ground on Monday to cheers for new jobs and jeers that Union Square may soon resemble midtown. (amNY)

25,000 bees were removed from the Staten Island Ferry terminal in St. George. The NYPD’s beekeeping unit relocated the hive. If you come across thousands of bees, don’t spray them with anything and don’t call 311, call 911. (NY Times)

Meet Winston, a French bulldog who accidentally jumped off a six-story window, smashed through the sunroof of a car below and LIVED! Winston is staying at the vet for observation but has no broken bones. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio says Bernie Sanders would have won the 2016 election, does this embracing of Bernie mean the mayor is ready to stop spending his weekends in Iowa? (Politico)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard hit a milestone 10,000 jobs for the first time in half a century. While it may never see it’s World War II peak of 70,000 jobs, they are expecting to see 20,000 by 2021. (amNY)

Driverless cars have arrived in NYC, but they’re only inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard as shuttles, operating in a one-mile loop to and from the ferry terminal for free. (NY Times)

Which neighborhoods are the coolest in the city? Brooklyn Heights, Prospect Heights, and the Upper West Side. Strictly speaking, in those neighborhoods, tree cover provides the most shade and absorbs the most heat, making them the “coolest.” (Curbed)

The best Greek restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

De Blasio steps in it again. The city purchased a cluster of buildings in April for $173 million, which appraisals showed a value between $50 million and $143 million. De Blasio owns two houses in the city and the mortgages on those homes come from the brother of one of the people who sold the city the overpriced buildings. Par for the course for our failing presidential candidate of a mayor. (Curbed)

The Dogspot “pet harbors” aka “dog jails” pilot program in Brooklyn passed City Council. These are the little locking windowed air-conditioned jail cells for dogs to sit in while you go into a store. It’s a step up from leaving your dog tied up and unattended like your best furry friend is a bike. (Bushwick Daily)

Meeting, James Turrell’s skyspace installation at MoMA PS1 is open after having its unobstructed view of the sky marred by construction at the buildings where 5Pointz was in Long Island City. (Gothamist)

For those of the spooky persuasion, Halloween is less than 100 days away. For those inside the haunted house industry, it’s already time to get to work. Take a look inside the construction of the Bane Haunted House in Chelsea. (amNY)

Eight crypts and catacombs in the city, some spooky, some scary, some tourist attractions. (Untapped Cities)

What do Prospect Heights and Central Harlem South have in common? They’re the two neighborhoods with the most rats per square mile in the city. (Patch)

How cold do you want your ice cream? How about “liquid nitrogen cold?” Four Winters, a new ice cream shop in Queens, is using liquid nitrogen to create “instant ice cream.” (NY Times)

It’s a midtown sidewalk showdown between a business improvement district and food cart owners. Food cart owners are accusing midtown developers are accusing the BID of intentionally putting flower planters and bike racks where their carts usually stand in an attempt to get rid of them. (amNY)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite where over one million New Yorkers have been buried since the Civil War, operated by the Department of Corrections and inmates are paid $1 per hour to bury bodies, is finally getting a post-Hurricane Sandy restoration. Erosion has caused the shoreline to disappear and as a result, human remains were exposed. (Curbed)

Add this to your list of travel nightmare scenarios. A woman was locked underneath a Peter Pan coach bus with the luggage on a bus bound for Boston. The police arrested the Peter Pan employee that allegedly locked her in. (amNY)

Part of the deal that allowed the Atlantic Yards to be developed was that 2,250 affordable apartments would be built by 2025. At the current rate of construction, developer Greenland Forest City Partners looks like it’ll be missing that deadline. (The City)

A beaver was spotted in the Hudson River, hanging out and doing beaver things. It’s been a while since the city’s seen wild beavers, but the beaver is the official state animal and the city was pretty much founded on the fur trade, but this little guy is safe from that. (Gothamist)

The lawsuit preventing 14th St from becoming a busway has already cost commuters an additional year’s worth of delays. (amNY)

A vigil in Crown Heights became a public mass shooting when four of the people holding the vigil were shot early Monday morning. All the victims are in stable condition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Agrilus 9895 is a new species of beetle discovered in Green-Wood Cemetery and is a relative of a species of beetle in Europe but unique to Brooklyn. (Atlas Obscura)

Where do food industry pros go when their shifts are over? A list of late-night locations. (amNY)

The Briefly for January 31, 2019 – The “Amazon Threatens to Walk” Edition

Mayor de Blasio won’t stop talking about his fired staffer, the Winterfest saga continues, the unwilling public advocate candidate and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Winterfest organizer Lena Romanova used a pseudonym to harass vendors and the press. Complaints against Winterfest are being reviewed by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Brooklyn Assemblywoman Latrice Walker is a candidate for Public Advocate, even if she doesn’t want to be. (Gothamist)

Amazon plans to sponsor computer science classes in more than 130 of the city’s high schools. (TechCrunch)

Amazon executives have expressed frustration in private at their treatment in New York and made veiled threats of walking from their Long Island City plans during a three hour city council meeting. Maybe some computer classes weren’t enough to win over the long list of groups who are against HQ2. (NY Times)

Reminder: Google is building a $1 billion campus with no bargained tax breaks from the city or state. (NY Mag)

A ranked list of the city’s best matzoh ball soups. (Grub Street)

Watch a snowstorm kick the city’s ass for 30 minutes in this 29 second time-lapse. (@mattmfm)

The MoMA PS1 Skyspace is closed while the 5 Pointz construction obstructs a view of the sky that’s supposed to be completely unimpeded. (Curbed)

Take a look at the photo of the guy reviewing the place and ask yourself “Does this man look like he would enjoy himself a Taco Bell that serves booze?” (NY Post’s uptight Steve Cuozzo)

The city released a draft of Gowanus’ rezoning. Just try not to think about the decades old toilet that’s currently running through the neighborhood. (6sqft)

Watch the Queens president Melinda Katz’ State of the Borough 2019 address. (Melinda Katz)

A very small number of the 30,000 New Yorkers eligible for half priced MetroCards have signed up for the Fair Fares program. (Gothamist)

The city’s high school dropout rate hit a record low in 2018. (Chalkbeat)

How to watch next week’s the public advocate debate. (amNY)

“We’re not happy with the service. And we do owe the public an apology” MTA president Pat Foye. Pat Foye wins this week’s “no shit” award. (NY Post)

Mayor de Blasio can’t stop digging himself deeper when it come to his former aide fired after sexual harassment accusations. Now he’s blaming the governor of Montana. (NY Post)

16 date night restaurants in the East Village. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 18, 2019 – The “L Train Shutdown is Officially 100% Dead” Edition

This weekend’s threatening weather, the scheduled weekend subway changes and cancellations, Westsider Books might not be closing, the NYPD spied on Black Lives Matter, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A holiday weekend plus a winter storm? What could go wrong with the subways? Here are the subway closures and changes of service scheduled for this weekend. (6sqft)

THE L TRAIN SHUTDOWN IS OFFICIALLY DEAD! (amNY)

Here’s what’s next for the L train non-shutdown. (NY Times)

Here are the street closure’s for Saturday’s Women’s Marches. (6sqft)

Time to watch The Empire Strikes Back, because all your Hoth jokes are going to be relevant this weekend. (Gothamist)

The weather this week may be unbearable outside, but a NYCHA housing development in East Williamsburg is one of many developments without heat or hot water this week. (Bushwick Daily)

Chain store volume saw the first ever year-over-year decline since the number has been tracked. No wonder the Upper West Side was rallying to save a Starbucks. (GVSHP)

Case in point: the Kohl’s in Rego Park will close due to real estate and operational cost. (TimesLedger)

The Right to Disconnect bill, which would have made it illegal to be punished for not responding to after-hours communications, is being blocked by Mayor de Blasio. (NY Post)

Take a peek at the private pool, gym, and views from the first residential tower of the Hudson Yards megaproject. (Curbed)

James Turrell’s “Meeting” at MoMA PS1 is supposed to give an unimpeded view of the sky, something extremely rare in the city. How rare is it? New developments are now impeding the skyspace piece. (Gothamist)

Made in New York allegedly swiped the recipe for Prince Street Pizza’s famous spicy pepperoni slice, but it does not hold up against the original. (Eater)

While rare, the leucistic grackle that has been seen in Central Park isn’t going to be stealing the social media attention away from the Mandarin Duck. Why? Because leucistic grackle sounds like some kind of throat disease. (Gothamist)

Are we the bedbug capital of America? Hardly. New York lands at #6 behind Baltimore, DC, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Columbus. (Gothamist)

The Gowanus Canal EPA cleanup hit a wall and can’t move forward until the federal shutdown comes to a close. (Brooklyn Paper)

New Yorkers stand to lose $500 million a month in benefits if the federal shutdown continues into February, which will turn into a real humanitarian crisis. (Curbed)

Black Lives Matter activists were spied on by the police, who called protestors “idiots” while bragging about all the overtime they were receiving, according to newly released emails from the NYPD. (NY Post)

Westsider Books might not be closing after all. A Go Fund Me sprung up to save the bookstore and owner Dorian Thornley stated if he could raise $50,000 he would consider staying open. After one day, the campaign is close to $37,000. (6sqft)

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez made her first floor speech on Thursday. (Welcome2TheBronx)

A bit more about the super blood wolf moon lunar eclipse, or “goth moon,” this weekend. (Time Out)

Hussain Jawad of Queens was charged with murder, assault and criminal possession of a weapon after allegedly stabbing his wife to death and slashing his teenage daughter. His motive is unknown and his daughter is in stable condition. (NY Post)

Mayor de Blasio’s 34,160 affordable homes built or preserved in 2018 is an impressive number, but not to the Coalition for the Homeless. Only 16% of those apartments were designated for the homeless and those making under 30% of median income, $21k. (Gothamist)

Five ways to your hot chocolate on. (amNY)

15 proposals not in Governor Cuomo’s State of the State speech. (Gotham Gazette)

East River Park will be buried… so it can be saved. (NY Times)

The best spots for ramen in the city. (Thrillist)

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