The Briefly for January 10, 2020 – The “Governor Cuomo’s Art is a Nightmare” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The hottest lunch spots, MoMA and BAM get rival record store installations, the new hot bird, the BQX will not die, free Whoppers for the Bronx, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 48˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 42˚ High: 66˚

The MTA sent a cease and desist to an artist creating original subway maps on Etsy. His map is still available directly at his website. (Aaron Gordon for Vice)

The trains removed from the MTA’s subway fleet were removed over concerns that the doors would open while the trains were in motion. According to Bombadier, the manufacturer, “the doors had not been properly calibrated by a supplier.” This is all very reassuring. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The governor designed a poster and it’s a freakin’ nightmare. Cuomo himself supposedly had input on this monstrosity, and thank god he went into politics instead of art. Honestly it’s too unbelievable. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

A look at five city-focused proposals from Governor Cuomo’s State of the State address. (Bernadette de Vito for Kings County Politics)

>BAM’s Rudin Family Gallery is being , an installation that explores the significance of record shops and recording studios. The installation will include a working recording studio and record shop. Never Records opens at BAM on January 15. (Bill Pearing for Brooklyn Vegan)

Not to be outdone, MoMA is opening The Record Shop, in partnership with Earwax Records through March 1. There will be fine art prints, books, record players, and records that are a part of MoMA’s permanent collection for sale. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

A look at William Pope.L’s “member: Pope.L, 1978-2001” exhibit at MoMA. Pope.l is likely best known for his “crawls,” like “The Great White Way: 22 Miles, 9 Years, 1 Street” where he wore a Superman costume and crawled up Broadway. (Martha Schwendener for NY Times)

Adelina’s in Greenpoint is making some major changes for the new year. Last year the restaurant converted to all vegetarian and vegan and this year they’re jettisoning their pizza fritter for pinsa Romana. (Greenpointers)

The TWA Hotel is trying their hardest to continue to make headlines. A swimming pool on the roof, an ice skating rink, a bar in an airplane, and now a “retro Alpine hideaway.” No doubt you’ll find your jet setting friend posting to Instagram from the new roof installation. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Gowanus is full of unexpected activities. Shuffleboard, ax throwing, street curling, rock climbing, and don’t forget 3D archery. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Fran Drescher is developing “The Nanny” for Broadway. No word on when Ms. Fine will make her Broadway debut. (NY1)

“We are evaluating all legal options against Bombardier, including the best way to recover costs incurred as a result of this matter.” -Andy Byford (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The No Pants Subway Ride is this Sunday. (Kate Hooker for Brooklyn Based)

Move over Mandarin Duck, the hottest bird in the city is now the Painted Bunting in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Birds! (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to have a vegetarian birthday dinner. (The Infatuation)

For those of us who don’t understand the appeal of Wegmans, a personal essay about warmth, enjoyment and Wegmans. (Nancy Davidoff Kelton for West View News)

Who would have guessed that CBS NY would win “worst headline of the week” over anything at the NY Post? This week CBS went with a long-debunked theory about how HIV is transmitted to stoke fear about the new bail reforms. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The BQX just will not die. The $2 billion project that would link Red Hook to Astoria has a new website which gives some information about public hearings and the timing of the project. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

After the MTA proposed removing bus service from a portion of Roosevelt Ave in Queens, City Council Member Costa Constantinides has proposed a reform to the MTA’s board, allowing for each borough to have its own representative appointed by the borough president instead of the four members appointed by the mayor. (Kristen Torres for Jackson Heights Post)

Mayor De Blasio put a panel together to help decide what should be done with the necessary BQE construction along the Brooklyn Promenade. Their recommendation? Create another panel. No solution, some recommendations to reduce traffic, but ultimately a draft release of the report says that this is a project that needs federal, state, and local input. Perhaps this will be discussed until the BQE literally crumbles. (Dana Rubensten for Politico)

FREE Williamsburg is ending its run this year, the 22nd year of its existence. They’ll be celebrating the end at Saint Vitus at the end of the month. (Robert Lanham for FREE Williamsburg)

Burger King is trying to make living near the Joker stairs in the Bronx a bit less painful with a promotion for a free Whopper if you live in the Bronx through Uber Eats. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Neir’s Tavern in Woodhaven has been open since 1829 (or 1855 depend on who you listen to). This Sunday is its last day, as the bar is closing for good after a battle with its landlord over rent, so head out to Woodhaven this weekend to raise a glass to one of the city’s oldest watering holes. (Kevin Walsh at Forgotten New York)

Is a surprise for no one, WeWork lease-signing is at a five year low. (Jack Sidders for Bloomberg)

Nothing is as Murray Hill as this White Claw Hard Seltzer display where a magazine rack used to be. (@heybonanos)

A former Brooklyn cop was sentenced Wednesday to one day in jail and four years of probation nearly a year after he claimed a suspect almost ran him and his partner over with a car—until a video surfaced months later that showed he lied. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Two Wheels, Soho Diner, the Deco, the Awkward Scone, Yafa Cafe join Eater’s list of the 14 hottest lunch spots in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 18, 2019 – The “What Makes A Beehive A Hipster Beehive?” Weekend Edition

The Rikers replacement plan gets a City Council vote, the weekend’s subway disruptions, ridership on the M14 is up, thrilling breakfast sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Looking to go anywhere on the trains this weekend? Better check the planned subway disruptions before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

The City Council voted to close Rikers Island and the plan to replace it with neighborhood jails in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx is moving forward. (NY Times)

A look back at the Hall of Gems heist at the Museum of Natural History in 1964. (NY Times)

Deep inside the Woolworth Building is a swimming pool that was recently restored in all its stunning glory. (Untapped Cities)

Everyone in the city has enough to worry about before we start with “hipster” beehives. (Gothamist)

The MTA has turned Jay Street-MetroTech into an accessibility “laboratory” with a mix of infrastructure and apps in an attempt to make the station accessible to riders of all abilities. (Curbed)

The Department of Buildings released a new interactive map that tracks after-hours construction permits throughout the city. While it won’t stop the incessant noise, it will help to identify where it’s coming from. (6sqft)

Time Out’s list of the 100 best restaurants in the city has been updated. (Time Out)

The newly-expanded Museum of Modern Art is open, here’s what you need to know. (NY Times)

Brownsville resident Kyle Williams was arrested and charged with murder for the Old Timers Day Festival shooting at the end of July. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you absolutely must dance like an incel on the steps seen in the Joker movie, they’re on W 167th St between Shakespeare and Anderson Aves. (Time Out)

The governors of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania are working together to create standards for vaping safety regulations. (Politico)

The WNBA’s New York York Liberty will return to the city to play games at the Barclays Center after being outcast to Westchester in 2018. If only the Dolan family would sell the Knicks next. (Gothamist)

WNYC is going to end the show New Sounds, hosted by John Schaefer since its debut in 1982 as part of its shift away from music programming. (Gothamist)

A Mrs. Doubtfire musical is coming to Broadway. (Time Out)

The Brooklyn Marathon is Saturday, so get ready for street closures. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Turns out if you make the buses reliable, people want to ride them. Ridership along the M14 bus on 14th St is up since 14th St was cleared of cars. (The Villager)

An NYPD officer fatally shot a man during a traffic stop in the Bronx on Thursday, the second deadly shooting by the NYPD this week and the third time in three days that an officer fired at a suspect. (NY Times)

50-a is a controversial law that shields police personnel records from the public and the state is debating repealing the law. The Police Benevolent Association wants to look like it supports reform but is completely against the idea. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s 86th St has another name: the Pizza Trail. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 12 most thrilling new breakfast sandwiches. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for July 31, 2019 – The “Getting Paid Not to Show Up to Work” Edition

Triple-digit heat in subway stations, the MTA is accused of discrimination, de Blasio denies the Brownsville shooting was a “mass shooting,” dine-in movie theaters, and more in today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Balance your anger with hope and vision appears to be the message from Danny Harris, the new executive director of Transportation Alternatives, the largest advocacy group for better bicycling, walking, and public transit. In an interview with Streetsblog, he comes across more pragmatist than angry bike guy yelling at people on the Brooklyn Bridge. (Streetsblog)

Could hackers bring the city’s streets to a halt? Yes, and here’s how according to the journal Physical Review. (Patch)

Queens Community Board 2 rejected a plan to add 100 apartments to the development that replaced 5Pointz in Long Island City. (Curbed)

A state audit proved what every New Yorker already assumed: the MTA’s projects are plagued by overruns. Contractors were paid and sometimes didn’t show up, design problems lead to delays, and nearly everything costs more than budgeted. (Curbed)

Can brand-new bar with a wine selection and a $6 Miller High Life be considered a dive? (Grub Street)

A tribute to Arcade Bakery, “one of New York’s best bakeries hiding in plain sight,” which closes its doors for good on August 2. (Grub Street)

A town hall centered on rent laws has the potential to be contentious enough before a bunch of anti-vaccination idiots decide to commandeer the room. (The Villager)

Denizens of Coney Island are protesting one of two options for a city ferry dock in an attempt to preserve a fishing area. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A preview of the Gansevoort Peninsula, a 5.5-acre space and the future home of Manhattan’s first public beach. (The Villager)

Was the shooting in Brownsville a mass shooting? According to the mayor and failing presidential hopeful, no. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for more anti-violence funding and not more police after last weekend’s shooting in Brownsville. As he put it, “If police could solve the problem, it would be solved already.” (Gothamist)

Video: Who preserves the MoMA’s vintage electronic art? Meet television repairman Chi-Tien Lui. (Viewing NYC)

When the NY Times suggests going to the East River for “the freshest fish,” you should note Pete Wells is reviewing The Fulton and not suggesting catching and eating your lunch. (NY Times)

Is this marker in Woodside, Queens really the center of NYC? (6sqft)

A new mural in NoMad pays tribute to Evelyn Nesbit, aka “The Gilded Lady,” an actor, model, and New Yorkers whose life would be considered scandalous today, let alone in the early 1900s. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA is facing claims that three of its agents discriminated against a black woman wearing a hijab earlier this year. (amNY)

The person who doored Em Samolewicz, the act that lead to her death, was given a summons for $133, but the truck driver who hit and killed her remains uncharged. (Streetsblog)

Let that Kubrick obsessed friend of yours know that a comprehensive 2001: A Space Odyssey exhibit is coming to the Museum Of The Moving Image. (Gothamist)

When a pool and gym isn’t enough, luxury buildings are turning towards amenities like private IMAX screens, Turkish baths, a wine tasting room, and private driveways. (StreetEasy)

It’s not uncommon for a subway station to hit triple digits in the summer. (Viewing NYC)

The Global Citizen Festival announced its 2019 lineup with Queen + Adam Lambert, Alicia Keys, and Carole King among the headliners. Unlike OZY Fest, a festival in Central Park in late September has a low chance of being canceled due to heat. (BrooklynVegan)

G train operator Eric Boyo saved a woman’s life by pulling the emergency brake while pulling into the Fulton Street station after discovering a woman was on the tracks. (amNY)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is taking its advocacy fight against a proposed building complex with a new exhibit called “Fight for Sunlight.” (amNY)

The New York City Community Garden Coalition is protesting the city’s new four-year agreements citing overly restrictive rules and regulations. As a result, less than half of the city’s 550 gardens have signed leases. (amNY)

A look at the new technologies that the MTA will be piloting. Most of the startups are focused on attempting to make eventual failures and crowding easier to anticipate and communicate. (Curbed)

Governor Cuomo tried to hide the real reason the former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota quit last November. The real reason was the state’s ethics watchdog determined he couldn’t do his job and avoid conflicts of interest with his work outside the MTA. (amNY)

A definitive guide to the city’s dine-in movie theaters. (Eater)

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